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COMPLIMENTARY 

United Evangelical Lutheran Synod 
Carolina 

President 




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1803 Sesqiiicentennial 1953 



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HISTORY 



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of the 



LUTHERAN CHURCH 



In 



NORTH CAROLINA 




Edited bij: Jacob L. Morgan, D.D., LL.D., 
Bachman S. Brown, Jr., D.D., and John Hall, D.D. 

Published by the authority of tJie 

UNITED EVANGELICAL LUTHERAN SYNOD OF 
NORTH CAROLINA 



1803 - 1953 



PREFACE 



This volume is the outgrowth of a series of actions taken by the 
United Evangelical Lutheran Synod of North Carolina dating back to the 
year 1925. At its convention that year, the Synod adopted the following: 
"That a committee of five be appointed whose duty shall be to seek and 
secure such source material as will be valuable in the making of a true and 
accurate history of the North Carolina Synod, of the Tennessee Synod, and 
of the United Evangelical Lutheran Synod of North Carolina. That the 
personnel of said committee be not changed, except from necessity, for a 
period of ten years." The Reverends C. A. Linn, D. I. Offman, P. J. Bame, 
George H. Cox, D.D., and Prof. W. T. Whitsett, Ph.D., were appointed as 
the committee. 

In 1932, this committee recommended that a committee of six, two 
from each conference, be appointed to write a history of the United 
Evangelical Lutheran Synod of North Carolina, the said history to be com- 
pleted within the next five years; and that Dr. W. T. Whitsett be Editor-in- 
Chief of said history. This was adopted, and the following were appointed 
as the committee: Editor-in-Chief, Dr. W. T. Whitsett; from the Eastern 
Conference, The Reverends D. I. Offman and B. S. Brown, Jr.; from the 
Southern Conference, The Reverends P. E. Monroe, D.D. and L. L. Lohr, 
D.D.; from the Western Conference, The Reverends A. R. Beck, D.D. and 
M. L. Stirewalt, D.D. Upon the death of Dr. Whitsett in 1934, Dr. M. L. 
Stirewalt was appointed Editor-in-Chief. The committee was confronted 
with difficulties that made progress slow; and in its report to Synod in 1947, 
it suggested the desirability of a joint meeting with the Committee on 
Historical Work to consider methods and plans of procedure for further 
prosecution of the work. In his 1948 report, the President of Synod 
recommended that the Executive Committee of Synod be authorized and 
instructed to delegate to a present committee of Synod, or a special committee 
which shall be appointed, full responsibility for planning and directing an 
appropriate celebration of the Sesquicentennial of Synod in 1953, including 
the publication of the history of Synod to be ready for distribution the year 
of the celebration. This recommendation was adopted with the specific 
understanding that the action conferred upon the Executive Committee 
authority to change, merge or discontinue the existing committee on writing 
the history of Synod. At a joint meeting of the Committee on Historical 
Work and the Committee to write the History of Synod held August 25, 
1948, it was decided that the best way to handle the matter of writing a 
history of Synod would be to place the work in the hands of an Editorial 
Committee, and the following were selected to serve as this committee: Dr. 



Div.S, 

w '/' ^ 4 

Jacob L. Morgan, Chairman; Dr. M. L. Stirewalt and Dr. C. L. Miller. 
This action was approved by the Synod at its 1949 convention, and it was 
further voted by the Synod, to discontinue the old Committee to Write the 
History of Synod. Responsibility for directing the work was placed in the 
hands of the Committee on Historical Work, and the writing of the history 
was delegated to the Editorial Committee. 

In December, 1950, Dr. Stirewalt indicated that he would not, for 
various reasons, be able to proceed with the work; and in January, 1951, the 
condition of Dr. Miller's health became such that it was necessary to relieve 
him of his duties. Both of these men had done advance work which proved 
helpful to their successors. In January, 1951, the Reverend B. S. Brown, Jr., 
D.D., was appointed to take the place of Dr. Stirewalt and the Reverend 
John Hall, D.D., that of Dr. Miller. The passage of time had also necessi- 
tated changes in the personnel of the Committee on Historical Work. 
Members of this committee, as of 1952, are the Reverends Jacob L. Morgan, 
D.D., LL.D., B. S. Brown, Jr., D.D., John Hall, D.D., George F. Schott, 
Jr., C. N. Yount, and Professors H. R. Greenholt, Ph.D., and R. Brown Mc- 
Allister. Members of this committee have given valuable assistance to the 
Editorial Committee in many ways. 

The outline of the book is indicated in the table of contents. The 
Narrative Section was written by the Reverend B. S. Brown, Jr., D.D. and the 
section on Educational Development by the Reverend John Hall, D.D. The 
Sketches of Congregations were written by Dr. Jacob L. Morgan, and the 
material in the Tabulated Section was also assembled and arranged by 
him. Acknowledgement should be made to Pastor C. N. Yount, a member of 
the Committee on Historical Work, and also other pastors and laymen, for 
their valuable assistance. 

Sketches of congregations located in territory now embraced by the 
South Carolina and Virginia Synods are not included, since these may be 
found in the histories of those Synods. The sketches of the several Auxiliary 
Organizations were prepared by members of those organizations. Mrs. 
Aubrey Mauney wrote the History of the Women's Missionary Society, 
The Reverend Leroy C. Trexler that of the Luther League, and Mr. 
Leon M. Rivers that of the Brotherhood. Material on the Children's Work 
was prepared by Mrs. E. K. Bodie. 

Limited space does not permit the listing of all titles and authors of 
material that has been consulted in the preparation of this volume. The 
committee and the church are indebted to Dr. M. L. Stirewalt, Sr., for the 
preparation of a comprehensive bibliography of books, articles in periodicals, 
etc., which are related to the period under review; and a copy of this will be 
preserved in the Archives of the Synod for future reference. The largest 



single source from which material has been drawn is the Minutes of the two 
Synods. Complete files of which are preserved in the Archives. Much infor- 
mation was also obtained from the following histories: History of the German 
Settlements and the Lutheran Church in North and South Carolina, by Dr. 
G. D. Bernheim (1872); History of the Evangelical Lutheran Tennessee 
Synod, by Dr. Socrates Henkel, (1890) ; History of the Evangelical Lutheran 
Synod and Ministerium of North Carolina, by Bernheim and Cox (1902); 
History of the Evangelical Lutheran Synod of South Carolina (1924); 
History of the Lutheran Church in Virginia and East Tennessee (1930). The 
Moravian Records, the N. C. Colonial Records, the Helmstaedt Reports, 
and the Diaries of Paul Henkel and J. G. Arends are a few of the other 
sources which have furnished valuable background information. 

The committee recognizes the incompleteness of its work. The desire 
of the Synod to have the history ready for distribution at its Sesquicentennial 
celebration did not give its present members time for research and investi- 
gation that might have resulted in the discovery of important information; 
and the lack of space made it necessary to omit much available information 
that would have been of interest and value. Nor is it unmindful that in 
a work of this character, errors of fact and unintentional omissions are 
inevitable. In view of these things, it would suggest that such errors and 
omissions, wherever possible, be corrected in official copies preserved by the 
Synod, and that provision be made for continued research and investigation. 

— By The Committee. 



Table of Contents 



PART ONE 
Preface — Background and Synodical Developments 
I. Germans Come To North Carolina 
II. The Lutheran Church Is Planted 

III. Synods Are Organized 

IV. Dissension And Division 

V. The North Carolina Synod — 1820 - 1920 
VI. The Tennessee Synod — 1820 - 1920 
VII. Reunion 

PART TWO 
Educational Developments 

PART THREE 
Auxiliary Organizations 
I. Women's Missionary Society 
II. Children's Organizations 

III. Luther League 

IV. Brotherhood 

PART FOUR 

Historical Shetches of Congregations 

I. Active Churches 

II. Discontinued Or Merged Churches 

III. List of Parishes, Congregations, and Pastors 
of both Synods at the time of the Merger, 
March 2, 1921. 

PART FIVE 
Tables 
I. Of Ministers 
II. Of Synodical Meetings 



DEDICATION 



TO THE GLORY OF GOD, AND 
IN MEMORY OF 



Adolph Nussmann and Johann Gottfried Arends 

the first regularly called ministers in North Carolina 
this volume is dedicated 




The Rev. Jacob L. Morgan, 
D.D., LL.D., Chairman 






The Rev. Bachman Storch Brown, ^j^^ ^^^ t^-^^ Hall, D. D. 

D.D. ^ 



COMMITTEE ON HISTORICAL WORK 

The. Rev. Jacob L. Morgan, D.D,, LL.D., Chairman 

The Rev. John Hall, D.D. 

The Rev. B. S. Brown, D.D. 

The Rev. Geo. Frederick Schott, Jr. 

The Rev. C. N. Yount 

Professor R. Brown McAllister 

Professor H. R. Greenholt, PhD. 



GENERAL 
NARRATIVE 



History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 13 

CHAPTER I 

Germans Come to North Carolina 

History is more than a record of events arranged in chronological 
order. Back of these events are people; and back of these people are 
heredity and environment, training and experience. Events are related 
to each other and to the people who have a part in bringing them about. 
The history of Lutheranism in North Carolina had its beginning in the 
land of Luther. Early Lutherans who found a home in this State came 
either directly from Germany or from that country by way of England 
and Pennsylvania. Unlike some of the first settlers 'in America, these 
people were not adventurers, but men and women who sought escape 
from intolerable conditions and an opportunity to live and work and 
worship as a free and God-fearing folk. Some knowledge of conditions 
in the land from whence they came is necessary to an understanding of 
subsequent developments in the land of their adoption. 

Rivers, and territories adjacent to them, have been closely assoc- 
iated with the course of human history. The valleys of the Nile, Eu- 
phrates, Jordan, and many others, immediately come to mind. Famous 
in the history of Europe is the valley of the Rhine. Its scenic beauty, its 
natural resources, and its historic associations are such that one has 
not seen Europe until he has seen the valley of the Rhine. One section 
of this territory, now making up parts of Bavaria and Baden, was once 
known as the Palatinate. Its inhabitants were, by nature, industrious 
and peaceful; but its natural resources and its strategic location made it 
the frequent scene of political and religious conflict. Such was the 
condition during the first half of the eighteenth century. However inter- 
esting and enlightening it might be to trace the steps b.y which such 
a condition was brought about, the purpose of this narrative will be 
served by referring to the recognized historical fact that the ravages of 
war and the cruelty of religious persecution forced many Palatinates 
and other Germans to seek an asylum in the New World. 

Perhaps the first German to enter the territory that is now North 
Carolina was John Lederer. He did not come as a colonist but as an 
explorer interested only in charting the new country. During the years 
1669 and 1670, he was sent by Sir William Barkley, Governor of the 
colony of Virginia, on three different expeditions to explore the lands 
lying South and West of the James River. The expedition during the 
summer of 1670 carried him as far south as the Santee River and at 
least as far west as Trading Ford north of what is now Salisbury. We 
do not know his church affiliations, but he deserves mention, not 
only because he was the first German to visit Carolina, but particularly 
because his maps and description of the country which he had explored 
must have been circulated among his fellow countrymen who were 
Lutherans and who were seeking a place in which they might establish 
new homes. 



14 History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 

Reference should also be made to the first Germans who actually 
settled in North Carolina. People from Germany had begun to come to 
America prior to 1700, but the immigration that concerns this history 
began in earnest about 1708. Conditions in the Palatinate, to which 
reference has already been made, had forced large numbers of its in- 
habitants to seek refuge in England where they were given temporary 
asylum by Queen Anne. Later, arrangements were made to transfer 
many of them to her colonies in America. One group settled in the 
Colony of New York, another on the banks of the Congree River in South 
Carolina, and still another landed at the present site of New Bern, North 
Carolina in December of 1710. This last group of almost 700 people had 
joined a company of Swiss immigrants under the leadership of Baron 
Christopher de Graffenreid. The contract under which they came to North 
Carolina was a generous one, and there was every hope that they would 
soon be able to establish themselves comfortably and become economic- 
ally independent. However, a series of unfortunate experiences, which 
included an Indian massacre the year following their arrival and the 
failure on the part of de Graffenreid to fulfill the terms of his agreement, 
left them in great distress. No record has been found to indicate what 
became of these people, but the fact that many names of German origin 
are still found in Eastern North Carolina would lead to the conclusion 
that numbers of them survived and were absorbed into the growing 
population of the Colony. Evidently there were Lutherans among them, 
for it would be strange, in deed, if at least some of these Palatinates 
were not of that faith. Dr. H. E. Jacobs states that twelve families of 
Palatinates who had escaped from the massacre in North Carolina 
joined other Germans in the establishment of a parish in Spotsylvania 
County, Virginia. This was the historic Hebron Lutheran Church now in 
Madison County.* 

It was not, however, until some forty years later that the Germans 
who were destined to have a part in the permanent establishment of 
the Lutheran Church in North Carolina, South Western Virginia, and 
East Tennessee began to arrive in this territory. The Colony of New 
York first welcomed the German immigrants; but this friendly attitude 
soon changed, and around 1712, the current turned to Pennsylvania, 
where large numbers found permanent homes. But conditions there 
were also not altogether satisfactory. Quit rent (taxes) was high, and 
the best farming land had already been taken by earlier settlers before 
the later ones arrived; and before long many began to think of finding 
new homes elsewhere. Lederer's reports had been circulated among the 
Pennsylvania Germans, and it is not improbable that they created an 
interest in the territory which was described therein. However that 
may be, a definite southward movement had begun before the year 1750. 

This migration followed a well established course. In the Library 
of Congress at Washington may be seen an old map by Fry and Jefferson, 
dated 1751, which is of peculiar interest. It shows an old wagon road 
starting in Berks County, Pennsylvania, fifty miles west of Philadelphia, 
and running south for 440 miles. It comes down through Lancaster and 

* History of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in the U. S., p. 184. 



History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 15 

York Counties in Pennsylvania, crosses Maryland, and enters Virginia 
north of Winchester. From there it follows the Shenandoah Valley, 
then bears to the left until it crosses the Dan River not far from the 
present town of Danville, on by the Old Red House in Caswell County, 
North Carolina, and into what are now Guilford and Alamance Counties. 
Here it joins the Trading Path from eastern Virginia and North Carolina 
which continues in a South-westerly direction and crosses the Yadkin 
River at Trading Ford. Another route lay to the West, passed through 
Salem, North Carolina, and joined the Trading Path near Salisbury. Still 
another branched off near the present city of Roanoke, Virginia, and 
followed a South-westerly direction into East Tennessee. 

Down these wagon roads came the new settlers. Horseback riders 
made the trip in a week; others, walking or traveling in blundering 
wagons, sometimes required as much as a month for the journey. 
Movement was further retarded by the fact that many of the settlers 
brought household goods, equipment, supplies, and live stock with 
them. This immigration began soon after 1740 and continued until 
interrupted by the Revolutionary War. While this narrative is primarily 
concerned with those who found homes in North Carolina, reference 
should also be made to others who settled in South Western Virginia 
and East Tennessee, since the original territory covered by the North 
Carolina Synod embraces both of these areas. There were German settle- 
ments in Botetourt and Montgomery Counties, Virginia, as early as 1750; 
and a little later others were established in territory west of the New 
River now embracing Wythe, Smythe, Bland, and Washington Counties. 
By the year 1800, the movement had extended along the Holston River 
and its tributaries into Tennessee and had reached as far west as Knox 
and Monroe Counties in that state. 

The main stream of emigrants moved south over the roads that 
led across the Blue Ridge into Piedmont North Carolina. In the case of 
the Moravian Brethren, preparation had been made in advance of their 
arrival. Leaders of that Church who maintained headquarters in London 
had arranged to purchase a 100,000 acre tract of land from the Earl of 
Granville who had a claim to most of the northern half of what is now 
North Carolina. In the summer of 1752, a Commission from Pennsylvania 
came south and, after extended explorations, selected a site in what 
is now Forsyth County. The movement was well organized, under the 
direction of religious leaders, and the plans included provision for both 
the spiritual and material needs of the colonists, who had been selected 
with the utmost care. This group encountered many difficulties but 
soon succeeded in establishing a strong, self-supporting community. 

Other German settlers did not enjoy the benefits of such careful 
planning. No official organization directed the movement; and in the 
absence of official records, the time at which it began and the course 
which it followed must, for the present, remain matters of conjecture. 
Tradition, supported by some evidence, indicates that the first immigrants 
began to arrive about 1740. One group located along the Haw River in 
the part of Orange County which was later cut off to form Alamance 
and Guilford, and others found homes in what are now Davidson, Davie, 



16 



History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 



Rowan, and Cabarrus Counties, all prior to 1750. Settlements along the 
Catawba and its tributaries followed within the next twenty-five years. 
Occasionally, a small group would settle elsewhere; but the tendency 
was to concentrate in the areas indicated. Original groups continued to 
be augmented by the arrival of relatives and friends from Pennsylvania 
who were also seeking relief from unfavorable conditions in the older 
colony. All were Protestants and by far the larger number were ad- 
herents of either the Lutheran or German Reformed Churches. 

Familiarity with some of their peculiar traits, characteristics and 
customs is necessary to an understanding of these people and their sub- 
sequent history. First of all, they were Germans, and they possessed the 
strength and weakness common to that ethnic group. Heredity and 
environment had played an important part in making them what they 
were, and they brought with them both the strength and weaknesses of 
their background. They retained their language and customs with a 
tenacity bordering on stubbornness which had both advantages and 
disadvantages. Their conservatism and individualism prevented them 
from keeping pace with a rapidly changing order, but it also did much 
to keep them from falling victims to many of the abuses and excesses 
so prevalent at the time, and from being absorbed by other racial and 
religious groups. 

By occupation, these German settlers were chiefly agriculturists. 
Fertility of soil and an adequate supply of water were prime considera- 
tions in the choice of sites for their new homes. However, they possessed 
other knowledge and skills essential to the establishment of a self- 





The John Stirewalt Home 

John Stirewalt built the famous Pipe Organ for Organ Church. 

Date 1766 on brick. — Located on Beatty Ford Road 

about three miles from Organ Church 



History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 17 

sustaining community, and among them were artisans and craftsmen 
of no mean ability. Perhaps the first buildings were crude houses and 
barns erected near some fresh water spring, but soon each community 
had its water-driven grist mill and its community building for worship 
and instruction. A little later, the first crude structures were replaced 
by more substantial and convenient buildings. Substantial homes and 
churches of stone, brick, and logs encased with weather-boarding and 
celling still stand which were erected less than fifty years after the 
arrival of the first settlers. Spinning wheels, weaving looms, Dutch 
ovens, and other devices were standard equipment in almost every 
home. One congregation was the distinguished possessor of a pipe organ 
built, probably before 1790, by one of its own members. All of this bears 
eloquent testimony to the ingenuity and skill of these people. Their 
achievements are all the more remarkable when the inevitable diffi- 
culties with which they were confronted are recalled, difficulties that 
were the common lot of the American pioneer. A climate to which they 
were unaccustomed, the ravages of disease, the menace of hostile Indians, 
and the loneliness of strangers in a strange land are but a few of the 
many which might be mentioned. 

Certain traits of character which these German settlers seemed to 
possess, admirably fitted them for the role in which they were cast. 
They were industrious and honest, thrifty and economical, intelligent 
and determined. They were not ashamed or afraid of hard labor; and 
while they were ruggedly individualistic, they were ready to cooperate 
with others where community interests were involved. However, their 
lack of familiarity with the English language, their memory of dis- 
tressing experiences in the old country, and their desire to preserve their 
own way of life, made it difficult for them to become active and in- 
fluential in the broader fields of trade and politics, activities in which 
their English and Scotch Irish neighbors were most proficient. They 
settled in the country and long remained a rural people who spoke the 
language of their forefathers and retained their customs and their 
religious faith. 

Unsympathetic and prejudiced writers have sometimes accused the 
German settlers of being at least indifferent to the American cause in 
the War for Independence. That such an attitude might have prevailed 
on the part of some is understandable. People whose parents and 
grandparents had, less than three quarters of a century before, ex- 
perienced the horrors of a war that had driven them from their homes 
could hardly be expected to become enthusiastic over a struggle that 
would set them against a government whose former queen had been 
their benefactor. On the other hand, they were a courageous and liberty 
loving people who were quick to resent injustice and to resist oppression. 
There is abundant evidence to show that they were not only sympathetic 
to the American side, but that they provided a fair proportion of officers 
and private soldiers in the Colonial army, and that their pastors en- 
couraged them to fight for independence. At least one of these. Pastor 
Nussmann, suffered indignities at the hands of the Tories because of his 
outspoken support. Nor is there any support for the suggestion that 



18 History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 

the members of one religious group were more loyal and patriotic than 
those of another. 

These German pioneers also brought with them a definite religious 
heritage. The resurgence of Catholic power in that part of Europe from 
which they came, and their unwillingness to give up their Protestant 
faith, had served to deepen their consciousness of this heritage. They 
had learned the value of preserving their heritage, and among the few 
possessions which they were able to carry with them were Bibles, hymn 
books, catechisms, and other books of devotion. Many factors served to 
dim clear-cut denominational lines and to promote cooperative religious 
activities; but they did not obliterate these lines, and Lutherans and 
German Reformeds continued to maintain separate congregational or- 
ganizations. Historian Conner states that, as a rule, the Germans came 
into North Carolina in search of religious freedom and fields of mission- 
ary activity. He estimates that in 1771 the total German population of 
Rowan, Mecklenburg and Tryon Counties must have been not less than 
15,000.* These would include 10,000 Lutherans, 4,000 Reformeds, and 1,000 
Moravians. 

From these German pioneers and their descendants came most 
of those who were to plant, support, and extend the Lutheran Church in 
North Carolina. Since they were so closely related in origin and 
characteristics, passed through such similar experiences, spoke a common 
language, and frequently worshipped together, only those things which 
they had in common have been presented in this effort to introduce them 
to the reader. Reference to religious or denominational groups has 
been incidental, but these had developed in the old country and were 
carried over into the new. From this point on, the development of 
Lutheranism will be traced; and only such reference to other groups as 
may be necessary to complete the picture will be included. 



* "North Carolina" by R. D. W. Conner, Vol. 1, p. 159 



History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 19 



CHAPTER II 



The Lutheran Ct-iurch is Planted 

The German settlers who first came to North Carolina were more 
intent upon making history than in recording it. Their immediate 
concern was to build houses for shelter and clear fields from which they 
might gain a livelihood. With the exception of the Moravians, they 
were not part of a well organized society and were not under obligation 
to keep records and make reports. There are indications that they often 
did not even bother to secure legal title to the lands on which they settled 
until they had established themselves and were satisfied that they wished 
to remain in that particular location. Conclusions as to what actually 
happened during the thirty years following the arrival of the first 
comers must, therefore, be based upon three things: first, that which 
might naturally be expected under the circumstances; second, generally 
accepted traditions; and third, such records as have been preserved. 
This is particularly true of their religious activities during that period 
and for many years thereafter. 

The presence of Lutherans among these German settlers has never 
been questioned, and the concensus is that they were in the majority. 
They brought with them the heritage of their Lutheran faith; and Bibles, 
catechisms, hymn books, and other books of devotion were among their 
prized possessions. They had been trained to appreciate the necessity of 
the means of Grace, and they recognized the importance of providing for 
their orderly administration. With such a background, they were not 
likely to be indifferent to religious needs and responsibilities. It is 
true that they were not able to bring pastors with them. They came 
in small groups and even had pastors been available, they were in no 
position to assure them adequate support. There was no resident pastor 
in North Carolina until 1773, but there is indisputable evidence that 
Lutheran congregations had been organized long before that date. Dr. 
W. T. Whitsett observes that, "Contrary to the rule with certain other 
denominations, the Lutherans did not think it necessary to wait for 
regular ministers in order to begin their church work; they set up their 
church services upon their arrival, and with their duly elected deacons 
and elders conducted regular religious worship."* Historian R. D. W. 
Conner states that there was at least one Lutheran congregation on Haw 
River as early as 1745.** This may have been Frieden's, St. Paul's or 
Low's, all of which were organized at an early date. These observations 
are supported by tradition and by the fact that certain congregations 
were known to have been in existence prior to 1773. In 1768, John L. 
Beard of Salisbury executed a title to a lot containing 144 square poles 
to the Trustees of the Evangelical Lutheran congregation in the Town- 

* Pioneer Lutherans of N. C, p. 21 ** "North Carolina" Vol. I, p. 159 



20 History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 

ship of Salisbury, Rowan County. Organ Church in Rowan County, and 
St. John's Church in Cabarrus County, were organized congregations 
when, in 1772, Christopher Rintleman and Christopher Layerly were sent 
to Europe to secure assistance for North Carolina Lutherans. Tradition, 
supported by some factual evidence, would indicate that at least four 
congregations were in existence prior to 1750, and that others were 
organized during the next twenty years. Frieden's in Guilford County, 
St. John's and Zion (Organ) in Rowan, and St. John's in Cabarrus, all 
claim organization dates prior to 1750; and Low's, St. Paul's in Alamance, 
Philadelphia in Gaston, St. Paul's in Catawba, Pilgrim in Davidson, and 
Cold Water in Cabarrus, were probably organized before 1770. More 
detailed information will be found in the sketches of individual congre- 
gations, but there is little reason to doubt that all were organized 
congregations at the time of the arrival of the first permanent pastors. 

During this formative period, the need for regular pastors was 
desperately felt. Consecrated laymen could effect organizations and do 
much to hold the people together, but they were not authorized to 
administer the sacraments and to cultivate the spiritual development of 
an increasing number of needy souls. For these services they were 
dependent upon the ministrations of traveling pastors who, on rare 
occasions, visited the territory. Dr. Whitsett states, "For sometime before 
1755 Rev. Samuel Burgell had been preaching to Lutherans on Haw- 
River, and in that year went to Montgomery County, Virginia. Rev. 
George Soelle, a native of Denmark, born 1709, was called and ordained 
a Lutheran minister in 1741." Later, he was associated with the Moravians. 
These and others who had relatives or friends in the colony, but whose 
names have not been preserved, evidently did what they could; but 
their services were entirely inadequate. Repeated efforts were made to 
secure pastors from Pennsylvania without success, for even in that favored 
province the supply of ministers was insufficient to meet the needs 
at home. 

The newly organized Lutheran congregations in North Carolina 
had only one other recourse, to send to Europe for pastors and teachers. 
Accordingly, in 1772, about sixty families, adherents of the Augsburg 
Confession, from Organ (Zion) Church in Rowan County and St. John's 
Church in Mecklenburg (now Cabarrus) County resolved to make such 
an appeal. (It has long been assumed that St. John's, Cabarrus, co- 
operated and that Christopher Layerly was a member of that con- 
gregation; but positive proof of this is lacking, and there are some 
indications that Layerly may have been a member of Organ or of St. 
John's, Salisbury.) Realizing that correspondence would likely not 
prove effective, they arranged to send two representatives to present the 
appeal in person. Whereupon Christopher Rintleman and Christopher 
Layerly volunteered to undertake the task and to make the long and 
hazardous journey at their own expense. Their offer was gratefully 
accepted, and they were commissioned to go to Germany in search of a 
regular pastor and a well qualified school teacher and to ask for financial 

* "Pioneer Lutherans of North Carolina" p. 22. 



History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 21 

assistance in supporting them. A Commission from Governor Tryon, 
and a letter of recommendation to "Tiie Society for the Spread of the 
Gospel in Foreign Parts", in London, was secured. This Commission, 
written in beautiful script and officially signed, has been preserved in 
a little book now in the possession of Dr. Jacob L. Morgan. Contributions 
received from individuals and organizations in England and Germany 
are also entered in this book. Its contents would indicate that the two 
men carried this very book with them on their mission. 

Supplied with their credentials, they left their homes in 1772 and 
traveled horseback to Charleston, South Carolina. There they took a ship 
for London where they were most cordially received. The Missionary 
Society to which they appealed endorsed their cause; and the King, 
members of his court, and St. James' Lutheran Chapel in London made 
cash contributions equivalent to more than eight hundred dollars. 

From London, the Commissioners went to Hannover, Germany, 
where they were again favorably received. The Consistory of Hannover 
readily granted their petition for a pastor and a school teacher and 
officially called the Rev. Adolph Nussmann as pastor and Mr. John 
Gottfried Arends as school teacher.* Bibles, hymn books, catechisms, 
other books, and a communion set were also provided. The communion 
set has been preserved and is still in the possession of Organ Lutheran 
Church. Their mission having been successfully completed, the Com- 
missioners and their new pastor and school teacher made the return trip 
by way of London, and arrived in North Carolina in 1773. 

Both Nussmann and Arends proved to be eminently fitted for the 
work to which they had been called. Much of the authentic information 
about Pastor Nussmann which has been preserved is contained in the 
Helmstedt Reports which include letters and comments upon him and 
his work, by Dr. Johann Casper Velthusen of the Julius Charles University, 
at Helmstaedt, Dutchy of Brunswick, Germany. Dr. Velthusen at first 
questioned the wisdom of the selection on the ground that Pastor Nuss- 
mann had at one time been a Catholic Priest; but after he had associated 
with him in London, he became convinced that a better selection could 
not have been made. Little is known of the early life of Arends other 
than that he was born in Germany in 1741 and was educated at Teachers' 
Seminary in Hannover. The record of his work, however, attests to the 
wisdom of this selection also. 

Upon their arrival, these men located near Organ Church and 
immediately began their work as pastor and teacher, respectively. In 
1774, Nussmann moved to Cabarrus County and established his home 
near St. John's Church where he remained until his death in 1794. Arends 
continued to live in Rowan County until 1785. He then moved to Lincoln 
County and labored there until his death in 1807. It would be a mistake, 
however, to infer that these men and others who came later confined their 
efforts to the immediate communities in which they resided. Their 

* Variant spellings of these names are: Nussman, Neussmann ; Arend, Arndt, Ahrnd, 
Arnd. What appears to have been the original is used throughout this narrative. 



22 



History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 




The Gottfried Arends (Arndt) Home 

Located Near Lincolnton, North Carolina 



activities included the organization of new congregations and occasional 
visits to those which had no regular pastor, activities that necessitated 
much travel and long absences from their homes. They were more than 
pastors. They were missionaries, evangelists and organizers; and their 
labors resulted in the preservation and extention of the Lutheran Church 
in this new land. 

But the securing of a resident pastor, a school teacher and much 
needed books and funds was not all that the two Commissioners 
accomplished. So effectively did they present the needs and opportunities 
in the Province of North Carolina that the Consistory of Hannover and 
the University of Goettegen undertook the supervision and support of the 
Lutheran congregations in the Colony and promised financial assistance 
and a further supply of pastors and teachers. For some unknown 
reason, this arrangement did not become immediately effective. There 
is no record of any correspondence between Nussmann and the Hann- 
over authorities; no additional pastors and teachers were sent over; and 
there is no indication that the promise of financial support was carried 
out. The outbreak of the Revolutionary War a few years later stopped 
all communication with Europe for a period of eight years, and the 
North Carolina churches were deprived, at least temporarily, of the 
benefits that would naturally have resulted from such an arrangement. 

In the meantime, the needs in the new field had become so great 
that Pastor Nussmann could not possibly meet them. The only solution 
seemed to be to have the school teacher, Arends, ordained. The circum- 



History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 23 

stances attending this ordination and the procedure followed remain in 
doubt. The History of the North Carolina Synod, Bernheim and Cox, 
contains the following: "Upon the request of the congregation (Organ) 
and with the approval of Pastor Nussmann, he was ordained to the 
Gospel ministry, on the eleventh Sunday after Trinity as attested by his 
Ordination Certificate."* This Certificate is dated "Second Creek, Rowan 
County, N. C, August 28, Anno Christi, 1775, being the eleventh Sunday 
after Trinity." It is signed by Joachim Buelow, "Missionary and In- 
spector over South and North Carolina." No records have been found to 
indicate on what authority he acted as "Missionary and Inspector." A 
Rev. Joachim Buelow is said to have founded the Lutheran Church in 
the Newberry District of South Carolina, and to have been preaching at 
St. Paul's Church in 1775.** The place at which this ordination took 
place is generally supposed to have been Organ Church; and the Cer- 
tificate seems to support this, since it was issued at "Second Creek, 
Rowan County, N. C." The regularity of Pastor Arends' ordination may 
be questioned, but there can be no doubt as to his faithfulness and 
effectiveness as a pastor and churchman. 

After the close of the Revolutionary War, Pastor Nussmann again 
turned to the mother country for help. It had been the Consistory of 
Hannover and the University of Goettegen which had responsed to the 
appeal of Commissioners Rintleman and Layerly; but for some reason 
the supervision of the Lutheran Church in North Carolina was now placed 
in the hands of the professors of the Julius Charles University of Helm- 
staedt, in the Dutchy of Brunswick, possibly because the revolt of the 
American Colonies had been against the reigning House of Hannover to 
which King George III belonged. At any rate, a society for the super- 
vision and care of the Lutheran Churches in the State was organized 
at Helmstaedt; and Dr. Velthusen, a member of the Theological Faculty, 
became its leading spirit.*** 

On May 11, 1786, Nussmann wrote the first of a series of letters 
to Dr. Velthusen in which he presented the cause of the churches in 
North Carolina and appealed for help. He stressed the need for more 
ministers, and the Society responded by sending, almost immediately, 
three additional pastors. He further requested that literature be provided, 
especially a catechism designed to meet the needs of his people, and 
indicated the nature of the material which should be included. This 
request also received prompt and favorable attention, and among the 
books that were supplied was one known as the Helmstaedt Catechism 
which Dr. Velthusen himself had prepared. A second edition containing 
254 pages was called the North Carolina Catechism and was extensively 
used among the congregations of the State. Still another request was 
that money which had been collected in Hannover for the benefit of 
St. John's Church, Cabarrus County, and which it was feared might have 
been forfeited because of the sympathy of its members toward the 
American cause in the recent war, be turned over to the congregation. 

♦ History of N. C. Synod, p. 16. *♦ History of S. C. Synod (1924) p. 130. 
•** Bernheim. German Settlements and Lutherans in the Carolinas, p. 258. 



24 



History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 



This was also done, and the principal of the fund was kept intact until 
1843 when it was used toward the erection of the present church building. 

The first of the ministerial recruits to arrive was the Rev. Christian 
Eberhard Bernhardt, a native of Stuttgart in the Kingdom of Wurtem- 
berg. He was ordained in Wurtemberg about 1785 and came to Georgia 
in 1786. The following year, he moved to North Carolina, and for one 
year he served congregations in what is now Davidson County. In 1788, 
he became pastor of congregations in Forsyth and Stokes Counties which 
had been organized and frequently visited by Pastor Nussmann. The 
following year, he moved to Guilford County where he served until the 
close of the year 1800. At that til^e, he accepted a call to Zion and other 
Lutheran Churches in the vicinity of Lexington, South Carolina. Here he 
remained until his death in 1809. He approved of the organization of 
the North Carolina Synod, and at the time of his death, he and his 
congregations were members of the Synod. 

The Rev. Carl Augustus Gottlieb Storch was the next to arrive. He 
was born in Helmstaedt, Germany, on June 16, 1764, and received his 
education in the schools and University of his native city. In 1788, he 
received a call to serve as a pastor in North Carolina, was ordained, and 
immediately sailed for America. He arrived in Baltimore on June 27 of 




Storch Home 

Right Section with modern weatherboard integument is the original 
house where Pastor C. A. G. Storch lived. Located on Old Salis- 
bury-Concord highway, one mile north of Ebenezer Church. The 
Oak tree, estimated to be over 300 years old, measures 152 feet 
from bough-tip to bough-tip. 



History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 25 

that year. From there he traveled by sea to Charleston, South Carolina, 
where he purchased a horse and proceeded overland to North Carolina 
and arrived at the home of Pastor Nussmann in September. He had been 
called to the churches in Guilford and Alamance Counties, but for some 
reason, his plans were changed and he became the pastor of St. John's, 
Salisbury, Organ, and Pine (Union) Churches. Savitz Church (now 
Lutheran Chapel) located in what was called the Irish Settlement, was 
soon included in his parish. His native gifts, his superior education, 
and his consecrated life soon won for him a place in the hearts of his 
own people and the respect of the community at large; and his ministry 
of forty-one years was a fruitful one. 

The third of these recruits, the Rev. Arnold Roschen, was born, 
educated, ordained, and married in Bremen, Germany. He arrived in 
Charleston, South Carolina, November 28, 1788, and in North Carolina 
February 20, 1789. For the next ten years, he served churches in what 
is now Davidson County. Much information about conditions in his 
new field of labor are contained in a letter which he wrote his friend 
and preceptor, the Rev. Nicolai of Bremen, in the spring of 1789, and in 
his report to the Helmstaedt Society. At first, he seemed to be happy in 
his new work; but later he became dissatisfied, and returned to Germany 
in 1800. The Rev. Paul Henkel, a good judge of men, makes the 
comment in his diary that Pastor Roschen was a misfit. 

In 1794, the name of Robert Johnson Miller was added to the list 
of those pastors who were serving in Lutheran congregations in the 
State. He was born near Dundee, Scotland, July 11, 1758. His parents 
desired that he enter the ministry, and to this end they sent him to a 
classical school in Dundee. After he had completed his education, but 
before he had entered the ministry, he migrated to America and ar- 
rived at Charlestown, Massachusetts, in 1774. Later, he enlisted in the 
American Army and took part in many of its engagements. His service 
carried him to the South where he remained after peace had been 
declared and the Army had been disbanded. Influenced by his former 
training and perhaps by gratitude that his life had been preserved, 
he applied to the Methodist Episcopal Church for a license to preach the 
Gospel. Under this authority, he began preaching in the western 
counties of North Carolina. One of the congregations which he served 
was Whitehaven in Lincoln County. This was nominally a Protestant 
Episcopal Church, but Lutherans and possibly German Reformeds partici- 
pated in its activities; and the congregation had, for some time, been 
dependent upon Pastor Arends for the administration of the Word and 
Sacraments. The Episcopalians were highly pleased with the services 
of Mr. Miller; but since his license did not authorize him to administer 
the sacraments, and since there was no Episcopal Diocese in the state 
at that time, they petitioned the Lutheran pastors of Cabarrus and 
Rowan Counties to ordain him. In compliance with the wishes of the 
petitioners, a meeting was held in St. John's Church, Mecklenburg 
(Cabarrus) County on May 20, 1794, at which the Revs. Nussmann, 
Arends, Storch, Roschen, and Bernhardt, the five pastors then on the 
field, were present. All participated in the examination and ordination 



26 History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 

and signed their names to an Ordination Certificate which, in mutilated 
form, has been preserved.* On the reverse side of this certificate, the 
Lutheran ministers gave their reasons for ordaining a member of the 
Episcopal Church as a minister of that denomination. According to 
the standards of any well organized ecclesiastical society, such a pro- 
cedure would have been highly irregular; but these pastors must have 
felt that circumstances justified their action. However that may be, 
Pastor Miller rendered a valuable service to the Lutheran Church in 
North Carolina. He possessed the rare faculty of being able to serve 
its interests faithfully even though he continued to have a deep interest 
in his mother church. As a result of his pastoral efforts, many 
individuals and even whole congregations were preserved to the Lutheran 
Church. 

Still another pastor whose labors reached back into this period 
was the Rev. Paul Henkel, a great-grandson of the Rev. Gerhard Henkel 
who was one of the pioneer Lutheran ministers in America and who 
had arrived about 1718. He was born on Dutchman's Creek in what is 
now Davie County, North Carolina, about sixteen miles north of Salis- 
bury, December 15, 1754, and thus was the first native born pastor to serve 
in the state. In 1760, the family moved to Virginia, and it was there he 
began his preparation for the ministry. He was licensed to preach by the 
Ministerium of Pennsylvania and was ordained by that body, in Phila- 
delphia, June 6, 1792. The early years of his ministry were spent in Vir- 
ginia, but in 1800 he accepted a call from a group of congregations in 
Rowan and adjoining counties and continued to serve them until 1805 at 
which time he returned to Virginia. His influence upon the development of 
Lutheranism in his native state extended, however, far beyond the parish 
which he served and the time during which he resided within the bounds 
of the State. He was inbued with the missionary spirit so prevalent 
among the pastors of his day, and was endowed with a restless energy 
that drove him to almost unbelievable activities in behalf of his church 
and its scattered adherents. He made repeated missionary tours through 
western Virginia, Tennessee, Kentucky, Ohio, Indiana, and North and 
South Carolina. His diary, which has been translated by Dr. W. J. Finck, 
covers 385 typewritten pages and is an invaluable source of material 
for the historian who is interested in that period. 

Under the leadership of these men, the Lutheran Church gained 
a foothold among the fertile hills and valleys of Piedmont North Carolina, 
It is noteworthy that, in at least two particulars, the Lutheran develop- 
ment in North Carolina differed from that in other Southern Provinces. 
The first is that Lutheran settlers who came to North Carolina during 
this period were all Palatinates and, with the exception of the group at 
New Bern, had lived at least for a short time in Pennsylvania, while 
many of those who settled in other provinces came directly to their new 
homes from different parts of Europe. Another was that such assistance 
and supervision as was received came directly from the mother country. 
Even the Patriarch Muhlenberg missed North Carolina entirely when 

• Bernheim, p. 339. 



History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 27 

he made his tours of inspection in other southern colonies; and all 
pastors, with the exception of the Rev. Paul Henkel, were born and 
educated in Germany. The one contributed to the close community of 
interests which prevailed, and the other did much to determine the 
type of Lutheranism which developed. Both are reflected in the manifest 
concern which pastors felt for the spiritual needs of their unchurched 
brethren, irrespective of parish lines, and in the fine spirit of fellowship 
which prevailed among them. 

The foregoing paragraphs reveal, in barest outline, the process 
by which the Lutheran Church took root in North Carolina. For thirty 
years there were no regular pastors, but consecrated laymen organized 
congregations and managed to hold the faithful together. Then, with 
the coming of Nussmann and Arends in 1773 and the promise of continued 
support from the church in Germany, a new day seemed to be dawning. 
But the bright prospects were darkened by the outbreak of the war with 
England; and for fourteen long years, these two men were left to care 
for the spiritual needs of thousands of souls living in an area which 
now comprises ten counties. The reestablishment of contact with the 
mother church, and the arrival of Pastors Bernhardt, Storch, and Roschen 
in 1787-1788 improved the situation somewhat; but the resources of men 
and materials were still entirely insufficient to meet the needs and 
opportunities. Had these been available, the story of Lutheranism in the 
State might have been quite different; but the heroism and devotion 
of those who did live and serve under such serious handicaps might 
not have stood out so conspicuously. 

The record of what was actually accomplished prior to the year 
1800 is pitifully incomplete. It is impossible even to estimate with any 
degree of accuracy the number of Lutherans who came into the territory 
or the smaller number who were gathered into congregations. Some 
idea, however, may be gained from the list of congregations that were 
organized during the period. The list which follows may not be complete, 
and the dates of organization may not be exact; but both are based on 
such information as is available: 

Approx. 
Name of Congregation Location Date Org. 

Beck's Davidson County 1787 

Bethany Davidson 1789 

Bethel Gaston (Crouse) 1790 

Cold Water Cabarrus 1768 

Daniel's Lincoln 1774 

Emmanuel Lincon (Lincolnton) 1787 

Frieden's Guilford 1745 

Grace Catawba 1797 

Low's (Lau's) Guilford 1760 



28 History of the Lutheran Church in N, C. 

Lutheran Chapel (Savitz) Rowan 1780 

Morning Star (Crooked Creek) Mecklenburg 1797 

Nazareth Forsyth 1778 

Organ (Zion) Rowan 1745 

Pilgrim (Leonard's) Davidson 1757 

Philadelphia Gaston 1767 

Reformation (Dutchman's Creek)... Davie 1785 

Richland Randolph 3780 

Salem Lincoln 1796 

Shiloh (Muddy Creek) Forsyth 1777 

St. John's Catawba 1799 

St. John's Cabarrus 1745 

St. John's Rowan (Salisbury) 1747 

St. Luke's (Sandy Creek) Davidson 1788 

St. Luke's (Ore Bank) Gaston 1785 

St. Mark's Gaston 1791 

St. Paul's Alamance 1760 

St. Paul's Catawba 1768 

Union (Pine) Rowan 1774 

White Haven Lincoln 1794 

Zion Catawba 1790 



History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 29 



CHAPTER III 



A Synod is Organized 

History abounds in dates that are of outstanding importance. Such 
dates are usually associated with specific events, but they may also be 
used to mark the transition from one stage of development to another. 
Three significant dates in early North Carolina Lutheran history are 
1743, 1773, and 1803. Each initiates a distinct period in the growth of the 
Lutheran Church in this state. The first is only approximate, as the year 
in which Lutherans began permanent settlements in what is now North 
Carolina can not be established with absolutely certainty. During the 
years that followed, consecrated laymen, almost entirely unsupported by 
outside assistance, kept the faith alive and organized congregations. No 
permanent pastors were available, no material support could be obtained, 
and no guiding hand was extended. Lutherans to the North had so many 
problems of their own that they could not offer help, and the Church in 
the Fatherland had not yet become concerned about their plight. Only 
the loyalty of men and women thoroughly grounded in the faith and 
guided by the Holy Spirit enabled the church to survive during these 
trying years. 

The second period, which began in 1773, witnessed the arrival of 
pastors from Europe and the assumption, to at least some extent, of re- 
sponsibility for support and guidance by the mother Church. While this 
arrangement undoubtedly did much to preserve and strengthen the Church 
in the new land, its possibilities were never fully realized. It was almost 
immediately interrupted by the outbreak of war; and when it was later 
resumed, the support was irregular and never adequate to the needs, 
and by the end of the century, it seems to have ceased entirely. The 
outstanding mark of the period was the untiring service of the few pastors 
who did answer the Macedonian call. The far-reaching and effective min- 
istry of Nussmann, Arends, Storch, and Paul Henkel, in particular, would 
compare favorably with that of other American Lutheran patriarchs whose 
activities have received much wider recognition. 

The third period began with the formation of the North Carolina 
Synod in 1803. It is marked by organization for co-operative effort and 
by the difficulties that were incident thereto. Official relationship with 
the Church in Germany seems to have lapsed after the Helmstaedt So- 
ciety disbanded. Just when that occurred is not known. Shortly before 
1790, Professor Klugel and Dr. Velthusen, two of the Society's most active 
leaders, removed to other fields of labor; and the Society evidently dis- 
banded or lost interest in the mission field in North Carolina. Corre- 
spondence between Dr. Velthusen and Pastor Storch continued for more 
than a decade, but it seems not to have been of an official nature. Pastor 



30 History of the Lutheran Church in N, C. 

Storch wrote Dr. Velthusen as late as February 25, 1803; but the fact 
that this letter is published in one of Dr. Velthusen's individual works, 
and not in the Helmstaedt Report, indicates that the Society was no 
more.* Thus the Lutheran pastors and congregations were again thrown 
entirely upon their own resources. 

In the meantime, problems had arisen which clearly indicated the 
need for some authoritative organization. Due partly to the aftermath 
of war and partly to the spirit of rationalism and infidelity which was 
so prevalent in Europe and America, both the faith and morals of the 
people had deteriorated to an alarming degree. This was followed by an 
outburst of intensive religious activity which manifested itself in the wave 
of extremely emotional revivalism whch began about 1801. Pastor Storch 
described its nature and effect in his letter to Dr. Velthusen in 1803, and 
Pastor Paul Henkel deals with the same subject at length in a report 
to the Virginia Conference held in 1806 which is recorded in its German 
Minutes.** In his report, Henkel states, "The German ministers were at 
first divided in their opinions on the subject; nevertheless, it drove them 
to more intimate communion with each other in their official acts, and 
they had thus the opportunity to investigate the matter more closely." 

Another problem grew out of the pressing need for more ministers. 
Pastor Nussmann had died in 1794, and the ministerial ranks in North 
Carolina had been further depleted by the return of Roschen to Germany 
and the removal of Bernhardt to South Carolina. The serious nature 
of this problem had been brought forcibly to the attention of the Church 
by the petition for the ordination of Mr. R. J. Miller, to which reference 
has already been made. The unanimous concurrence of the resident pas- 
tors in his examination and ordination gave these actions some official 
standing; but the fact that they felt impelled to justify their actions 
testifies to their realization that no properly constituted body for the 
training and ordination of much needed ministers was available, since re- 
lations with the church in Germany were no longer active and since the 
Pennsylvania Ministerium, the only other body to which they could turn, 
had not extended its jurisdiction south of Virginia. There is, however, 
no evidence that any other business was transacted at this meeting held 
in St. John's Church, May 20, 1794, or that any steps were taken looking 
to closer co-operation through an official organization; but the need 
must have been discussed, at least informally, by this group of consecrated 
men who faced such grave problems. 

If such a step was contemplated, the death of Pastor Nussmann, 
which occurred a few months later, might well have served to delay 
action. However that may be, there is no record of further agitation 
until nine years later. In his diary for 1803, Paul Henkel writes, "March 
20th I went to Pastor Storch and made this proposition to him: That 
we arrange a kind of Conference for the union of our (Lutheran) min- 
isters in the state, in order that we might further the education of the 
young men that have the ministry in view. Pastor Storch agreed to the 

* Bernheim History, pp. 348, 355. ** Bernheim, pp. 350-354. 



History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 31 

plan. I next went to Pastor Miller in Lincoln County and he agreed to 
the plan, and then together we went to Pastor Arends, who, though old 
and almost totally blind, agreed to attend. Thereupon over the third 
Sunday after Easter, services were held in the so-called Pine Church, four 
miles from Salisbury, Friday, Saturday, and Sunday, to which a vast 
host of people came. On Monday the preachers met with a number of 
delegates in a house in town. Thus the foundation of the institution was 
laid to which up to the present time the parts of a building have been 
added."* 

The minutes of this meeting state that Pastors J. G. Arends, Carl 
A. Storch, R. J. Miller, and Paul Henkel were present, together with 
fourteen lay delegates from the congregations of the Revs. Arends, Storch, 
Henkel, and from vacant congregations. The names of the congregations 
represented are not given, but Drs. Bernheim and Cox state "that there 
are good reasons for believing that Organ, St. John's of Salisbury, Union, 
Lutheran Chapel, St. John's of Lincoln County, Reformation, St. Luke's 
and Pilgrim of Davidson County, Richland, St. Paul's of Alamance County, 
Lau's, Frieden's, Beck's, and Nazareth congregations were represented.** 
In the absence of positive evidence, this list must be taken as a mere 
supposition. St. John's, Cabarrus, did not take part in the organization, 
possibly because its Constitution provided that it should be placed under 
the supervision of the Consistory of Hannover. In case this relationship 
was interrupted, the congregation was then to apply to the ministry in 
connection with the Pennsylvania Synod.*** 

Little business was transacted at the meeting in Salisbury other 
than that which was necessary to effect an organization. Pastor Arends 
was elected president, and Pastor R. J. Miller secretary. Consideration 
of the proposed constitution according to which the Lutheran Church 
should be governed was postponed until the annual meeting of Synod. It 
was decided that the annual meeting be held on the third Monday in Octo- 
ber and that the first regular yearly meeting be held in Lincolnton. This 
meeting was held on October 17, 1803, at Lincolnton, and the proposed 
constitution was adopted. This constitution contained nine brief articles. 
Articles I, II, III, and VII cover meetings, membership, and the annual 
election of a president. Membership was to consist of ministers, and one 
lay delegate from each congregation. All lay delegates from various 
congregations served by one pastor, taken together, were to have but 
one vote. Articles IV, VI, and IX deal with the qualifications and require- 
ments of pastors. Articles V and VIII suggest the responsibilities of the 
Synod toward vacant congregations and "towards relieving the necessities 
and granting the reasonable requests of all congregations in this, and 
also all other states." It is concerned almost entirely with matters of a 
practical nature with which the Church was confronted and makes no 
direct reference to a doctrinal basis. However, the following resolution 
was among several that were adopted at the second convention and 
added to the constitution: "Resolved, that the twenty-one articles of 
the Augsburg Confession be published for the benefit of the church." 

* Diary, p. 81. ** History of N. C. Synod, p. 25. *** Bernheim History, p. 251. 



32 History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 

Naturally, some time elapsed before the new Synod became well 
established and began to function regularly and effectively. The second 
annual convention was held at Leonard's Church near Lexington on 
October 21, 1804. Pastors Storch, R. J. Miller, and Paul and Philip 
Henkel together with lay delegates from Rowan, Guilford, and Lincoln 
Counties were present. Philip Henkel had been licensed by the Minis- 
terium of Pennsylvania and was serving churches in Guilford and neigh- 
boring counties. Paul Henkel was elected president and R. J. Miller 
secretary. Arrangement was made for the holding of a special confer- 
ence in March of the next year in Pine Church, to consider the propriety 
of Philip Henkel's going to Lincoln in Pastor Arends' place; he having 
been called there. This conference was held as planned, and arrange- 
ments were evidently made for the ordination of Philip Henkel. He was 
ordained by Pastor Storch at "My Second Church" (Pilgrim), April 28, 
1805.* 

No records of a regular meeting of the Synod in 1805 have been 
found. On October 20, 1806, Synod met in Organ Church. Requests from 
Buffalo Creek (St. John's, Cabarrus) and Indian Creek (St. Mark's, Gaston 
County) that they be received were unanimously granted. No proceedings 
were reported for the years 1807 and 1808. The attendance of ministers was 
so limited that business could not be properly transacted. However, John 
Ludwig Markert was ordained at the meeting held in Abbot's Creek Church 
in October, 1808. Synod met at Lau's Church on August 7, 1809. Only three 
ministers and eight delegates were present. The Rev. C. A. Storch was 
elected president, and the Rev. L. Markert was elected secretary. These 
must have been discouraging years for that band of faithful men who, 
in 1803, had covenanted together to work for the advancement of the 
Kingdom. Physical conditions made it difficult to hold regular and well 
attended meetings, and much of the time at such meetings as were held 
was taken up in an effort to correct prevailing abuses rather than in 
constructive action. 

But in spite of discouraging conditions, the churcli had been grow- 
ing. The eighth convention, held in Organ Church, October 22, 1810, 
gave evidence of renewed interest and a determination to prosecute the 
work more vigorously. Pastors present were: C. A. G. Storch, R. J. 
Miller, Philip Henkel, Ludwig Markert, and Gotlieb Shober, who, was, 
by the consent of all the pastors, ordained at this convention. Candidates 
and Catechists present were: J. M. Rickert, Jacob Grieson, Jacob Scherer, 
Godfrey Dreher, and William Hauk. Six lay delegates were present. 
Actions taken provided for more adequate records and an expansion of 
evangelistic effort. Instructions were given: to the president, to procure 
a seal for the Synod; to the president and secretary, to print extracts 
from the protocol which should include the names of every minister, of 
each congregation, and the names of elders and deacons of each church; 
to every pastor, to submit a report to the next meeting of Synod on the 
number of children he had baptized during his entire ministerial activity, 

* Paul Henkel's Diary, p. 110. 



History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 33 

also a short report about his various visits (journeys) so that an abstract 
might be sent to each pastor. Provision was made for the holding of 
three-day preaching services throughout the Synod at which voluntary 
collections should be taken to be applied to the support of traveling 
ministers. A resolution was also adopted to the effect that a traveling 
missionary be sent out, annually, and that in the event that he failed 
to secure enough to support himself, he be aided from the above proposed 
collections. The Rev. R. J. Miller's offer to serve as missionary until 
the next convention of Synod was accepted with thanks, and he was duly 
appointed and commended to the guidance of God. 

The ninth convention was held in St. John's Church, Lincoln County, 
on September 24, 1811. Due to a misunderstanding about the time of 
meeting, only three pastors were present. Officers were elected and rou- 
tine business was transacted; but because not all pastors were present, 
the following resolution was adopted: "That this meeting of Synod be 
continued by the holding of another meeting on the first Sunday in 
April of the next year (1812), and that the proceedings of the two meet- 
ings be considered as the convention of the year 1811." Parochial re- 
ports which had been called for at the previous convention contained the 
following information: Five pastors in North Carolina serving 30 congre- 
gations reported that, during their total of 51 and one-half years of service 
2,071 persons had been confirmed and 100 adults baptized. The minutes 
of this convention also contained the first financial report. Receipts 
from collections taken at the three days' preaching services amounted to 
$43.39, and Pastor Miller reported that he had received $70.44 toward his 
support as missionary from free-will offerings. Disbursements included 
$18.39 for printing minutes and $5.00 paid toward the support of Candi- 
date D. Moser. The Rev. G. Shober was elected treasurer, and was in- 
structed to keep an account of funds and to make an annual report to 
Synod. The list of congregations, together with their elders and deacons, 
was also submitted and is deemed of sufficient interest to be included here. 
The five congregations in South Carolina, all without pastors, which were 
reported, are not included. Congregations in Virginia and Tennessee, 
which were later added to the list, are also omitted. 



34 



History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 



CHURCH 



COUNTY 



ELDERS 



DEACONS 



Zion (Organ) 



Rowan 



Theobold Lentz 
Geo. Michael Heiliff 
Adam Steuerwald 
Adam Gruss 



GeorKe Huthman 
John Miller 
John Edelman 
Nicholas Beringer 



Buffalo Creek 
(St. John's) 



Cabarrus 



Nicholas Ridenauer 
John Beringer 
Jacob Bast 
Jacob Miller 



Peter Thiem 
Paul Beringer 
Martin Blackwalder 
John Ridohr 



Irish Settlement Rowan 

(Lutheran Chapel) 



Conrad Schlup 



John Setzer 
Michael Bastian 
John Kistler 
Tobias Guthmann 



Pine (Union) 


Rowan 




Jacob Braun 
Andrew Bauer 
George Froelich 


Crooked Creek 


Mecklenburg 




Ludwig Hardess 


(Morning Star) 








Bear Creek 


Stanly 


John Bernhard, 


Christopher Leyerli 


(Bethel) 




Lay Reader 


Henry Zeits 



Pilgrim 



Davidson 



Christian Meyer 
Valentine Tag 



Henry Conrad 
Peter Lapp 



Beck's 



Davidson 



John Beck 
David Beyrer 



Ephraim Gass 



Swicegood's 
(St. Luke'.s) 


Davidson 


Adam Schweisguth 
John Gabel 


Henry Ratz 
Philip Beck 


Lau's 


Guilford 


John Gobel 
Jacob Krieson 


Ludwig Lau 
John Philippi 


Frieden's 


Guilford 




John Gebel 
John Kob 


Grave's 

(St. Paul's) 


Alamance 




John Fogelman 
Melchior Essley 


Richland 


Randolph 


John Schwartz 
Jacob Krieson, 
Lay Reader 


Joseph Staley 


Muddy Creek 
(Shiloh) 


Forsyth 




Henry Holder 
Samuel Vogler 
John Krausser 



Dutchman's Creek 
(Reformation) 



Rowan 
(Davie) 



Nicholas Gluck 



Benjamin Henkel 
Henry Clement 



Lincoln 
(Catawba) 



John Eisenhauer 
John Stein 
Christopher Siegman 
Jacob Volbrecht 



Bernhard Siegman 
John Schmidt 



Old Church 


Lincoln 




John Schmeyer 


Salem 








School House 




Thomas Huber 


Jacob Klein 


(Daniel's) 




Abraham Hefner 


Peter Heil 
Daniel Lutz 


Kassner's 


Gaston 


John Huffman 


Jacob Straub 


(Philadelphia) 




Peter Rein 


Michael Kassner 


Lebanon 


Gaston 


Mathias Kilian 


Moses Baumgartner 


(Ore Bank) 








Emmanuel 


Lincoln 


G. G. Gerding 


George Risch 






Ludwig Hefner 


David Mastaller 


Hebron 


Cleveland 




Nicholas Eiler 


Zion 


Lincoln 




Benjamin Weitner 




( Catawba) 




Jacob Hahn 



History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 35 

Synod met again on October 18, 1812, in Lau's Church, Guilford 
County. According to previous action, this was regarded as the regular 
meeting for 1812 and as the tenth annual convention. During the years 
that followed, Synod met annually until 1817. No meeting was held in 
1818, and the one held in 1819 is known as the sixteenth convention. 
Much that was done at these meetings would be of interest, but only 
enough can be included here to suggest the process through which the 
Synod developed into an effective organization. When such conditions 
as bad roads, poor means of communication, epidemics of sickness, and 
other handicaps are recalled, the progress which its members made in 
their organized activities is remarkable. 

Even more remarkable is the story of growth and expansion. Indi- 
vidual pastors had long felt a responsibility for development along these 
lines and had endeavored to minister to the needs of groups far beyond 
the bounds of their own parishes, but they realized only too clearly that 
their most strenuous efforts were entirely inadequate to meet these needs. 
The burden of this responsibility and the belief that it could be more 
adequately met through organized effort, no doubt, had an important 
part in bringing about the organization of a Synod on the territory. 
Their belief was justified by the results that followed. The church was 
aroused and enthused, and the result was a rapid growth in numbers and in 
expanding territory. A glance at the early records will show how rapidly 
the new Synod grew. At the fourth convention, St. John's, Cabarrus, and 
Indian Creek (St. Mark's, Gaston County) were received, and 19 lay dele- 
gates were present. The minutes of the eighth convention indicate that one 
congregation in North Carolina and three in South Carolina had been re- 
ceived during the year. At the ninth convention, nine congregations in 
Tennessee were received; and at the tenth convention, Hopewell and Bethel 
congregations in Stokes County, North Carolina, and Sandy Run, in South 
Carolina, were added. At the eleventh convention twenty congregations in 
Virginia were admitted. During the next few years, others were added, and 
petitions were received from as far away as Ohio and Indiana, requesting 
that ministers visit them. In a letter which was read to the tenth conven- 
tion in 1812, the Rev. Paul Henkel described his active labors in Ohio, and 
acknowledged himself still to be a member of the North Carolina Synod. 
Reports of the traveling missionaries of the Synod reveal the wide extent 
and effectiveness of their services. Incomplete records make it impossible 
to measure the growth with any degree of accuracy; but there is no lack 
of evidence to indicate that, during this period, the hopes and prayers 
and labors of the Founding Fathers and their successors were abundantly 
rewarded. 

But challenging needs and a rapidly expanding program brought 
the new Synod face to face with serious problems. Not the least of 
these arose from the ever increasing demand for pastors to supply vacant 
congregations and to open new fields. As was the case in other parts 
of America, the Church in North Carolina had been entirely dependent 
upon the Church in Europe for its supply of ministers. These men were 
well educated and thoroughly prepared for their work; but the supply 



36 History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 

was never adequate, and by the end of the eighteenth century it had 
almost entirely ceased. The Church was, therefore, faced with the ne- 
cessity of providing a native ministry. Since there were no colleges and 
seminaries in this country in which they might be trained, and since 
there were practical difficulties which made it virtually impossible to send 
men to Germany for training, it was apparent that some plan must be 
devised whereby the need could be met until the time came when such 
institutions could be provided. 

The plan adopted, first by the Ministerium of Pennsylvania, and 
later by other Synods, came to be known as "The License System," a 
policy purely American in so far as the Lutheran Church was concerned. 
Under this system, men who appeared to have the necessary spiritual 
qualifications and natural endowments were selected and were licensed 
to perform certain ministerial functions, within prescribed limits and 
for some fixed length of time, while they were preparing for ordination. 
During this preparatory period, they were always under the supervision 
and instruction of one or more ordained ministers of the Synod. The system 
was not designed to provide an easy way through which men might enter 
the ministry, but to furnish a practical means by which the need of the 
Church for pastors could be supplied until more adequate facilities were 
available. While the plan admittedly fell far short of the high standards 
usually established by the Lutheran Church, and was open to abuse, it 
seemed to the leaders of that day to provide the only solution to the 
problem with which they were confronted; and perhaps its severest 
critics, had they been faced with similar conditions, could not have offered 
a better one. 

Since the plan was already an established policy in other parts of 
the Church at the time of the organization of the North Carolina Synod, 
it was apparently accepted without question by the men who formed the 
new body. At the convention held in Lincolnton, October 17, 1803, a 
petition from a Mr. Krieson, asking for the ordination of Philip Henkel, 
was presented; but in view of the candidate's youth, the request was not 
granted. At the second convention, John M. Rikert and Ludwig Markert 
were authorized to read sermons in vacant congregations, to pray, and 
in cases of necessity, to baptize children; and the license of Philip Henkel 
as a Catechist was renewed. At the convention in 1810, Candidates J. M. 
Rickert, Jacob Grieson, Jacob Scherer, and Godfrey Dreher received writ- 
ten license to preach, to baptize and instruct children in all Lutheran 
churches for one year. 

At first there were no published definite regulations under which 
licenses might be granted. Each case was considered on its merits, and 
action was determined by what, under the circumstances, seemed best; 
but the necessity for fixed and definite regulations soon became apparent. 
Prior to 1813, it was the custom to allow any two ministers, at their own 
will, and upon their own judgment, between conventions of Synod, to 
license young men to preach until the next meeting of Synod. At the 
convention that year, the following action was taken: "That it should 



History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 37 

no longer be the custom to allow two ministers the privilege, or power, 
to authorize a young man to preach and baptize. That, furthermore, 
hereafter no one receive full ministerial authority except alone by the 
Synod, and that after an examination, that every catechist and beginner 
shall be appointed, and that if found qualified and faithful, and acceptable 
to the congregations, he shall be considered and received as a candidate 
for the ministry, and shall receive written authority to preach for one 
year and administer the sacraments to his congregations, but no where 
else." The following resolution was adopted in 1814: "That hereafter 
no uneducated person shall receive license to preach until he has studied 
with one of our pastors and is twenty-one years of age." From time to 
time it was found necessary to adopt other regulations, usually as a 
result of differences of opinion as to some of the practices that were 
current under the plan, but it was not until 1869 that the License System 
was discontinued by the North Carolina Synod. 

The pressing need for ministers prompted at least two other actions 
that have often been questioned. Reference has already been made to 
the ordination, in 1794, of Robert Johnson Miller, a member of the Epis- 
copal Church, who was serving a mixed congregation in Lincoln County 
known as White Haven. Pastor Arends, who was serving a number of 
other congregations at the time, held occasional services there and evi- 
dently welcomed the assistance that Mr. Miller was able to give, and 
approved of the petition for his ordination. Sixteen years later, Gottlieb 
Shober, a member of the Moravian Church was, by the consent of all 
the pastors, ordained a Lutheran minister. Pastors present at this con- 
vention were: Storch, Philip Henkel, R. J. Miller, and Ludwig Markert. 
At the time, Mr. Shober was caring for Lutheran congregations in Stokes 
and neighboring counties who were without the services of a regular 
pastor. Whatever may have been his faults. Pastor Shober did give 
years of faithful service to the Lutheran Church in North Carolina and 
saved some of its congregations from complete disintegration, for example, 
St. John's, Salisbury. 

Perhaps neither the plan adopted to prepare more men for the 
ministry nor the actions by which two men who were not members of the 
Lutheran Church were ordained could be justified by a strict interpreta- 
tion of Lutheran policy. In each instance, however, the course was ap- 
proved by men who were faced with the practical problems of Kingdom 
building; men who were extending their efforts far beyond the ordinary 
call of duty, men who carried upon their hearts the burden of unchurched 
multitudes to whom they could not minister adequately; men who, 
wherever they turned, heard the oft-repeated call, "Send us a minister." 
Whether or not the course which they pursued was wise will always be 
a debatable question. That it was the source of much dissatisfaction 
and misunderstanding during the years that were to follow cannot be 
denied. On the other hand, there is no means of determining what the 
fate of the Lutheran Church in this new land would have been had the 
established standards and usages of the Mother Church been strictly 
adhered to. Christian charity demands that at least the sincerity of their 
motives be recognized and respected. 



38 History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 

But these deviations from historic practice were, in part, the out- 
growth of a more serious departure. It is generally agreed that the 
founders of the Lutheran Church in America brought with them a strong 
Lutheran consciousness and a high regard for her distinctive doctrines 
and usages. Dr. Socrates Henkel states that, "The most authentic records 
seem clearly to indicate that the church generally adhered to the doc- 
trines and principles of the Bible, as set forth and confessed in the Un- 
altered Augsburg Confession and Luther's Catechism."* It is also a gen- 
erally recognized fact that, by the end of the eighteenth century, the 
confessional position of the church had been modified, and that distinctive 
doctrinal emphasis was discounted or neglected. Again, various condi- 
tions had much to do with bringing this about. Various trends had de- 
veloped in Europe ranging from extreme rationalism which questioned 
the authority of the Bible to extreme Pietism which placed the emphasis 
upon pious living rather than on doctrinal purity. These disturbing ele- 
ments found their way to America and exerted a harmful influence upon 
the teaching of the Church. The environment into which the Church was 
thrust in the new land also contributed to this changed attitude. Indi- 
viduals had found it necessary to adjust themselves to an environment 
in which they were often closely associated with the adherents of other 
Faiths. Pastors, who were frequently poorly trained and always over- 
worked, felt the pressure to co-operate with those of other churches and 
to soften doctrinal distinctions. It is not strange, therefore, that organ- 
ized groups followed the same trend. Their constitutions were designed 
to meet practical problems, not to establish confessional principles. 

To a certain extent, developments in North Carolina paralleled 
those in other sections of the country. Lutherans who first came to the 
state reached here before the influences which did so much to undermine 
distinctive Lutheranism had become effective. It is to be assumed, there- 
fore, that they still preserved their strong Lutheran consciousness. The 
Commission of Rintleman and Layerly states that about sixty families, 
"adherents of the Augsburg Confession," sent them. Early pastors, who 
came a quarter century later, had been trained in Germany where strict 
orthodoxy was already being modified by current trends of thought. 
However, Nussmann, the first to arrive, had been trained as a Catholic 
priest, but had become confirmed in the doctrines and convictions of the 
Evangelical religion;** and the Constitution of St. John's, which he wrote, 
requires that the pastor "Accept with heart and mouth the Symbolical 
Books of the Evangelical Church; also to preach the doctrines contained 
in them." Arends did not have the benefit of a complete theological 
training and was no theologian, but he was loyal to the Lutheran Con- 
fessions. Storch received a thorough theological training in Germany, 
and in a letter to Velthusen in 1803 he writes, "I continue to preach the 
doctrines of Jesus Christ the Crucified, in simplicity, and have experienced 
the power of His grace upon myself and others." Paul Henkel never 
had the advantages afforded by a theological school, but he was well 

* History of the Tennessee Synod, p. 1. 
**Velthusen'3 Report. 



History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 39 

grounded in the Confessions of the Lutheran Church and strictly adhered 
to them. However, his relationships with pastors and people of other 
denominations were cordial and often co-operative, as is evidenced by 
many entries in his diary. Under the leadership of such men, a positive 
type of Lutheranism continued to prevail much longer than in some 
other sections of the country, notably New York and Pennsylvania, and 
never lost as much ground. 

It must be admitted, however, that Lutheranism in North Carolina 
did not entirely escape the effect of forces that were at work in both 
the European and American churches. These resulted in a tendency to- 
ward latitudinarianism and a lack of emphasis upon a distinctive confes- 
sional position. Neither the "North Carolina Catechism" which was gen- 
erally used before the Synod was organized, nor the book "Luther" which 
later received the approval of the Synod, are above criticism; and the 
absence from the first constitution of any clear cut doctrinal basis might 
be regarded as indicative of the lack of emphasis. This omission was 
not necessarily deliberate, for those who drafted the Constitution followed 
the precedent which had been established by the two Synods which had 
already been organized; and the Constitutions of the Ministeriums of 
New York and Pennsylvania did not contain such a basis then nor for 
many years thereafter. On the contrary, this weakness was recognized 
and, to some extent, corrected by subsequent actions. At the second con- 
vention the following was adopted: "Resolved, that twenty-one Articles 
of the Augsburg Confession be published for the benefit of the church." 
The minutes of the 1812 convention contain this: "In answer to the ques- 
tion, which catechism should be the basis of instruction? It was unani- 
mously resolved that Luther's Smaller Catechism must ever be the basis 
of catechetical instruction; and the catechism of Ambrosius Henkel, ex- 
plaining Luther's, can be used, but this is left to each pastor to do as 
he pleases." The Constitution was revised and enlarged in 1817 and 
Article I was made to read: "The first twenty-one articles of the Con- 
fession delivered to the assembled Diet at Augsburg, in Germany, by the 
Lutheran divines, known by the name of the Augsburg Confession, as 
extracted from the Bible, is the point of union of our church. Every 
minister, before ordination, pledges himself to the same." This revised 
constitution, twenty-two articles of the Augsburg Confession, and other 
material, were included in a book popularly called "Luther" which after- 
ward became the subject of much controversy because of its supposedly 
compromising and unionist tenor. 

This, in brief outline, is the story of the Synod's formative years. It 
was inevitable that the new Synod would not be able to solve all prob- 
lems and meet all expectations over night. The problems were too great, 
the resources were too limited, and the organization was too imperfect 
for that. Nevertheless, definite advance marked its early years. Its 
organization was strengthened, its boundaries were enlarged, and its 
influence was extended. Its founders were not super-men; but in most 
respects they built wisely and well, and the work that they did was 



40 History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 

destined to endure. The Lutheran Church in North Carolina will always 
be indebted to them for their foresight and faith and courage and for 
the foundation which they laid, a foundation that was to be shaken but 
not destroyed. 



History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 41 

CHAPTER IV 
Dissension and Division 



The young, active, and rapidly growing Synod had not yet reached 
its majority when a situation developed that resulted in the formation 
of a new Synod and left scars which time alone could efface. Avail- 
able records of what transpired at the time of the break and during 
the years that immediately preceded and followed it are so evidently 
colored by the feelings of those who wrote them that it is difficult 
to determine the cause of this unhappy separation or to place responsi- 
bility for it. Undoubtedly questions of doctrine and practice at issue 
justified grave concern and called for clarifying and constructive action. 
As has already been noted, the men who organized the Synod 
were more concerned about the practical problems with which they 
were confronted than about questions of doctrine, which were no 
v.'here in America being agitated at that time. Such declarations as 
were adopted from time to time, were not altogether adequate, and 
considerable latitude was allowed in their interpretation. Add to this 
the fact that two of the leading ministers of this period, the Rev. R. 
J. Miller and Gottlieb Shober, did not have a Lutheran background 
and never completely identified themselves with the Lutheran Church 
either formally or in spirit; and add the further fact that others who 
were admitted to membership had not, under the circumstances, 
received a thorough and systematic training in the finer points of 
Lutheran Theology; and you have a situation that was not altogether 
condusive to the preservation of distinctively Lutheran doctrine. It is 
not strange, therefore, that unionistic and compromising tendencies 
had developed which called for correction, and that un-Lutheran prac- 
tices were followed which needed to be checked. 

Questions at issue regarding practice centered in the so-called 
License System. This purely American practice was apparently ac- 
cepted without question by the Synod's organizers. Philip Henkel, 
whose name is included in the list of ministers who attended the 
Convention in Lincolnton on October 17, 1803, had been licensed by the 
Ministerium of Pennsylvania, as had been his father, Paul Henkel. A 
request that he be ordained at that meeting was not granted, in 
view of his youth; but his license as a catechist was renewed. He 
was not ordained until 1805. Custom, rather than rules, was at 
first generally followed; and regulations governing the practice were 
adopted only as problems connected with specific cases arose. The 
indefiniteness which characterized the terms under which the licenses 
were granted and the power which they conferred was sure to give 
rise to misunderstandings and differences of opinion, and to pave 
the way for future disagreement involving not only principles but 
also personalities. Thus a plan generally accepted in principle could 
and did prove troublesome in practice. 



42 History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 

The case of David Henkel served to bring out the weakness of 
the system as it was practiced. In accordance with the prevailing cus- 
tom, he was licensed, ad interim, as a catechist by two ministers. At 
the regular meeting in 1813, he presented himself before the Synod 
with a petition from Lincoln County, asking for the renewal of his 
license. There was apparently some hesitancy about doing this on 
account of his age. He was at the time only eighteen years old, 
the youngest man who had ever asked the Synod for a license. In 
spite of his youth, he passed a creditable examination and was granted 
a license for one year. This license was renewed in 1814, but a reso- 
lution was adopted at that convention providing, "That hereafter no 
uneducated person should receive license to preach until he has studied 
with one of our pastors and is twenty-one years of age." Action had 
been taken the previous year to the effect, "That after this it should 
no longer be the custom to allow two ministers the privilege, or power, 
to authorize a young man to preach and baptize." Had these and other 
regulations which were adopted within the next few years been in 
effect previously, much confusion and misunderstanding would 
undoubtedly have been avoided. As it was, the whole vexing question 
had to be considered under circumstances which were calculated to 
engender further misunderstanding rather than to contribute to a sound 
and wise policy. 

Had the issue been sound Lutheran doctrine and practice alone, 
and had the lines been clearly drawn, then the break would have been 
inevitable; and the full responsibility would have rested upon those 
who had deviated from the true Lutheran position. A fair appraisal 
of the records will, however, show that the conflict cannot be reduced 
to such simple terms and that neither side can be made to bear the 
whole responsibility. There is much to indicate that personal differ- 
ences between individual members were, after all, one of the under- 
lying causes which led to the rupture, and that these differences were 
most pronounced between Gottlieb Shober on the one side and David 
Henkel on the other, neither of which was disposed to yield to the other 
in any way. Dr. G. D. Bernheim, who wrote just fifty years after the 
final break, gives the following description of these men: 

"Rev. Shober was a man of decided opinions, unyielding in 
everything which he considered right, as may be seen from a sketch of 
his life in the Evangelical Review, vol. viii, pp. 412-44; 'With a mind 
that knew no dissimulation, a lofty independence, an ardent temper, 
and a character decidedly affirmative, he frequently experienced diffi- 
culties, and encountered points other than pleasant, in his pilgrimage 
through life, and which a disposition more pliant could have averted.' 
'He was one of the most active defenders of (the) General Synod, as 
he had also been prominent among its early founders.' 

"But Rev. Shober was no Lutheran, he was a member of the Mo- 
ravian Church, and never disconnected himself from communion with 
the same; he lived and died a member of that church. This informa- 
tion the writer received from his own daughter, the widow of Bishop 



History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 43 

Herrman. He merely served the Lutheran Church in the capacity of 
one of its ministers, being the pastor of several neglected Lutheran 
congregations in the vicinity of his residence, Salem, N. C. It may be 
readily perceived that no compromise could be expected on his part, 
ii) the difficulties which distracted the Lutheran Church at that time. 

"Firm as was the Rev. G. Shober, he found his equal, in that 
respect, in Rev. David Henkel, who, though a young man then, was 
equally as decided and unyielding in his opinions. He was a hard 
student and well educated, not only in the German and English 
languages, but also in Latin, Greek, Hebrew and Theology, all of 
which he had principally acquired by private study and close appli- 
cation. He was the best informed candidate for the ministry the North 
Carolina Synod had at that time, and wielded even then a considerable 
influence in the church. It is not to be supposed that he would readily 
y:eld his opinions to others, or permit himself to be led about at the 
will of even those who were older than himself, when he believed his 
cause to be just. In him the Tennessee Synod had a champion who 
could not be easily overcome. He had a mind that was clear, active 
and penetrating; he was quick in discerning an advantage, and not 
slow to make use of it. These characteristics are gathered principally 
from his own writings."* 

In fairness to all, it should be noted that Gottlieb Shober was not a 
Lutheran Theologian and that the distinctive doctrines and the historic 
practices of the Lutheran Church were not regarded by him as of 
primary importance, his views, however, did not represent the official 
position of the North Carolina Synod, and there is no evidence that this 
position of the Synod was ever at variance with the historic doctrines of 
the Lutheran Church. He was conscientiously interested in the growth 
of the church and served faithfully to that end. He was president of 
the North Carolina Synod for nine terms. He believed, however, that 
the desired end could be accomplished best by cooperating with other 
Lutheran groups and with other denominations even though this might 
call for compromise on questions of doctrine. He felt the need of a 
united Lutheran Church and a united Protestantism in America, and he 
worked untiringly, often unwisely, to bring this about. He failed to 
see that the real strength of the Lutheran Church always had and 
always would depend upon its fidelity to the truth as interpreted in its 
Confessions. 

On the other hand, David Henkel was familiar with the historic 
Confessions and practices of his church and came to believe that only 
by faithful adherence to them could the Lutheran Church hope to sur- 
vive and grow. He became their champion and worked zealously, some- 
times unwisely, to preserve and protect them and the church which 
he loved. 

Both of these men were fundamentally sincere, but neither of 
them seenred to realize the extent to which he was influenced by his 
personal views and experiences, or to recognize the inconsistencies of 

♦ Bernheim, p. 441-443. 



44 History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 

his own activities. Shober was "no Lutheran", yet he undertook to 
determine the policy which the Lutheran Church should follow. Henkel 
was a "strict Lutheran", yet he and his associates originally gave their 
approval to the book called "Luther" which Shober had prepared and 
which they later so severely critcized. The committee appointed at the 
fifteenth Convention (1817) to examine the manuscript of this book was 
composed of R. J. Miller, Philip Henkel, and Joseph E. Bell who re- 
ported, "That they recommended that 1,500 be printed and bound, 
as they considered it a very useful and much needed work and calculated 
to make our church known better and they also recommended that it 
be published at Synod's expense." This report was adopted without any 
opposition. The same inconsistency is revealed on the question of ordi- 
nation. David Henkel was first licensed through an arrangement that had 
only custom to support it, and not until he was later disappointed by 
Synod's failure to ordain him did he openly question the soundness of the 
system under which he had been granted privileges which he un- 
hesitatingly exercised. 

It would, however, be unfair to place all responsibilities for the 
division on these two men, or on either of them. While they were the 
recognized leaders of the two factions, and while each allowed personal 
feelings and prejudices to drive him to extremes that made reconcilia- 
tion difficult; the points at issue were vital, and so long as they remained 
undecided, no harmony was possible. However, had the personalities 
of Storch on the one side, and Paul and Philip Henkel on the other, 
been dominant at the time, the outcome might have been different. The 
unity of the church in North Carolina might have been preserved, and 
the needed changes might have been worked out within the one Synod. 
But Storch was in poor health and had been forced to allow others to 
assume much of the responsibility of leadership; Paul Henkel was 
advanced in years and was no longer living in the state; and Philip 
Henkel lacked some of the intellectual brilliance and unyielding aggres- 
siveness of his young brother David. 

Paul Henkel, who usually wrote so fully in his Diary about his 
activities and experiences, is strangely silent about much that took 
place. The following, a part of which seems to have been supplied by 
the translator, is the only entry covering the momentous period from 
May to September, 1820: 

"Sunday, May the 28th. Attended the annual convention of the 
North Carolina Synod. After religious exercises, all participated in 
the first business session of the Synod, after which the separation took 
place: all the members living in Tennessee (except J. E. Bell), and Paul 
and David Henkel, with their lay delegates, decided to meet in Ten- 
nessee in July to form a new Synod. This was the last meeting of the 
North Carolina Synod attended by the Henkels. Philip Henkel was 
absent but was included as one of the pastors living in the state 
cf Tennessee. May 29th to July 17th, Paul Henkel and his wife spent 
the time visiting their sons Philip and David. 



History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 45 

"Monday, July 17, 1820. Paul Henkel and the pastors interested 
in the formation of a Lutheran Synod for the State of Tennessee met 
and discussed a plan of union, which was adopted. For the third time 
Paul Henkel participated as a leader in the organization of a Synod: 
North Carolina in 1803; Ohio in 1818; and now Tennessee in 1820. 

"Saturday, August 12, 1820. Wife and I drove off for our home in 
New Market today."* 

The actual break did not come until 1820, but events which led 
up to it and circumstances which attended these events are an essential 
part of the story. They are presented here in sequence and with an 
effort to preserve a degree of objectivity that should be possible after 
tne lapse of more than 130 years. 

At the eleventh Convention (1813), the question was raised as 
to whether candidates should be allowed to administer the sacraments 
before ordination. It had previously been the custom to . permit them 
lo do this. The point was referred to the next meeting of Synod, and 
Vi'hen it was again brought up, a previous action permitting them to do 
this was reaffirmed. At the thirteenth Convention, the question as to 
whether all who are admitted or authorized to serve in our congrega- 
tions should be consecrated (ordained) by the laying on of hands was 
brought before the Synod. Again, action was deferred until the next 
meeting of Synod, and at this meeting Synod's position on the License 
System was reaffirmed and it was resolved, "To follow the practice of 
cur honored ministerial brethren in Pennsylvania in regard to grades or 
orders." As a concession to the petitioners from Lincoln county who 
contended that no one should be permitted to administer the sacra- 
ments without having been fully ordained by the laying on of hands, 
3 new procedure effective for one year was approved. President Storch 
alone dissenting. In accordance with the provisions of this action, all 
candidates, including David Henkel, were handed their usual licenses 
with full powers, with the benediction and imposition of hands, but 
were not regarded as ordained ministers. David Henkel had expected 
t«.- be ordained at this Convention but, in view of the agitation over 
the ordination question, the request was not granted. 

The next Convention (1817) marked the three hundredth anniver- 
sary of the Reformation, and a reasonable degree of harmony seemed 
to prevail. However, several actions were taken which were destined 
to have a bearing on future developments. At its Convention the previous 
year. Synod had instructed its Secretary to prepare the manuscript for 
a book containing a history of the Reformation, the growth and exten- 
sion of the church, its cultus, rules and regulations, with short ab- 
stracts thereof, also the Augsburg Confession, and citations and stories 
from Luther's writings regarding his doctrines and character. This is 
the book which was later known as "Luther". The manuscript sub- 
mitted was reviewed by a committee and approved for publication and 

* Paul Henkel's Diary, p. 386. 



46 History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 

distribution. The question as to whether the rule and regulation (prac- 
tice) granting permission to candidates to administer the sacraments 
(doing so without the laying on of hands, i. e., without ordination) be 
continued was considered and, by vote, it was decided that it be retained 
in force. Five ministers voted for it and the Rev. R. J. Miller against it. 
A desire was expressed that, since the fall was so often a sickly time, 
the time for holding the Convention of Synod be changed to the Spring. 
This was done with the consent of all the delegates, and the time for 
the next meeting was fixed on the first Trinity Sunday in 1819. 

This last action proved to be particularly unfortunate. As a result, 
ii-j meeting of Synod was provided for during the year 1818. Had there 
been a meeting at the usual time of year, at least some of the circum- 
stances which led up to the rupture might have been avoided. The 
proposal of the Ministerium of Pennsylvania that, if possible, a more 
intimate union of all Synods of the Lutheran Church in the United 
States be effected, might have received due and deliberate consideration 
at a full meeting; the matter of ordaining candidates could have been 
disposed of in regular order; and, further, there would have been no 
occasion for a change in the "firmly fixed" time for the next meeting 
of Synod. Unfortunately, no one seemed to have anticipated these 
problems when all delegates consented to the change. 

In the meantime, the call from the Pennyslvania Synod to consult 
v/ith that body, during its sessions in Baltimore on Trinity Sunday, 
1819, about the propriety of organizing a general Synod was officially 
received by the Secretary. Since compliance with this request on the 
part of the North Carolina Synod would necessitate an earlier meeting, 
the officers of Synod decided to advance the time of meeting six weeks, 
and to notify the ministers of this change. Although there was no 
authority for such a change, it would most likely have been allowed 
to pass unchallenged had it not been for the strained relations that 
already existed within the Synod which were further aggravated by 
actions taken at the meeting. This meeting, sometimes referred to as 
"the untimely meeting", was held in St. John's church, Cabarrus county, 
beginning on April 26, 1819. Six pastors, three candidates, five catechists 
and twelve lay delegates were present. Four pastors and six candidates 
and catechists were absent. The reason for the change in time of meet- 
ing was explained and it was unanimously agreed to allow and sanction 
this Synod as the Synod of 1819. Secretary G. Shober was elected to 
attend the meeting of the Pennyslvania Synod and, if possible, favor, 
in the name of the Synod, the proposed union. He was given power 
to act, provided the Constitution adopted should be in accordance with 
iiistructions which he had received from the Synod. In case resolu- 
tions were adopted differing from his instructions, such resolutions 
were to be presented at the next meeting o'^ Synod for ratification or 
rejection. Complaints were made to the Synod against David Henkel, 
especially by Andrew Hoyle, Esq. and by several Presbyterian preachers. 
These complaints, which seem to have arisen as a result of the youthful 
ardor with which David Henkel had championed his views on Luth- 



History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 47 

eran doctrines and practices which had produced discord within his own 
congregations and resentment on the part of other members of the 
community, were examined and discussed at length in the pres- 
ence of the accused David Henkel. In view of the fact that some of 
the charges were substantiated, others were not, he was reduced from 
the position of candidate to that of catechist, and was given a license for 
twelve months with the provision that, "If at the expiration of six monhs, 
he can bring a written statement from his congregations that peace 
among them had been restored, and no more serious complaints be 
presented against him, then the President of Synod shall grant him a 
license as candidate." With this decision David Henkel expressed him- 
self as being satisfied, promised to do better, and according to all ap- 
pearances reconciled himself with Mr. Hoyle* 

The actions of this convention were in order and could not have 
been questioned if it had been held at the time decided upon at the 
previous meeting. That such a change was irregular cannot be dis- 
puted, and that it was unwise is fully borne out by events that followed. 
On the following Trinity Sunday, the time agreed upon in 1817 for this 
ye:ar's meeting, the Rev. Philip Henkel, Candidate Joseph E. Bell, Catechist 
David Henkel, and seven lay delegates met at St. John's church, Cabar- 
rus county, the place appointed in 1817 for the 1819 convention. A dele- 
gation was appointed to visit President Storch who was then living in 
nearby Rowan county, with a written request that he come to the 
church, "In order that everything might be arranged and done in a 
regular and orderly manner." Storch excused himself on the ground 
that he was not very well, but called their attention to the fact that the 
Synod had already been held and that there was no need for holding 
it over again. He finally agreed that the church might be opened for 
preaching but not for any Synodical business. Services were held in 
the church after which the group met under r.everal shade trees nearby. 
Petitions from David Henkel's congregations requesting that he be 
oidained were considered. Whereupon David Henkel and Candidate 
J. E. Bell were oidained by the Rev. Philip Henkel.* This action was 
justified on the ground that Synod, at its 1817 convention, had provided 
foi the ordination of David Henkel and other candidates on Trinity 
Sunday, 1819. The charges that had been brought against David Henkel 
at the meeting held six weeks earlier were apparently ignored. 

The seventeenth convention of Synod, which began on May 28, 
1820, was held in Emmanuel Church, at Lincolnton. Services were 
held in both German and English and the Holy Communion was 
celebrated. It was announced that Synod would meet for business 
at nine o'clock the next day. At this session, the Minutes of the 
convention held on April 26, 1819, were read in both languages. Presi- 
dent Storch's suggestion that since mistakes had been made on both 

* The facts presented in this paragraph were gathered from the Minutes of the 
1819 Convention of the North Carolina Synod. 

* History of the Tennessee Synod, pp. 16-17. 



48 History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 

sides everything be forgotten, precipitated an angry discussion which 
was only ended by the adoption of a resolution to adjourn to meet 
again in the afternoon. The one party to which David Henkel be- 
longed, remained in the building; and after some deliberation and 
consultation, adjourned. The other withdrew to a nearby hotel and 
proceeded to organize the convention by electing the Rev. C. A. G. 
Storch, President, and Gottlieb Shober, Secretary. On Tuesday, May 
30, the Synod met in the church. Seven pastors, three candidates, 
and three catechists, and eighteen lay delegates were present. By 
more than a two-thirds majority of the members present, everything 
done in the Synod of 1819 was ratified anew as was the Constitution, 
as contained in the book "Luther", with the exception of principles or 
rules changed since then. Candidate J. E. Bell presented himself before 
the Synod, acknowledged his error in submitting to ordination by the 
Rev. Philip Henkel, contrary to the regulations of Synod, and asked 
to be reinstated. The Synod then decided, first, that his previous ordi- 
nation was illegal and invalid; and, second, that in view of his repent- 
ence and confession, and his promise to remain loyal to the Lutheran 
church and faithful to his ordination vows, his ordination be made valid 
by the Synod. The proposal that David Henkel's ordination be made 
valid was rejected, since he himself, had shown no inclination to submit 
to the regulations of Synod and had made no request for reinstatement. 

The final break toward which events had been leading took place 
at the convention in Lincolnton on May 29, 1820. The one group con- 
tinued as the North Carolina Synod and proceeded with the transaction 
of its regular business. The other group met again on July 17 of the 
same year, in Solomon's church, Greene county, Tennessee, and organized 
a new Synod. The separation between the two contending parties was 
now fully effected, and both Synods continued to labor industriously in 
their chosen spheres of operation; but the bitter spirit which had devel- 
oped continued to manifest itself for many years, and the overlapping 
fields of activity gave frequent occasion for its continued expression. 

An effort has been made to trace the steps which led up to and 
accompanied this first outward break among the Lutherans who, for 
nearly twenty years, had worked together in one organization. This 
has not been easy, and perhaps not too successful, for such original 
records as are available clearly reflect the paitisan sympathies of their 
authors. Any effort at interpretation would encounter the same diffi- 
culties, and it is perhaps better to follow the example of Paul Henkel 
and omit any such effort entirely. Members of a reunited body who have 
worked together in harmony for more than thirty years can well afford 
to forget much of the unpleasantness of those days. The unfortunate 
effects of what took place are so obvious and so well known that they 
need not be recounted here. Less obvious is the fact that its effects were 
not altogether negative. Many have recognized this but none more 
clearly than did Dr. G. D. Bernheim. Sufficient time had lapsed when 
he wrote to allow the constructive results to become apparent and not 



History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 49 

enough to obscure them. His observations are, therefore, of sufficient 
merit to be recorded here. He writes: 

"Although divisions in the church are always to be dreaded, and, 
except in cases of doctrinal differences, always to be avoided, never- 
theless, when they do occur, they sometimes effect good in vitalizing 
dormant energies, and in re-establishing the pure faith of the Gospel. 
Such was the case in this division; it increased the number of ministers, 
it provided for the wants of so many neglected congregations, it made 
ministers and laymen all the more energetic, zealous and faithful in 
the discharge of their duties, and it resulted in an enlarged increase in 
the strength of the church."* 

He then goes on to point out that God made use of this division 
in the church to accomplish a special purpose for the Lutheran church 
in America. It served to attract attention once more to the pure doc- 
trines of the Lutheran church as confessed by the early Reformers, and 
to arrest a gradual yet evident departure from the confessed faith and 
practices of the church. It further resulted in the translation of the 
Symbols of the Lutheran church into the English lauguage. While there 
was a manifest desire on the part of many to make the Lutheran church 
in America an English church, as well as a German church, no effort 
had been made to Anglicize its faith, that is, to translate its Confessions 
and Theology into the English language. Special credit is due the Ten- 
nessee Synod for undertaking this work which has done so much in pre- 
serving the faith of the fathers in this country, and to the Henkel 
Publishing House at New Market, Virginia, for undertaking its publi- 
cation and distribution. 

These constructive efforts extended far beyond the bounds of the 
two Synods, although theii effect was noticeable in the development 
ar;d work of both. Indirectly, they did much to influence the American 
Lutheran church to follow the course which ultimately led to a truly 
Lutheran position. Whether these ends could have been attained by a 
smoother process and with less bitterness will never be known, for "What 
might have been" is not a part of history. 

Prior to 1820, Lutheran development in North Carolina followed 
a single course. The first congregations maintained informal relation- 
ships and the early pastors enjoyed a similarly informal fellowship. 
The organization of a Synod drew both pastors and congregations closer 
together and enabled them to serve the interests of the church in the 
state more effectively and to extend their efforts into adjacent states. 
This situation made a unity and continuity of treatment both possible and 
natural. The separation in 1820 resulted in an entirely different situa- 
tion, and for a century two distinct Synods operated on the same field, 
each engaging in its own activities and pursuing its own course of devel- 
opment. To a certain extent, the fields of the two Synods overlapped, 

* History of the Tennessee Synod, pp. 443-444. 



50 History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 

and the development was parallel: but their activities were entirely 
distinct and must be followed through separately until they again con- 
verge at the end of the period. During the first half of this period, three 
additional Synods, made up in part of congregations that had at one 
time been a part of the original North Carolina Synod, were organized; 
but they need to be considered only in connection with the Synod of which 
they were a part at the time of their organization. 



History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 51 

CHAPTER V 

The North Carolina Synod 
1820 - 1920 

The line of development in the North Carolina Synod after 1820 
was, in reality, a continuation of the phase which had begun with 
the organization in 1803. The Synod continued to operate under the 
rules and regulations already adopted. At the convention held in 1820, 
it elected its officers and transacted its regular business as though 
nothing had happened. Subsequent changes in its constitution and 
policies were simply the result of later developments and were effected 
in a normal procedure. Twice within the next quarter century it lost 
ministers and congregations through the organization of new Synods; 
but its essential identity was not affected, and its development was 
pot seriously retarded or deflected. To a certain extent, the same may 
be said about the formation of the Tennessee Synod. The chief differ- 
ences were that this separation resulted from internal conditions rather 
than from normal territorial expansion, and that it was attended by 
bitterness rather than by fraternal understanding and good will. This 
left the two bodies each emphasizing points of difference and each con- 
tending for the same fields even down to the congregational and 
individual level: and while it did give rise to vexing problems, it did 
not radically change the course of developmient in the mother Synod. 

The formation of the Tennessee Synod resulted in the immediate 
loss to the North Carolina Synod of two ordained ministers, three 
licentiates, and nine congregations located in Tennessee. Other con- 
gregations, especially those west of the Catawba river, united with the 
new Synod within a few years. Still, the parochial report of the North 
Carolina Synod for 1821 carried the names of eleven ordained ministers, 
and twelve deacons, candidates, and catechists. These reported 578 
children and 39 adults baptized and 189 young people confirmed. No 
list of congregations is given, and it is impossible to determine the 
exact number; but it has been estimated that there were about fifty 
with a membership of between four and five thousand.* This included 
congregations in Virginia and South Carolina and possibly in other 
states. The report would indicate that, in spite of the losses suffered, 
the numerical strength of the Synod was not seriously reduced at 
that time. 

Conditions existed, however, that were not conducive to a smooth 
and progressive development. Losses were by no means limited to 
those suffered in 1820-1821. Pastors and entire congregations continued 
to withdraw, and in other instances, congregations were disrupted. 
One group of members would remain loyal to the North Carolina Synod 

* History of N. C. Synod, p. 41. 



52 History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 

while another would become affiliated with the Tennessee Synod. 
This resulted in material losses and kept alive and stirred up the fires 
of controversy. 

Further than that, the withdrawal of the more conservative 
leaders served to unbalance the relative strength of groups represent- 
ing divergent trends, and to give an advantage to those who were more 
concerned about the promotion of ecclesiastical union than the preser- 
vation of sound Lutheranism. This was evident from the action of 
the Synod taken at the 1820 convention after the break had occurred. 
Pastor Shober presented his report as Synod's representative to the 
Pennsylvania Synod at its meeting the previous year. He stated that a 
plan had been agreed upon setting forth how all Synods could join in 
one General Synod; but he called attention to the fact that the plan, 
which had been printed and had been circulated among' members of 
the Synod, did not fully agree with instructions by the Synod. He 
further pointed out that the Synod was under no obligation to adopt it. 
The desire for such a union, however, was so strong that the plan was 
considered by item and was adopted by a vote of sixteen yeas and 
six nays. Two ministers and two lay delegates were elected, according 
to the provisions of the plan, to meet with the representatives of other 
Synods that same year, in Hagerstown, Maryland, to unite with them 
in the adoption of a constitution and the formation of a General Synod. 

An even more radical action was to follow. For some time, a 
cordial relationship had been maintained between the Synod and mem- 
bers of the Protestant Episcopal church in the state. This had been 
due, in part, to the influence of the Rev. R. J. Miller. At the convention 
of Synod held in 1821, it was reported, "That the Rev. R. J. Miller, 
who for many years, faithfully served our church as a minister, took 
friendly leave of our Ministerium, in view of the fact that he had 
united with the English Episcopal church, and had been consecrated 
priest by the Bishop." Whereupon, the Synod, "Resolved, that the presi- 
dent, in the name of our church, tender him thanks for his many years 
of service." The extent and value of this service was outstanding. 
For more than a quarter of a century, he served faithfully as a pastor 
and was one of the four ministers who took part in the organization of 
the Synod in 1803. At various times, he served as its secretary or its 
president, and as its traveling missionary. His journals covering his 
activities in the latter capacity, which were handed in at the annual 
meetings of Synod and were printed in its Minutes, gave detailed 
information about his work and are a source of valuable information 
about conditions at that time. From 1821 until his death in 1834, he 
continued to serve Episcopal congregations in Caldwell, Iredell and 
Rowan counties. He was a man of sterling character and was highly 
respected by all who knew him, regardless of their church affiliations. 
One daughter, Catherine, married the Rev. Godfrey Dreher. 

At this same convention in 1821, the Revs. Adam Empie and G. T. 
Bedell, and Duncan Cameron, representing the English Episcopal church, 
appeared before the Synod with a proposal that if possible, a union 



History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 53 

between the churches be effected. In connection with their appoint- 
ment, the Journal of the Episcopal North Carolina Convocation refers 
to, "That, truly respectable denomination, the Lutherans." * This 
delegation was affectionately received, and a committee consisting of 
The Revs. G. Shober and M. Rauch, and Henry Ratz, Esq., was chosen 
to consult with them on a plan of union. The next day they submitted 
the following plan: 

"I. Resolved, That we deem it expedient and desirable that the 
Lutheran Synod and the Protestant Episcopal church of North Carolina 
should be united together in closest bonds of friendship. 

"II. Resolved, That for this purpose we will mutually make such 
consessions as may not be inconsistent with the rules and regulations 
of our respective churches, for the purpose of promoting a friendly 
intercourse. 

"III. Resolved, That the convention of the Protestant Episcopal 
church may send a delegation of one or more persons to the annual Synod 
01 the Lutheran church, which person or persons shall be entitled to 
an honorary seat in that body, and to the privilege of expressing their 
opinions and voting in all cases except when a division is called for; 
in which case they shall not vote. 

"IV. Resolved, That the Lutheran Synod may, in like manner, 
send a deputation to the convention of the Protestant Episcopal church, 
who in all respects shall be entitled to the same privileges. 

"V. Resolved, That all the ministers of the Lutheran church 
in union with the Synod shall be entitled to honorary seats in the 
convention of the Protestant Episcopal church; and the clergymen of 
the said last-mentioned church shall, in like manner, be entitled to 
honorary seats in the Synod of the Lutheran church. 

"The committee respectfully recommended to the convention of 
the Protestant Episcopal church, and to the Synod of the Lutheran 
church the adoption of the foregoing resolutions." 

This report was adopted by the Synod at that convention, and 
b} the convention of the Episcopal church held in Raleigh, April 18, 
1822. Representatives were elected by each body to attend the meeting 
of the other. The plan of union must not have proven feasible, for 
nothing more about it appears in the Minutes. However, there is 
no record of its having ever been revoked. 

Efforts to strengthen and enlarge the work of the Synod through 
the establishment of relations with other groups were, to a certain 
extent, offset by losses due to the organization of new Synods. The 
first occurred in 1824. The pastors of North Carolina had, almost 
from the beginning, manifested an interest in their brethren in 
the faith who had settled in South Carolina, and some of them had 

* Bernheim's History, p. 458. 



54 History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 

made frequent visits to that state. As a result of their efforts, a num- 
ber of congregations were organized, particularly in the Lexington and 
Orangeburg districts. After the organization of the North Carolina Synod, 
these congregations and their pastors gradually became affiliated with the 
new body. The name of the Rev. Christopher Bernhardt is listed among 
the pastors who attended the fourth convention, and he was elected its 
secretary at that meeting. The minutes of the eighth convention state 
that, "The following congregations from South Carolina have united 
with our Synod: Bethel church, St. Peter's church, and Zion church." 
Among the candidates present at the ninth convention were J. P. 
Franklow and Godfrey Dreher from South Carolina. By the year 1824, 
the work in that state had developed to a point where the organization 
of a new Synod seemed desirable, "Accordingly, on January 14, 1824, the 
following clergymen of the Evangelical Lutheran church met at St. 
Michael's church, Lexington district, with the intention of organizing a 
Synod for South Carolina and adjacent states, namely: Revs. John P. 
Franklow, John Y. Meetze, Godfrey Dreher, Michael Rauch, Jacob Moser, 
all residing in the Lexington district, and Rev. Samuel Herscher of the 
Orangeburg district. South Carolina."* All these men were, at the 
time, members of the North Carolina Synod. After due consideration, 
those present unanimously resolved, "That the situation and wants 
of the Evangelical Lutheran churches in 'South Carolina' require that 
a Synod be now organized." 

The minutes of the North Carolina Synod (1825) contain the fol- 
lowing: "The ministers in South Carolina have since our last conven- 
tion organized themselves into a body of their own, and report now 
in our letter that they wish to cooperate v/ith us in love and unity. 
Our president will report to them that this is our wish." Thus the first 
normal and peaceful separation from the mother Synod of the South 
was consummated, and the harmony which was desired by all con- 
tinued to prevail. While it resulted in a substantial loss to the North 
Carolina Synod in members and territory, its salutary effect upon the 
whole church fully justified the policy which it initiated. 

Eighteen years later, the Synod was again confronted with a 
similar situation. As has been previously indicated, Lutherans in Vir- 
ginia and East Tennessee south and west of the James river early sought 
fellowship with their brethren in North Carolina, and North Carolina 
pastors felt a definite responsibility toward them. Paul Henkel made 
several trips through this territory and did much to hold them together. 
R. J. Miller included it in his itinerary as traveling missionary; and 
he and his associate, Jacob Scherer, turned the attention of the shep- 
herdless congregations in South Western Virginia to the North Carolina 
Synod. As a result, twenty congregations applied for admission into 
the Synod and were received at its convention held in 1813. These 
were served, partly by the Rev. Peter Schmucker and partly by visiting 
pastors. The Synod held its twenty-third convention in Zion church, 

* Bernheim's History, p. 467. 



History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 55 

Botetourt county, Virginia. Its twenty-sixth was held in St. John's; 
its thirty-first in St. Paul's; its thirty-fifth in Zion, and its thirty- 
eighth in St. Peter's, all churches in Wythe county, Virginia. 

According to the history of the Lutheran church in Virginia and 
East Tennessee, "At the thirty-seventh convention of the North Carolina 
Synod held in St. Michael's church, Iredell county, N. C, October 3, 
1840, a petition was presented by the ministers and lay delegates in 
southwest Virginia, asking permission to form their congregations into 
a separate Synod. The petition was signed by the pastors Jacob 
Scherer and Elijah Hawkins, the licentiates John J. Greever and Gideon 
Scherer, and the lay delegates Michael Brown of Wythe county, John 
Grosclose of Smythe county, and Stephen Sprecher of Burke's Garden. 
The Synod in a generous spirit granted the request, and the persons 
named agreed to meet in St. John's church, Wythe county, Va., on 
the 20th day of September, 1841, in order to make preliminary arrange- 
ments for the contemplated union. This was done; a committee was 
appointed to draft a constitution and the congregations were requested 
to elect lay delegates for the first meeting to be held in May, 1842, in 
Zion church, Floyd county, Va. 

"Fifteen congregations which had previously been members of the 
North Carolina Synod united to form the new Synod. Their names and 
county locations are as follows: In Wythe county, Zion, St. Paul's, 
St. Peter's, Kimberling, St. John's, Bethel, and Sharon; in Tazewell coun- 
ty, Burke's Garden; in Botetourt county; Union and Cop's; in Roanoke 
county, Zion and Glade Creek; in Floyd county, Zion; in Smythe county. 
Pleasant Hill and Chilhowie. At the first convention, two more applied 
for admission and were gladly received."* 

Of the six ministers who took part in the organization meeting 
on September 20, 1842, two, Jacob Scherer and Elijah Hawkins, 
were ordained ministers of the North Carolina Synod; and two, J. J. 
Greever and Gideon Scherer, were licentiates of the same Synod. 
Again the North Carolina Synod had suffered the loss of members and 
territory; but once more the new organization carried with it the bless- 
ings of the mother Synod under whose care it had reached the age of 
self-determination and self-support. 

In this connection, reference should be made to a third Synod 
v/hich was formed under the guidance and with the blessing of the 
North Carolina Synod, even though it did not come into existance 
until a much later period. Almost from the beginning, the Synod 
recognized its responsibility for the spiritual care of members of the 
Negro race who, under the institution of slavery, were so closely con- 
nected with the people who made up its congregations. At its twelfth 
convention, the following was adopted: "Resolved, That it is our duty 
to preach the Gospel to Negroes, and after proper instruction to admit 
them to all the means of Grace of the church, and for this purpose to 

* History of Lutheran Church in Va., East Tenn., p. 114-115. 



56 History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 

make room for them in our churches." It was further declared, "That 
Masters are, in love, requested to grant liberty to their slaves for this 
purpose, and herewith it is placed on record that it is the duty of 
masters to have them instructed in Christianity." For several years, 
beginning in 1819, the num.ber of slaves was reported separately. Fifty 
baptisms were reported in 1819, forty in 1820, seven slaves and one In- 
dian in 1822, and three in 1824. No further separate reports are given, 
but the practice of receiving slaves and of allowing them to worship 
with their masters was continued until after the close of the War Be- 
tween the States. 

Changed conditions that followed the freeing of the slaves made 
some other arrangement necessary. At the convention of the North 
Carolina Synod in 1868, the following action was taken: "Resolved, 
That a committee of two clergymen be appointed to prepare a report 
on the Relation of the Church to the Freedmen." The committee com- 
posed of the Revs. W. Artz and G. D. Bernhei.m was appointed and re- 
ported that at the time it could offer nothing better than the plan 
adopted by the Evangelical Lutheran Synod of Tennessee. This plan 
which was adopted by the Tenenssee Synod in 1867 and is included in 
the sketch of that Synod elsewhere in this narative, was immediately 
adopted unanimously. At the same convention in 1868, Michael M. 
Coble presented a certificate of recommendation signed by a number 
ot responsible persons, members of the Lutheran church, and applied 
for license to preach the Gospel and administer the sacraments. The 
ministerium referred the application to a special committee with power 
to act. The committee granted him a license which provided that he 
should work under the care and advice of the Rev. C. H. Bernheim 
who was instructed to withdraw the license if at any time the condi- 
tions under which it was granted were not strictly observed. The com- 
mittee reported to the ministerium the next year that the said Coble 
had served two congregations acceptably and recommended the renewal 
or continuance of his conditional license. This procedure was followed 
for several years, although the Synod had discontinued the practice 
of granting licenses to white candidates in 1869. Negroes who were 
later ordained were D. J. Koontz in 1880, Nathan Clapp and Samuel 
Holt in 1884, and W. P. Phifer, who was approved in 1889 and ordained 
in 1890. 

These four Negro ministers, together with the lay representatives 
from their congregations, at the meeting of Synod in 1889, asked to 
be formed into a separate Synod of their own. A special committee, 
consisting of the Revs. W. G. Campbell, F. W. E. Peschau, George H. Cox, 
and T. S. Brown, was appointed, who reported to Synods as follows: 

"We your committee apponted to organize the Colored Evangelical 
Lutheran Synod, met in the council room of St. John's Evangelical 
Lutheran congregation, Cabarrus county, N. C, on Wednesday, May 8th, 
1889, at 11:30 A. M. Rev. W. G. Campbell, the chairman, called the 
committee to order. Rev. George H. Cox was elected secretary. After 
prayer by Rev. F. W. E. Peschau, the colored brethren were organized 



History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 57 

and constituted under the name and title of 'The Alpha Synod of the 
Evangelical Lutheran Church of Freedmen in America.' 

"The Constitution of the North Carolina Synod was then adopted 
as the constitution of this Synod. Rev. D. J. Koontz was elected presi- 
dent, W. P. Phifer, recording and corresponding secretary, and Rev. 
S. Holt, treasurer." 

Upon the adoption of this report, the members of the new Synod 
offered the following, which was unanimously adopted: 

"Resolved, That we, the members of the Alpha Synod, hereby 
tender our most hearty and sincere thanks to the officers and members 
of the honorable Synod of North Carolina for the kind interest they 
have manifested to us, the first Colored Lutherans of North Carolina, 
and we pray that they may ever cherish toward us the same kindly 
feelings, and help us in oui work. God bler.t- you!" 

Later the Colored Lutheran pastors and churches voluntarily united 
with the Missouri Synod, which had launched upon an extensive mis- 
sionary program among the Negroes of the South. While the North 
Carolina Synod had always shown a sympathetic interest toward work 
among the Negroes and, beginning in 1880, had given some financial 
support, the results were r ever too encouraging. 

Local conditions and territorial expansion had made the forma- 
tion of new Synods inevitable and desirable. At the same time, there 
existed a feeling that, in broader spheres of activity, some sort of 
cooperation between Synods was necessary. This became increasingly 
apparent as the church expanded its program. Practical minded men 
in the North Carolina Synod felt this need even before 1820, and were 
perhaps inclined to surrender some things that were even more im- 
portant in order to make such cooperation possible. Their willingness 
to compromise and their impatient determination to bring about a 
union with other Synods were unfortunate, but their motives were 
honorable and the ends which they sought seemed desirable. At any 
rr.te, the relation of the Synod to other Synods and its connection with 
General Lutheran Bodies became an important factor in its development. 

To the Ministerium of Pennsylvania belongs the honor of having 
inaugurated this movement. As early as 1807, a letter was addressed 
by that body to the North Carolina Synod: but this letter was not 
acknowledged for reasons explained in the following action taken in 1812: 

"A fervent wish being expressed to enter into nearer and more 
cordial connection wth the brethren professing our faith in Pennsylvania, 
a letter of the year 1807, addressed to our ministry, from the ministry 
of Pennsylvania, then in Synod assembled, was read. We felt sorrow 
that because in said and the succeeding year no full Synod had here 
assembled, and the same had been mislaid, and the receipt never 
acknowledged and the same never answered. 



58 History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 

"Revs. Storch and Shober were hereupon appointed in the name 
of this ministry to answer the said letter." 

The next step was taken in 1818 when a call was issued by 
the Ministerium of Pennsylvania asking that representatives from various 
Synods assemble in Baltimore, Maryland, at the time of the regular 
annual meeting of the ministerium during Trinity week, 1819, to con- 
sider a plan to be proposed for the closer union of all the Lutheran 
Synods in America. Unfortunate developments which attended the 
action of the Synod with respect to this call have already been pre- 
sented in another connection, and mention has been made of the fact 
that the Synod, in 1820, voted, by more than a two-thirds majority, to 
become a part of the organization which became known as the General 
Synod. It remained a member of this body and continued to take 
an active and influential part in its deliberations and work until after 
the beginning of the War Between the States. 

With the outbreak of war, the physical impossibility of continuing 
a relationship that had so long proven beneficial and pleasant became 
apparent; and, at its convention held in Wilmington, May 2, 1861, the 
North Carolina Synod took measures to meet the situation. A special 
committee on "Church Relations", consisting of the Revs. D. H. Bittle, 
Joseph A. Linn and S. Rothrock, was appointed. This committee pre- 
sented the following preamble and resolutions which were unanimously 
adopted: 

"Whereas, In the distracted condition of our once happy country, 
we deem it impracticable to send our delegates to the next meeting of 
the General Synod, about to convene at Lancaster, Pennsylvania; and, 
feeling that other Synods South are in a similar situation with this 
body, therefore, 

"Resolved, That we recommend a convention of all Southern 
delegates to the General Synod to meet at Salisbury, N. C, on Thursday 
preceding the third Sabbath in May, 1862, for the purpose of endorsing 
the proceedings of the next meeting of the General Synod, if prac- 
ticable; otherwise to take such steps as may best promote the future 
harmony and prosperity of the portion of the church represented by 
the absent delegates. 

"Resolved, That we hereby commission our present delegates to the 
General Synod to attend the said convention. 

"Resolved, That the Corresponding Secretary of this body be 
instructed to inform all our Synods in the South of this action and ask 
their cooperation." 

The Synod held its 1862 meeting before the time set for the 
proposed convention of delegates had arrived. In the meantime, con- 
ditions had continued to grow worse, and it now seemed altogether 
unlikely that any further relations with the Northern body could be 
maintained. The Synod, therefore, took action dissolving its connec- 



History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 59 

tion with the "Northern General Synod" and declared itself in favor of 
forming a General Synod of the Confederate States, on the basis of the 
Augsburg Confession. Delegates who were elected to the Salisbury con- 
vention were empowered to vote for such an organization; and in the 
event of the formation of a Southern General Synod, were authorized 
to represent the Synod in it. 

The meeting was held at the appointed time and the Southern 
General Synod was organized. The new organization proved, in many 
respects, to be a disappointment to those who had suggested it. Not 
all of the Southern Synods cooperated, and its spirit and outlook were 
provincial rather than general. The North Carolina Synod, however, 
continued to be a part of the body until 1870. The delegation which 
had attended the meeting held in Winchester, Virginia, June 9th of that 
year submitted a very discouraging report which closed with the ques- 
tion, "Will it not be well to enquire, at this time, what advantage 
to the church will it be to continue in connection with a body which has, 
m all probability, served its day?" The report was unanimously adopted, 
and the Synod at once severed its relations with the Southern General 
Synod. 

For the first time in fifty years, the Synod now stood independent 
of all general bodies and was free to devote the greater part of its 
energies to the development of its internal interests. This was, how- 
ever, so foreign to its spirit and principles that such a condition could 
not long continue; and in 1881 the Synod again became a member 
of the Southern General Synod. 

This Synod, however, was general in name only. The Tennessee 
Synod, which represented no inconsiderable part of the strength of 
the Lutheran church in the South, had never become a member; and 
in 1872, the Holston Synod withdrew, and in 1874, united with the Gen- 
eral Council. The desire for a more truly representative body led to 
the proposition that a Church Diet be held at some suitable time and 
place for the purpose of inaugurating a more general organic union 
properly based on the confessions of the church, invested with proper 
powers, among the Lutheran Synods in the South. The proposition 
met with such an encouraging response that the two Lutheran journals 
in the South, Our Church Paper and the Lutheran Visitor, were asked 
to set the time and place and to issue the call. This was done, and 
the Diet was held in Salisbury, North Carolina, November 12-13, 1884. 
Representatives from all Southern Synods were present; and a Doctrinal 
Basis, soundly Scriptural and truly Lutheran, was unanimously adopted. 
A proposed constitution for the new organization was also drafted and 
approved. The Diet met again in Roanoke, Virginia, June 23-28, 1886, 
at the time of the meeting of the General Synod; and the two bodies 
were merged into one under the name of "The United Synod of the 
Evangelical Lutheran Church in the South." 

Thus, for the first time, all Synods in the South were united 
in one General Body. This organization did much to draw the Lutherans 



60 History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 

cf this part of America together and to promote the general interests 
of the church. A Board of Home and Foreign Missions was created, 
The Lutheran Theological Southern Seminary was strengthened, a pub- 
lication house was established and church periodicals were merged, and 
other causes were advanced. The United Synod did not accomplish 
all of this at once, but it continued to function effectively until, in 
1918, it joined with the General Synod and the General Council in the 
formation of the United Lutheran Church in America. In all of this, 
the North Carolina Synod was an active participant and a loyal sup- 
porter. 

The missionary activities of the Synod would make a story in 
themselves. The first Lutheran ministers in North Carolina were more 
than pastors of local congregations; they were traveling missionaries 
who set an example and established a precedent for those who should 
follow. The founders of the Synod were filled with the missionary 
spirit. Available records of the missionary activities of Nussmann, 
Arends, Storch, Paul Henkel, and R. J. Miller would fill a large volume, 
but much that they did was never recorded and other records have been 
lost. These men evidently imparted some of this same spirit to the 
people whom they served. While established congregations may have 
little direct financial support, they made the work possible through their 
willingness to share with others the time and energies of their pastors. 
It was only natural, therefore, that the newly organized Synod should 
take steps to continue and enlarge this work under its official super- 
vision and by its support. The first traveling missionary appointed by 
the Synod was the Rev. R. J. Miller, whose home was in Burke county. 
On the eighteenth day of June, 1811, he started, by private conveyance, 
on his first missionary tour. His route carried him through Wilkes, 
Surry, and Stokes counties in North Carolina; Pendleton, Bath, Green- 
briar, Monroe, Montgomery, Wythe, and Washington counties in Vir- 
ginia; Sullivan, Carter, Washington and Greene counties in Tennessee; 
thence through the mountains of western North Carolina to his home, 
where he arrived about the middle of October. A little later in the 
same year he made a trip into South Carolina. Philip Henkel, Jacob 
Scherer, and L. Markert were other appointed missionaries who traveled 
as far west as Ohio and Indiana. 

These missionary activities were suspended or at least curtailed 
during the years immediately preceding and following 1820; but in 
1824, the Rev. Jacob Scherer reported that, according to previous instruc- 
tions, he had visited Bedford county, Tennessee, had traveled 2,200 miles, 
preached thirty-eight times, and had received offerings amounting to 
$45.60. He reported expenses totaling $20.69. The same year. The Rev. 
William Jenkens reported that he had visited Lutheran congregations 
near Duck River, Tennessee; that he had preached in two organized 
congregations and had organized two additional churches in Franklin 
and Lincoln counties. He concludes his report, "Since the last Synod 
I rode 2,000 miles, preached 175 times, baptized 84 children, 7 adults, 
and 7 Negroes, received 34 into the church, and buried eight persons." 



History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 61 

Even at this early date the migration of Lutherans to "The West", 
which was to affect many North Carolina congregations so seriously, 
had begun. Lutherans in Illinois had appealed to the Synod for help 
in 1819, but conditions within the Synod itself were so disturbed that no 
aid could be given. Their destitute condition was again presented to 
the Synod in 1825, and The Rev. William Jenkins was authorized to visit 
there and give them such assistance as he could. The Rev. John C. A. 
Schoenberg, who had been sent out in 1827, returned in 1828 to be 
ordained and reported to the Synod that, there were hundreds of 
Lutherans scattered through Illinois, Indiana, and Missouri, entirely 
destitute of preaching by our ministers. 

In 1832, the Rev. Daniel Scherer, who had been pastor of St. 
John's church, Cabarrus county, felt it his duty to labor as a missionary 
in the State of Illinois. He located in Hillsboro and soon had a con- 
gregaton organized and in a flourishing condition. In 1834, Synod 
adopted the following: 

"Resolved, That we express our approbation of the laudable efforts 
of the Rev. Daniel Scherer in collecting and organizing a Lutheran 
congregation in Hillsboro, Illinois. 

"Resolved, That we receive the same into full connection with 
this Synod." In 1836, Pastor Scherer was dismissed from the North 
Carolina Synod to unite himself with the "Synod of the West", and his 
congregation naturally went with him. 

Missionary operations were carried on in parts of Virginia until 
the organization of the South West Virginia Synod, in 1842; but from 
then on, such activities were confined to the State of North Carolina, 
presumably because other Synods had been organized and were more 
favorably located for the continuance of such work. A practice estab- 
lished quite early in the life of the Synod resulted in the organization 
of many new congregations. According to this practice, pastors were 
expected to use the extra Sunday in months having five Sundays for 
holding services in communities in which there was no organized con- 
gregation. With the exception of the years between 1820 and 1830, 
each decade witnessed the organization of new churches; but, with a 
few exceptions, those organized prior to 1900 were in rural areas adjacent 
to well established congregations. The number organized during each 
decade is as follows: 1831-1840, five; 1841-1850, three; 1851-1860, five; 
1861-1870, five; 1871-1880, seven; 1881-1890, three; 1891-1900, eleven. At 
the beginning of the period, St. John's, Salisbury was the only congrega- 
tion located in a town of any size. St. James', Concord, was organized in 
1842; St. Paul's, Wilmington, in 1858; St. Mark's, Charlotte, in 1859; First 
church, Albemarle, in 1880; Augsburg, Winston-Salem, in 1891; but it 
was not until the beginning of the present century that the Synod became 
actively interested in establishing congregations in the centers of 
population. 

At its Centennial convention in 1903, the Synod referred the mat- 
ter of employing a Synodical Field Missionary to the Executive Com- 



62 History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 

mittee. This committee reported to the next convention that, for lack 
of funds it had been unable to carry out Synod's wish, and that for 
the same reason it had been kept from undertaking work at Lexington. 
The Committee on the Executive's Committee's Report recommended 
the adoption of these items but offered a further recommendation to 
the effect that, "The Executive Committee for the ensuing year take steps 
to place a synodical missionary in the field at an early date." This 
was adopted, but no provision was made for financing the undertaking. 
At a later session, a motion was made to reconsider; and in the dis- 
cussion that ensued, a proposition was made by delegate J. H. Rehder 
of St. Paul's church, Wilmington, to raise $1,000.00 for the salary of 
such a missionary. The matter took definite shape in a motion to 
have the roll of pastorates called for pledges to this object. This was 
done and the amount pledged was $720.00. A committee consisting of 
Messrs. J. A. Cline, W. F. Aberly, W. F. Snider, J. A. Davidson, E. E. 
Workman, and J. H. Rehder was appointed to solicit additional pledges 
to the fund. This action was significant because it marked the be- 
ginning of a new era in Home Mission work and because it was initiated 
by the laymen of the church. Pastor Edward Fulenwider was later 
called as missionary, and after a survey of the field had been made, 
was instructed to concentrate his efforts at Lexington but to give 
such attention as possible to other points. A congregation was organ- 
ized at Lexington in 190.5, and in February, 1907, Missionary Fulenwider 
resigned in order to accept a call to become its regular pastor. The 
Rev. Jacob L. Morgan, having accepted the call to become Synodical 
Missionary, entered upon his work July 1, 1907, and continued to serve 
in that capacity until he was elected the Synod's first full time presi- 
dent in 1919. 

Missionary Morgan possessed a deep interest in the cause, un- 
bounded energy, and a rare organizing ability. As a direct result of 
his labors, churches were organized at High Point, Greensboro, Moores- 
vills, Landis, Raleigh, and Liberty. He also had supervision of other 
mission congregations of the Synod. In addition to the work of organ- 
izing and building new congregations, he raised most of the money to 
provide them with church buildings. 

Under this new program of Home Mission work, the church be- 
came firmly established in the growing centers of population, large 
numbers were saved to the Lutheran church who would otherwise have 
been lost to other denominations, and larger numbers of unchurched 
people were reached. Due credit should be given to the members of 
the Women's Missionary Society and to the active laymen of the 
church for their loyal support of the entire program. 

The Synod's activities in Foreign Mission work were limited to 
its participation in the programs carried on by the General Bodies 
to which it belonged, and to the activities of the Women's Missionary 
Society. No column for Foreign Missions was carried in the financial 
tables until 1883. From that time on, the cause received increasing 
emphasis. Prior to the opening of the Field in Japan by the United 



History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 63 

Synod, contributions had been made to the General Synod's work in 
India and Africa. The following native sons and daughters of the 
Synod had entered service in the Foreign Field up to 1920: The Revs. 
Clarence E. Norman and John K. Linn and Misses Maud and Annie 
Powlas. The Synod also had a special interest in the Revs. C. K. 
Lippard, D.D., and A. J. Stirewalt, D.D., who were from the Tennessee 
Synod, and in the Rev. C. L. Brown, D.D., who was a North Carolinian 
by birth. 

The period under review was also marked by a progressive devel- 
opment in the Confessional position of the Synod, and in its Lutheran 
practices. This development may be indicated briefly by a presentation 
of the successive changes that were made in its constitution, without 
specific reference to the situations out of which they grew. 

The revised constitution which was adopted in 1817 and continued 
to remain in force for many years, contained the following: 

"Article I. The first twenty- one articles of the confession deliv- 
ered to the assembled Diet at Augsburg, in Germany, by the Lutheran 
divines, known by the name of the Augsburg Confession, as extracted 
fiom the Bible, is the point of union of our church. Every minister, 
before ordination, pledges himself to the same. 

"Article XI. It is the duty of every preacher to instruct all chil- 
dren of our members from twelve years old and upwards, in the Catechism, 
and to confirm them, or have them conflmed, in their baptismal vow, by 
authorized ministers, and admit them to the sacrament, when they are 
sufficiently enlightened. The Small Catechism of Dr. Luther, in the 
German language, and the Christian Catechism, in the English language, 
are to be used for such instruction, and the doctrine is to be explained 
foi six weeks prior to the confirmation, if possible." 

In 1846, Synod adopted the following questions to be propounded 
to all candidates for ordination: 

"1. Do you believe the Scriptures of the Old and New Testaments 
to contain the Word of God, and that it is the only infallible rule of 
faith and practice? 

"2. Do you believe that the fundamental doctrines of the Word 
of God are taught in a manner substantially correct in the doctrinal 
articles of the Augsburg Confession?" 

The constitution adopted in 1869 contains the following Doctrinal 
Basis: 

"1. We believe that the Cannonical Books of the Old and New 
Testament Scriptures are given by inspiration of God and are the perfect 
and only rule of faith and practice. 

"2. We believe that the three general creeds, the Apostles, Nicene, 
and Athanasian, exibit the faith of the church universal, in accordance 
with this rule. 



64 History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 

"3. We believe that the unaltered Augsburg Confession is, in 
all its parts, in harmony with the Word of God, and is a correct 
exhibition of doctrine. 

"4. We believe that the Apology, the Catechisms of Luther, the 
Smalcald Articles, and the formula of Concoid, are a faithful develop- 
ment and defence of the doctrine of the Word of God, as set forth in 
the Augsburg Confession." 

This basis was revised in 1889 to read: 

"The Evangelical Lutheran Synod of North Carolina confesses that 
the Cannonical Books of the Old and New Testaments are the Word of 
God, given by inspiration of the Holy Ghost, and are the clear, only, 
and sufficient rule of faith; that the three general creeds. Apostles', 
Nicene, and Athanasian, exhibit the faith of the church universal, in 
accordance with this rule; that the unaltered Augsburg Confession is, 
in all its parts, in harmony with this rule of faith, and is a correct 
exhibition of its doctrine; and that the Apology, the Large and Small 
Catechisms of Luther, the Smalcald Articles and the Formula of Con- 
cord are a faithful development and defense of the doctrines of God's 
Word and of the Augsburg Confession. All her questions concerning the 
faith of the church, its ministers or congregations, and the administra- 
tion of the Word and sacraments, shall be judged and decided according 
to this rule and these Confessions." 

A growing appreciation of distinctive Lutheran doctrines and of 
the Confessions as a doctrinal basis resulted in a similar development 
in Lutheran practices. Since, in the Lutheran church, unity has always 
been dependent upon agreement on doctrinal questions rather than on 
uniformity in such practices as organization, worship, and other means 
used for carrying out its divinely appointed mission; and since a great 
deal of latitude has always been permitted in the latter field, the term 
''Lutheran Practice" cannot be defined with any degree of exactness. 
However, principles inherent in the Confessions of the church have 
always exerted an influence upon its practices; and growth in an appre- 
ciation of the one will result in development in the other. The same 
conditions that caused the early Lutheran Church in America to neglect 
a clear-cut statement of its Confessional position also led it to follow 
practices not altogether in harmony with the spirit and principles of 
those Confessions. 

The first constitution, adopted in 1803, not only did not contain a 
basic confessional statement; it failed to cover many practical situa- 
tions with which the new organization would inevitably be confronted. 
This should not be interpreted as a criticism of the document or of the 
men who drafted it but as evidence that a long process of development 
lay ahead, a process which resulted in frequent changes in the consti- 
tution. It was amended at the second anni'.al convention and again 
in 1817. In 1832, a second and very lengthy constitution was adopted; 
in 1840 a third; in 1846, a fourth; in 1855, a fifth; in 1870, a sixth; and 



History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 65 

from that time en it was frequently amended. In 1869, the "License 
System" was abolished, "on the ground that no authority for it had 
been found in the Word of God, nor any warrant for the same in our 
I utheran articles of faith and practice; but that it had only been 
introduced into this country as a provisional custom for the speedy 
supply of ministers." 

The liturgical usages of the church were also influenced by prac- 
tical conditions and underwent many changes. The material for formal 
V, orship was at first limited and hard to obtain; but in spite of prac- 
tical difficulties, a definite liturgical consciousness prevailed. St. John's 
church, in Cabarrus county, as early as 1782, adopted the Order of Ser- 
vices used in the German Lutheran Court Chapel of St. James', in Lon- 
don, England.* In 1813, Synod considered the matter a common "Agenda" 
(Liturgy or Mode of Service) and resolved, "That we first write our 
brethren in Pennsylvania, to ascertain what they think and say con- 
cerning such a book which could be used in all the States." At its next 
convention, Synod was informed that the Pennsylvania Synod, "Had 
resolved to prepare and complete an 'Agenda' (liturgy) by its next 
meeting." Synod, therefore, decided to await the result of their labors, 
in the hope that they give the church a spiritual and consecrated 
book. In 1817, Synod adopted the following, "The hymn book (Gemein- 
schaftliche Gesangbuch) printed or issued by Shaefer and Mann, was 
recommended for introduction and use in our churches, and so also 
the English liturgy of New Work, and the English hymn book by Paul 
Henkel, were recommended " 

In the years that followed, the difficulty experienced in obtaining 
suitable books, together with the influence of surrounding groups 
who were outspoken in their objections to all liturgical worship, resulted 
in the almost complete abandonment of the Church's rich liturgical 
heritage, and it was not until many years later that a new interest 
was awakened. The publication of a new Book of Worship did much 
to renew this interest, and the report of the president, in 1868, contains 
the following: "It is with devout gratitude to God we announce the 
favorable reception of the General Synod's new Book of Worship within 
our bounds. A number of our ministers are conducting worship accord- 
ing to its prescribed forms, to the entire satisfaction of their congrega- 
tion, and we are very hopeful that in a little while the book will be 
in general use. It is proper that some recommendatory notice be made 
of this book at our present meeting." Such action was taken by the 
adoption of the following: "Resolved, That we have heard with pleasure 
and unfeigned gratitude the favorable reception of our 'Book of 
Worship', and urge that each individual member of our church procure 
a copy as soon as practicable." 

The next step in this development was taken when, in 1878, the 
General Synod South proposed to the General Synod and the General 
Council that they unite in the preparation of a Common Service Book 

* Bernheim History p. 453. 



66 History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 

for all English speaking Lutherans. The proposal was accepted, and 
the work was completed in 1888. In 1893, this service, together with 
other liturgical material and a selection of hymns, was published as, 
"The Book of Worship for the use of the United Synod of the Evangelical 
Lutheran Church in the South". It immediately received wide accept- 
ance in the North Carolina Synod. A second Book of Worship contain- 
i)ig a materially revised hymnal was published in 1912. This was fol- 
lowed, in 1919, by the Common Service Book which is still in use. 

Available statistical records are so incomplete and follow such 
varying patterns that it is almost impossible to determine, with any 
degree of accuracy, the numerical growth of the Synod or its develop- 
ment in benevolent giving; but the figures given below will indicate 
the trend. The quarter-century years which are used may not always 
be typical, but when combined, they should represent a reasonable 
average. The starting year, 1825, marks the lowest point; for the min- 
isters and congregations in South Carolina had just been transferred 
to the new Synod in that State, and the full effects of the losses to the 
Tennessee Synod were apparent by that time. Figures in the last two 
columns, prior to 1900, are undoubtedly incomplete; and their chief 
value, as stated above, is to indicate the trend. 

Number of Number of Members Total 

Year Ministers CJongregations Communing Benevolences 

1825 10 37 1,335 $ 25.94 

1850 12 26 2,482 189.19 

1875 22 37 4,131 348.24 

1900 34 62 8,161 2,658.46 

1920 55 77 12,035 65,987.00* 

During this period, developments in the field of education kept 
fully abreast of the advances in other areas of the Synod's life and 
activity, and added immeasurably to its effectiveness. Auxiliary or- 
ganizations, which functioned in the congregations and in the general 
activities of the church, also did much to awaken interest, promote 
causes, and provide channels through which the talents of a conse- 
crated laity might be more fully utilized. But these are stories in 
themselves and will be adequately presented in other sections of this 
history. 

During this same period, the names of not fewer than 200 ministers 
appeared on the roll of the Synod. The contribution which they made 
toward its development can scarcely be overemphasized. Some served 
in the Synod for many years, others for only a brief period; some ren- 
dered outstanding service in an official capacity or as leaders in its 
deliberations, others served humbly as pastors and exerted little influ- 
ence beyond the bounds of the parishes in which they labored; but 

* Benevolence, Apportioned and Unapportioned, including $27,470 paid 
to college. $5,927.00 was paid on Apportionment. 



History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 67 

each, in his own way, made a definite contribution toward the exten- 
sion of the Kingdom and the building up of the Body of Christ. It is 
obviously impossible to include a biographical sketch of each of them 
in this narrative, or to give due recognition to the work which they 
did. Their names and their official relationships to the Synod will 
be- found in the tabulated sections of this book, but the full measure 
of their service must remain unknown save to the Master Whom they 
served. The same is true of the thousands of consecrated men and 
women who, through theii loyal support and unselfish service, did 
so much to promote the work of the church in their own congregations 
and in the larger areas of operation undertaken by the Synod. Under 
God, these pastors and people, great and small, made the history of 
this period, only a small part of which can be recorded here. 



68 History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 



History of the Lutheran Church in N, C. 



69 



CHAPTER VI 

The Tennessee Synod 

1820 - 1920 

Events and circumstances which led to the organization of the 
Tennessee Synod were presented in a preceding chapter and need not 
be repeated. Differences which had been developing within the North 
Carolina Synod came to a head at the Seventeenth Convention held in 
Lincolnton, beginning on May 28, 1820^ and resulted in the formation 
of a new Synod which, under the name of the Evangelical Lutheran 
Tennessee Synod, continued to operate for a full century, to maintain its 
own identity, to make a very definite contribution to the development of 
the Lutheran Church in North Carolina and other states, and to exert 
a positive influence upon American Lutheranism._ As was the case in 
the North Carolina Synod, its development followed a distinct line 
until the bodies were again merged into one. The experiences and 
problems of the two Synods were, in many respects, much alike; and 
a certain degree of sameness in their presentation is unavoidable. How- 
ever, each carried on its own work in its own way and made its own 
history, and each merits separate consideration. 

As has already been stated, the two parties were unable to 
reconcile their differences at the meeting in Lincolnton. The one party 




Present Building 

Solomon's Church, Cove Creek 

Greene County, Tennessee 



70 History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 

withdrew to a nearby hotel and continued with the business of Synod. 
The other, after some consultation and deliberation, adjourned. On 
July 17, 1820, a meeting was held in Solomon's Churchy Cove Creek, 
Greene County, Tennessee, "To organize a Conference or Synod, in ac- 
cordance with the teachings, doctrines, and policy of the Word of God, 
as set forth in the Confessions of the Evangelical Lutheran Church."* 

The following ministers were present at this meeting: Jacob Zink 
of Washington County, Virginia; Paul Henkel of New Market, Shenan- 
doah County, Va.; Adam Miller of Sullivan County, Tenn., and Philip 
Henkel and George Easterly of Greene County, Tenn. David Henkel 
of Lincoln County, N. C, who could not be present in person, acquiesced 
in the object of the meeting and was recognized as a member. The 
lay delegates representing congregations were: From Emmanuel Churchy 
Washington County, Tenn., John and Conrad Keicher; from Union Church 
in the same county and state, Michael Kapp; from Jacob's (St. James') 
Church, Greene County, Tenn., John Nehs (Neas), John Ottinger, Philip 
Easterly and John Renner; from Solomon's Church, same county and 
state, Frederick Gottschall, John Koch, Philip Ebert and John Froschaur; 
from Sinking Spring Church in the same county and state, John feauer, 
Frederick Schaeffer, Peter Gobel and John Hermann; from three churches 
in Sullivan County^ Tenn., Henry Herchelroth and Jacob Deck; from 
Golden Spring Church, Greene County, Tenn., Nicholas Fley and George 
Boessinger.* 

The meeting was opened in a regular, churchly manner with 
singing and praying; a basis and regulations were adopted; and an 
organization was effected, under the name and title of the Evangelical 
German Lutheran Tennessee Conference or Synod. This "Basis and 
Regulations" contained fourteen sections which may be summarized as 
follows: 

1. German shall be the language used both in the proceedings of 
the Synod and in its written records. 

2. All teachings relative to faith. Christian conduct, and all books 
publicly used in the church in the service or worship of God, shall be in 
harmony with the doctrines of the Holy Scriptures and the Augsburg 
Confession. 

3. Whoever desires to be a teacher or otherwise an officer in the 
church shall obligate himself to teach according to the Word of God, 
the Augsburg Confession, and the doctrines of our church; and shall 
not be allowed to stand in connection with the so-called Central or 
General Synod. 

4. Members of our churches shall be those who have been baptized 
according to the command of Christ, confirmed by the imposition of 
hands, and participate in the celebration of the Holy Supper. 

5. Not more than two ranks or grades in the office of teaching, or 
the ministry, are necessary for the preservation and perpetuation of the 

* Tennessee Synod History, p. 24. 

♦ History Tennessee Synod, pp. 24-25. 



History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 71 

church, namely: Pastors and Deacons. A Pastor is one who has been 
ordained with prayer and the imposition of hands by one or more 
pastors. He is authorized to perform all ministerial acts. 

6. A Deacon is also a servant in the Word of God, but he is 
not fully invested with the ministerial office as is the Pastor. He may 
give instructions in the Catechism, read sermons^ attend to funerals, 
admonish, and in cases of necessity, baptize children. Officers in the 
congregation shall be as they were heretofore customary in our church: 
Elders, Deacons, etc. 

7. At each Conference, pastors shall be named who shall conduct 
ordinations, sign certificates and affix seals, and see that good order is 
maintained. Ministers and lay delegates may appoint one of the pastors 
chairman, and in the same manner one may be appointed secretary; 
but it is not to be understood that these must serve in these positions 
throughout all sessions. 

8. Conference or Synod shall meet annually on the third Sunday 
in October, preferably in Tennessee; but the name Tennessee Conference 
or Synod shall always be retained although it may have ministers and 
lay delegates in other states. 

9. The Conference shall be composed of ministers and lay dele- 
gates, but there shall not be more votes cast by lay delegates than a 
number equal to the number of preachers present. 

10. Each congregation shall have a treasury for such money as 
may be collected to defray the expenses of publishing the minutes, of 
traveling ministers, etc. 

11. Each pastor should keep a record of the number of baptisms, 
confirmations, communicants, and funerals, so that they may appear in 
the proceedings of the Conference each year. 

12. All possible diligence should be used in the instruction of 
children in all our doctrines of faith in the German language. 

13. None of the teachers of our Conference can take a seat and 
vote in the present Synod of North Carolina^ because we cannot regard 
it as a true Lutheran Synod. 

14. Necessary additions to these principles and regulations may 
be made by a majority of the votes, but in such a manner as not to 
come in conflict with the design and intention of the foregoing 
principles.* 

The Revs. Adam Miller and Jacob Zink, who had been licensed 
by the North Carolina Synod, were ordained at this meeting. George 
Easterly was evidently continued as a deacon since he is listed as such 
in the minutes of the next convention. This made a total of six ministers. 
No list of congregations is given. After transacting other necessary busi- 

* Summarized from Tennessee Synod History, pp. 25-29. 



72 History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 

ness, the Conference adjourned to meet in one of Rev. Adam Miller's 
congregations in Sullivan County, Tennessee, beginning on the third 
Sunday in October, 1821. 

Thus the history of the nev^^ Synod began. The name "Tennessee" 
was not intended to indicate boundary, but to distinguish the Conference 
or Synod from other Synods already in existance. This is clearly stated 
in the revised basis adopted in 1827 which states, "This body shall 
continue to bear the title Evangelical Lutheran Tennessee Synod. But 
this title shall not be so construed as to give members who reside in 
Tennessee any prerogatives or advantages over others; for this body 
consists for the most part of members in other states; but simply to dis- 
tinguish it from the North Carolina Synod, which belongs to the General 
Synod." As a matter of fact, its chief strength soon lay in other states, 
principally in Virginia and North and South Carolina. After the organi- 
zation of the Holston Synod in 1860, it no longer had churches in 
Tennessee. 

Since the reasons set forth for organizing the new Synod were 
based chiefly on differences in doctrine, its immediate emphasis on sound 
doctrine was quite natural. Its leaders were men who had a knowledge 
and appreciation of the historic Confessions of the Lutheran Church far 
greater than that possessed by the average minister of the day; and 
they were quick to realize the importance of a positive Lutheran Con- 
fessional Basis and strict adherence to it. The basis and regulations 
adopted at the first Convention provide that, "All teachings relative to 
faith, and all doctrines concerning Christian conduct, as well as all 
books, publicly used in the church in its service or worship of God, shall 
be arranged and kept, as nearly as it is possible to do, in accordance 
with the doctrines of the Holy Scriptures and the Augsburg Confession, 
and especially shall the young and others who need it, be instructed in 
Luther's Small Catechism, according to the custom of the church 
hitherto . . . Whoever desires to be a teacher, shall also take a 
solemn obligation, that he will teach according to the Word of God and 
the Augsburg Confession and the doctrines of our church."* The entire 
twenty-eight articles of the Unaltered Augsburg Confession, in German, 
are also included in the minutes of this first convention. 

The Constitution was revised in 1827, but no material changes 
were made in its Confessional Basis. In the revised Constitution adopted 
in 1866, the Confessional Basis is stated as follows: "The Holy Scriptures^ 
the inspired writings of the Old and New Testaments, shall be the only 
rule and standard of doctrine and church discipline. As a true and 
faithful exhibition of the doctrines of the Holy Scriptures, in regard to 
matters of faith and practice, this Synod receives the three Ancient 
Symbols: the Apostolic, Nicene, and Athanasian creeds; the Unaltered 
Augsburg Confession of Faith. It receives also the other Symbolical 
Books of the Evangelical Lutheran Church, viz.: the Apology, the 
Smalcald Articles, the Smaller and Larger Catechisms of Luther, and the 

• Sections 2 and 3. 



History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 73 

Formula of Concord — as true Scriptural developments of the doctrines 
taught in the Augsburg Confession." 

This emphasis upon a sound Confessional Lutheranism was not 
limited to the formal declarations embodied in its Confessional Basis 
and printed in its minutes. From the very beginning, the Synod sought 
to develop and preserve a strong and vital confessional consciousness 
in ministers and laymen alike by concentrating their attention upon the 
great doctrines of the church through discussion at the meetings of 
Synod, thorough instruction of catechumens, and the distribution of 
printed material. Doctrinal sermons and discussions were printed in 
the minutes, and at the eighth convention, provision was made for the 
distribution of publications and good books by appointing special agents 
who were to be aided by the ministers and others. 

The Synod was very fortunate in having at its disposal the fa- 
cilities of the Henkel Press which had been founded in 1806 by members 
of the Henkel family. Among the numerous publications of a doctrinal 
character were: the Unaltered Augsburg Confession in both German and 
English; the Book of Concord, first edition in 1851 and a second and 
revised edition in 1854; Luther's Small and Large Cathechisms, to- 
gether with a Historical Introduction^ to which were added hymns and 
prayers adapted to catechetical instruction, translated from the German, 
1852; Luther on the Sacraments, or the Distinctive Doctrines of the 
Evangelical Lutheran Church respecting Baptism and the Lord's Supper, 
1853; Luther's Church Postil, sermons on the Epistles for the different 
Sundays and Festivals of the Church Year, translated from the German, 
1859; and many briefer treatises. 

The doctrinal stand of the Tennessee Synod, together with the 
wide circulation of the material which issued from the Henkel Press, 
did much to turn the tide toward a conservative Lutheranism through- 
out the Lutheran Church in America, and the church has not hesitated 
to give credit where credit is due. While the zeal of some of its members 
may have led them to extremes, and while a more tolerant attitude 
might have resulted in the attainment of their objective with less friction 
and ill will, particularly among the Lutherans in North Carolina; the 
ultimate result was a united church truly Lutheran in its doctrine and 
practice. 

The basis and regulations adopted at the first session were, in 
effect, the Constitution of the new Conference or Synod, and the prin- 
ciples set forth in them were largely to determine the nature and 
polity of the organization through the years that followed. Some changes 
in form and arrangement were made at the Eighth Session; and it was 
published, along with explanatory remarks by David Henkel, but no 
material changes were made. The Constitution was again revised in 
1866 and in 1889 but again no material changes were made. 

The basis and regulations adopted at the First Session indicate, 
by inference rather than by direct statement, the views which its authors, 
in particular, and the founders, in general, held with regard to the 
nature and functions of a Synodical organization. They recognized the 



74 History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 

need for some general organization, but they also accepted the principle 
of ultimate congregational authority and responsibility so long as these 
were in conformity with the Confessional principles and practices of the 
Church. Further, these men were familiar with the evils of an 
ecclesiastical hierarchy, and they were determined to avoid the concen- 
tration of power in the hands of any individual or group. The mem- 
bership of Synod was to consist of ministers, and lay delegates duly 
elected by their congregations. Such officers as might be needed for 
the orderly conducting of business might be chosen, but their tenure of 
office and their power were to be strictly limited. Beginning with the 
eighth convention, a secretary was elected annually to serve through 
the Synodical Year. A president and secretary were elected at the 
thirteenth convention, but the idea long prevailed that the president 
held office only during the sessions of Synod. The handling of money 
received through collections was reserved to the congregations, and 
the Synod had no treasurer until a much later time. 

The so-called License System is not mentioned directly in the basis 
and regulations, but Sections 5 and 6 do recognize and approve grades 
or ranks in the ministry, namely, Deacons and Pastors. However^ the 
Synod did return to this system in 1862 in order to meet conditions which 
had arisen as a result of the state of war that prevailed. Mr. D. E. Fox 
was licensed to preach after having been examined by the Rev. P. C. 
Henkel. In 1863, Messrs. L. A. Fox and D. E. Fox were authorized, in 
special cases, to exercise the functions of a pastor. The next year 
Licentiate L. A. Fox was ordained to the office of Pastor, and D. S. 
Henkel and D. A. Goodman were licensed to perform the functions of 
the ministry. In 1865, Synod approved a form for the public licensing 
of young men for the ministry which had been prepared by the Revs. 
A. J. Fox, P. C. Henkel and Timothy Moser. This practice was continued 
until 1876, at which time the action of Synod which had approved it 
was rescinded. 

The position of the Synod regarding policy was so clearly stated 
by Dr. Socrates Henkel in his History of the Evangelical Lutheran Ten- 
nessee Synod that it merits presentation in this connection. After call- 
ing attention to the twenty-eighth article of the Augsburg Confession, he 
makes these observations: 

"1. In its policy, it took the position, in the outset, that the rules 
and principles of church government are contained in the Holy Scrip- 
tures, and no Christian organization has the right to make rules or 
regulations which are not strictly in accord with the Bible. It con- 
demned and rejected all human traditions or rules or regulations imposed 
on the church as necessary to Christian fellowship, which are not well 
and clearly founded in the Holy Scriptures. It even denied the right 
of a majority to decide or control matters relative to doctrine and church 
discipline. The only standard by which such things can be decided, is 
the Word of God. The fact that a majority might decide against a 
doctrine clearly taught in Divine Revelation, should be no sufficient 
reason that the minority should reject or denounce such doctrine. 



History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 75 

"2. Its position is that Synods are only advisory bodies, and that 
they have no right to receive appeals from the decisions of congregations, 
or make rules or regulations which are absolutely binding on congre- 
gations. Of course, Synods may recommend certain regulations for 
the conduct of congregations, and advise them to adopt such rules, but 
they have no right to enforce them contrary to the will of the people. 
The chief business of Synods, according to its position, is to impart 
useful advice, to employ the proper means for the promotion and per- 
petuation of the Gospel of Jesus Christ, to detect and expose erroneous 
doctrines and false teachers, and, on application, to examine candi- 
dates for the ministry; and if they sustain a suitable examination, and 
there are applications for their services in a congregation or congrega- 
tions, to ordain them to the office of the ministry, in regular, churchly 
way. Synods are composed of congregations, represented by ministers 
and lay-delegates; and when persons representing these classes are 
present^ the one class shall not transact business without the presence 
and co-operation of the other. The right to examine and ordain candi- 
dates to the ministerial office, does not, however, belong exclusively to 
Synods. Congregations have the right to choose fit persons for the 
ministry, and individual pastors have the right to ordain them to 
such office. 

"3. It was opposed to the incorporation of Synods by civil gov- 
ernments, or of their holding, as incorporated bodies, any institutions. 
For this would be blending of civil and ecclesiastical authority. It would 
give Synods power to sue and be sued, and to levy taxes on their mem- 
bers, and to compel them to pay them, just the same as any civil in- 
corporation. It is amply sufficient for the best interests of the church, 
for civil government to protect the property of the church by its acts 
of legislation and incorporation of certain individuals as trustees, to hold 
its institutions, against damage and infringement, for the purposes for 
which they were intended. The incorporation of a Synod, holding with- 
in its own corporate limits certain property, is one thing, and lending 
its influence and patronage in favor of colleges^ or other instiutions so 
incorporated and held by trustees, for certain purposes, without any legal 
claim on Synods as incorporated bodies, is something very different, and 
can lead to no conflict between the Church and the State. 

"4. For the purpose of raising funds for the promotion of the 
Gospel and the extension of the Kingdom of Christ, the Synod suggests 
the propriety of each congregation having a treasury for itself, in which 
to deposit all the money that each member or other person might freely 
give. The monies thus contributed were used to defray the cost of print- 
ing the minutes of Synod, to aid traveling ministers, and for other 
purposes which would best enhance the interests of the churches or con- 
gregations. The manner in which these treasuries were to be kept, and 
the disbursements made, was left to the good judgment of the church 
councils and the ministers acquiescing. The monies were to be gathered 
at every meeting, each month or every three months. At every meeting 
of Synod the council of each church was expected to make a report of 
the amounts thus collected. The contributions were generally quite 



76 History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 

liberal, judging from the amount of printing that was done and the 
extensive traveling expenses, and other matters, that were defrayed 
from such collections. It is true, there may not have been as much 
boasting about liberality during the former period of the Synod, as there 
is at the present age^ but the probability is, that there were more real 
charity and free giving."* 

Upon a positive doctrinal basis and within the framework of this 
policy, the Synod carried on its work. A trained ministry was provided, 
the missionary enterprise was fostered and, in due time, cooperation 
with other Synods was established. Some of its activities and a few 
of its problems will be presented in the remaining part of this chapter. 
Other information is contained in the general sections on Educational 
Developments, Auxiliaries, Sketches of Congregations and Tabulations. 

The new Synod entered upon its work with certain distinct ad- 
vantages. First of all, it stood on the firm ground of a strictly Con- 
fessional Lutheranism. This gave it a strength and a unity that was 
sadly lacking in much of the American Lutheran Church of that day. 
In the second place, it possessed a vitality and an enthusiasm peculiar 
to youth and to young organizations. Its leaders were fired with a sense 
of mission. They considered themselves both defenders and propagators of 
the faith, and they approached their task with the zeal of crusaders. 
And finally, it recognized no geographical or territorial boundaries. With- 
in a few years, it had established itself in Virginia, Tennessee, and 
North and South Carolina, and was maintaining outposts in other states 
as far west as Missouri. 

With its doctrinal basis established and its policy determined, the 
new Synod applied itself to its challenging task. The second conven- 
tion was held in Zion Church, Sullivan County^ Tennessee. Those present 
included Revs. Paul Henkel, Adam Miller, Philip Henkel, David Henkel, 
and Deacon George Easterly; and fifteen lay delegates, including John 
Smith, Daniel Lutz and Peter Boger from North Carolina, and Ambrose 
Henkel from Virginia. Joseph Harr was present as an applicant for the 
ministry. Letters were presented from the Revs. Jacob Larros of Ohio, 
Antonius Weyer, a member of the Lutheran Synod of Ohio and adjacent 
states, Henry A. Kurtz of Kentucky, and Daniel Moser and Jacob Grieson 
of North Carolina in which they expressed themselves to be in sympathy 
with the doctrinal position of the new Synod. Petitions were also re- 
ceived from seven congregations in North Carolina and Tennessee, asking 
for ministerial services. A letter from Messrs. John Beck, Charles Greim, 
Henry Conrad, George Greim, Daniel Conrad^ Philip Hedrich and Jacob 
Conrad, Elders and members of several Lutheran congregations in Rowan 
(Davidson) County, North Carolina, declared their steadfastness in the 
Evangelical doctrine, and petitioned for a minister to serve them, since 
they were not satisfied with the one they had. The Rev. Gottlieb Shober 
was supplying these congregations at that time. 

These letters and petitions were typical of many that continued 
to claim the attention of the Synod for many years. It was ill pre- 

• History Tennessee Synod, pp. 262-264. 



History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 77 

pared to meet their challenge, for it had no field missionary, and no 
treasury from which necessary funds might be drawn. Consequently, it 
had to call upon its already overworked pastors to minister to the needs 
of these scattered groups, to organize new congregations, and to open 
new fields. A letter from the Rev. Jacob Zink, received at the third 
convention, stated that he had baptized twenty-eight adults and sixty- 
nine infants in the State of Louisiana and many more than that number 
in the State of Indiana; and there is evidence that others rendered an 
equally effective service. At the ninth convention, twenty-six petitions 
were received from congregations located in the following states: Virginia, 
North Carolina, Tennessee^ Georgia, Indiana, and Ohio; and arrange- 
ments were made to supply the petitioners with at least some services. 
It is impossible to determine the permanent results of these far-flung 
activities, but they represent a valiant effort to preserve to the Lutheran 
Church its scattered adherents, and to reach others who were without 
the means of Grace. 

Some idea of the Synod's activities and growth during the early- 
decades of its life may be obtained from the minutes of the period. 
Parochial reports covered only a few items and were often incomplete, 
inaccurate, and confusing; and the minutes, while they do give an over 
all picture of what was undertaken and accomplished, often fail to 
give information that would be extremely interesting and valuable 
today. A few facts and figures drawn from the decade summaries given 
in the History of the Tennessee Synod, by Dr. S. Henkel, will serve to 
make this picture stand out. 

During the first decade, the number of ministers was increased 
from six to seventeen. Two ministers, Paul Henkel and Jacob Zink, 
passed to their eternal reward, and one was dropped from the roll. No 
list of congregations is given, but Dr. Henkel estimates the number at 
approximately thirty. A total of 6,175 baptisms was reported which in- 
cluded 5,517 infants, 443 adults, and 205 slaves. The number of con- 
firmations reported was 1,902. Not more than two-thirds of the ministers 
gave reports. 

The summary for the second decade indicates that there were 
twelve applicants for the ministry and seventeen ordinations, including 
those to the office of Deacon. Four ministers, the Revs. David and 
Philip Henkel, John N. Stirewalt, and Daniel Moser, were removed by 
death. Accessions by baptism include 6,690 infants, 408 adults, and 250 
slaves. 

During the first twenty years of its life, the Synod lost six ministers 
by death, three of them before they had reached the age of fifty 
years. Four had participated in the organization of the Synod. Limited 
space makes it impossible to give even brief biographical sketches of the 
many men who, through the years, served faithfully as pastors in the 
Synod, but special recognition should be given to these pioneers whose 
lives were so definitely woven into that of the new organization. 

The Rev. Jacob Zink was licensed by the North Carolina Synod at 
Organ Church, October 18^ 1815, and was ordained by the Tennessee 



78 History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 

Synod at its first meeting in 1820. Little is know of him or of his 
work other than that he served churches in Virginia and East Tennessee, 
and that he made at least one extensive missionary tour. He died in 
1829, but the exact time and place are not known. 

The Rev. Paul Henkel died at New Market, Shenandoah County, 
Virginia, November 17, 1825, at the age of seventy-one years. Reference 
has been made elsewhere to his extensive ministerial activities and to 
his outstanding service. Five of his six sons became Lutheran ministers 
and carried on the tradition established by their distinguished father. 
The oldest son was a practicing physician. 

Philip Henkel, a son of Paul Henkel and Elizabeth Negley, was 
born in Pendleton County, Virginia, September 23, 1779, and died in 
Randolph County, North Carolina, October 9, 1833 while on a visit to 
old friends and parishioners. He was licensed by the Ministerium of 
Pennsylvania in 1800, and ordained by the North Carolina Synod in 1805. 
The thirty-three years of his fruitful ministry were spent almost entirely 
in serving churches in North Carolina and East Tennessee. He was 
present at the adjourned meeting of the North Carolina Synod at Lincoln- 
ton in 1803, and was one of the organizers of the Tennessee Synod. 

David Henkel, another son of Paul Henkel, was born at Staunton, 
Virginia, May 4, 1795, and died in Lincoln County, North Carolina, June 
15, 1831. He was licensed by the North Carolina Synod in 1813, at the 
early age of eighteen years, and was ordained on June 6, 1819. He 
possessed a brilliant intellect and unbounded energy, and crowded an 
enormous amount of work into the eighteen years of his active ministry. 
During this time, he preached upwards of 3,200 sermons, baptized 2,997 
infants and 243 adults, and confirmed 1,105 persons. In addition to this, 
he carried on an extensive correspondence and wrote nine distinct 
treatises which were published. 

The Rev. John N. Stirewalt departed this life August 13, 1836, in 
Rowan County, North Carolina, at the age of thirty-four years. He 
entered the ministry in 1827 as a Deacon and was ordained to the office 
of Pastor on August 10, 1829, by the Tennessee Synod. Little is known 
of his active ministry, although his obituary states that he had made 
known the Gospel of the crucified Saviour, with efficiency, to many who 
had been deprived of it, both in his native State and in adjoining States. 

The Rev. Daniel Moser was born in Orange County^ North Carolina, 
May 8, 1790, and was licensed to preach by the North Carolina Synod 
in 1812. He was ordained by the same Synod at its convention in 
Lincolnton in 1820. He was received as a member of the Tennessee 
Synod at its meeting in 1824 and continued to serve as one of its pastors 
until his death on July 11, 1839. 

The Rev. Adam Miller, Sr., whose earthly life came to an end 
during the next decade, was born in York County, Pennsylvania, April 
18, 1760. Later, he moved to Sullivan County, Tennessee, where he 
continued to lead the life of a consecrated layman until he was fifty- 
three years old. His native ability and his exemplary life commended 



History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 79 

him to his fellow Lutherans, and since they were unable to secure a 
regular pastor, they induced him to enter the Gospel ministry. He was 
licensed as a Catechist by the North Carolina Synod October 17, 1815, and 
was ordained by the Tennessee Synod on July 19, 1820 thus becoming 
one of its original members. He was highly esteemed by his parish- 
ioners and by his ministerial brethren and continued to render faithful 
service until his death on July 6, 1844, in his eighty-fifth year. He 
preached his last sermon six days before his death. 

During the next three decades, the Synod continued to develop 
along the lines which it had previously followed. Thirty-six pastors 
were ordained and seven were licensed; 18,471 infants, 1,143 adults and 
340 slaves were baptized; and 9,260 were received by confirmation. Many 
of the pastors, sometimes as many as one-third, did not report; other- 
wise these figures would have been larger. Twenty-six congregations 
were received during the fourth decade and eight during the fifth. 

This period also brought the first material loss of pastors and 
congregations to the Synod through the organization of a new Synod. 
From time to time, a few pastors and congregations had been dismissed 
to newly organized Synods, but it was not until 1860 that a new Synod 
composed entirely of members of the Tennessee Synod, was formed. At 
the fortieth convention which was opened on Saturday before the third 
Sunday in October, 1860, the following ministers belonging to the Synod 
and residing in the State of Tennessee, viz.: A. J. Brown, J. K. Hancher. 
J. C. Barb, J. M. Shaffer, J. Cloninger, James Fleenor and J. B. Emmert, 
with the congregations under their charge, laid a petition before the 
Synod, for an honorable dismission from this body for the purpose of 
forming a new Synod in East Tennessee. They stated that they were 
prompted to take this step by practical considerations and that, "We 
are by no means disaffected toward our brethren with whom we have 
been so long and pleasantly connected . . . Nor do we, in the formation 
of a new Synod, contemplate any change in the doctrinal basis upon 
which our Synod was organized, nearly half a century ago, and upon 
which she has ever since uniformly and firmly stood. With this we are 
satisfied, and upon this we intend still to stand." 

The Synod answered this petition by adopting the following: "Re- 
solved, that while we are sincerely sorry to sever the ties which have 
bound them to us as a part of our Synod, we feel it to be our duty 
to grant their request, with the fervent prayer^ that the smiles and 
rich blessings of the great Head of the Church may rest upon them, 
and that all their efforts to extend the Redeemer's Kingdom may be 
crowned with abundant success." 

The pastors in East Tennessee and the delegates from their con- 
gregations met in Zion Church, Sullivan County, Tennessee, on December 
29, 1860, and continued in session until January 2, 1861, and unanimously 
resolved to organize themselves into a Synod to be known as the 
Evangelical Lutheran Holston Synod. At the time, there were at least 
sixteen congregations in Sullivan, Washington, Greene, Cocke, Sevier, 
Knox, and Monroe Counties. 



80 History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 

The practical problems which prompted the people in East Ten- 
nessee to organize a Synod of their own were not confined to that 
particular area, for the territory of Synod still extended from northern 
Virginia into South Carolina. Distances involved made it difficult for 
members to attend its meetings and to promote many of its activities. 
This was particularly true in the ordination of candidates for the 
ministry. As early as 1850, a called session of a part of the members of 
Synod was held in Koiner's Church, Augusta County, Virginia, at which 
Applicant Socrates Henkel was examined, and ordained to the office 
of Deacon. In answer to the petitions that were not infrequently ad- 
dressed to the body, Synod, at its convention in 1854, adopted the 
following: "Resolved, That a committee be appointed to devise a plan 
for the division of this Synod into District Synods, and report to the 
next meeting of Synod." This committee failed to report, whereupon 
Dr. S. G. Henkel offered the following preamble and resolution which 
were unanimously adopted. 

"Inasmuch as the committee, appointed last year, to report a 
plan for districting the Synod, failed to report, and as there are 
letters and petitions now before Synod, in reference to this matter, and 
which require our notice, therefore^ as the best answer we can return 
for the present, be it 

"Resolved, That, in order to meet the inconveniences which seem 
to present themselves for want of some annual meeting of our clergy, 
where young men may be examined and ordained, and also to give an 
opportunity to interchange views in reference to the wants of the church, 
and also to give occasion for united efforts in preaching — we would 
recommend that the members of this Synod, who reside near enough 
to each other for that purpose, hold some annual meeting, according to 
their own appointment, where they may transact such matters as would 
not seem to call for the united advice of Synod. This meeting might be 
termed a Special Conference." 

The ministers living in the Valley of Virginia promptly acted 
upon the recommendation and, on May 17, 1856, organized such a 
conference. In 1866, Synod granted the request of this conference that 
they be allowed to organize a Synod. Sentiment in the group, however^ 
was divided, and at the time appointed for the organization only three 
pastors. Revs. James E. Seneker, Henry Wetzel, and George Schumaker, 
together with their lay delegates, appeared. After some discussion, they 
proceeded to organize The Evangelical Lutheran Concordia Synod of 
Virginia. The Synod was not sufficiently strong to maintain a separate 
existence and was eventually absorbed by the Joint Synod of Ohio. 
Pastor Wetzel later returned to the Tennessee Synod, as did some of 
the congregations that had participated in the organization. Twenty 
years earlier, the Rev. Adam Miller, Jr. had withdrawn from the Synod, 
while under serious charges, and had formed the so-called Tennessee 
Synod Reorganized. Most of the congregations which followed him also 
came back to the Synod, but some did not and later united with the 
Joint Synod of Ohio, among them the historic St. Paul's near Newton, 
North Carolina. 



History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 81 

An unfortunate situation developed in North Carolina some years 
later which resulted in the loss of still other congregations, this time 
to the Missouri Synod. At its convention in 1875, the Synod received 
the information, through a letter from the Rev. J. M. Smith, that the 
congregations of Catawba County, North Carolina, had decided to es- 
tablish a high school of a strictly Lutheran character. Synod approved 
of the move and highly commended the enterprise. Considerable differ- 
ence of opinion existed among the pastors and congregations who were 
interested in the proposals as to where the school should be located; 
but it was finally opened at Conover, N. C, in 1877, and in 1883, it 
was taken under the care of the Synod. This school was first called 
Concordia High School and later Concordia College. 

The question of location was again raised in 1890 and resulted in 
the establishment of a second school at Hickory, N. C, known as Lenoir 
College. That part of the Board of Trustees of Concordia College which 
favored the continuation of the school at Conover then entered into an 
agreement with the Mission Board of the English Synod of Missouri by 
which the school passed under the control of the Missouri Synod. As 
a result, that Synod gained a foothold in the territory, and the Tennessee 
Synod ultimately lost some of its older congregations to it. Among 
them were St. John's, St. Peter's, Bethel, and Concordia. 

In 1866, a plan to create a conference made up of pastors and 
churches in South Carolina and to divide those in North Carolina into 
three districts was approved; but these conferences were not to be 
allowed to transact any business that properly belonged to the Synod. 
The South Carolina Conference was duly formed; but in 1868, Synod 
rejected the proposal to divide the North Carolina territory and, instead, 
formed the North Carolina Conference of the Tennessee Synod. These 
three conferences: Virginia, North Carolina, and South Carolina, con- 
tinued to exist until mergers with other Synods were effected. 

Two other noteworthy developments fall within this period, both 
brought about by conditions incident to the War Between the States. 
They grew out of the responsibility felt for the spiritual welfare of 
men in the armed services and for the Negroes who had been freed at 
the end of the war. At the convention held in 1863, a committee con- 
sisting of the Revs. A. J. Cox, P. C. Henkel and Henry Goodman and 
Mr. J. F. Plonk was appointed to prepare a plan for missionary work in 
the Confederate Army. After careful study, the committee submitted the 
following: 

"Whereas, this Synod is fully aware of the great necessity of 
doing something to supply our own soldiers in the Confederate Army with 
the preaching of the Gospel by our own ministers, be it resolved, 

"1. That we establish an Army Mission in the following manner: 
Let as many ministers in connection with this Synod as will subscribe this 
resolution, be obligated to perform missionary labors in the Confederate 
Army, for the period of one month in each year, if our funds and the 
situation of the army will permit. 



82 History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 

"2. That two ministers go at the same time, and that in rotation, 
being chosen by lot at each annual meeting of Synod. 

"3. That their expenses, at least, be defrayed by contributions 
obtained from the congregations by solicitation. 

"4. That those ministers, having performed such missionary visits 
as herein required, shall make a return of their traveling expenses to the 
treasurer hereinafter provided, who shall pay said expenses out of the 
funds he may have in hands for said purpose. 

"5. That a treasurer be appointed whose duty it shall be to re- 
ceive such money as may be collected for the purpose herein stated. 

"6. That it be the duty of ministers, associated with the enterprise, 
to take up collections in their several congregations, semi-annually; and 
that they forward said collections to the treasurer." 

This was adopted, and Mr. Moses Harmon was elected treasurer and 
Rev. P. C. Henkel corresponding secretary. 

The concern for the spiritual welfare of Negroes was not new. 
At its third convention, held in St. James' Church, Greene County, 
Tennessee^ delegate Conrad Keicher had proposed the question, "Is 
slavery to be considered an evil?" In reply. Synod unanimously resolved, 
"That it is to be regarded a great evil in our land and that it desires 
the government, if possible, to devise some way by which this evil can be 
removed." Synod further advised every minister to admonish every 
master to treat his slaves properly, and to exercise his Christian duties 
toward them. At its convention in 1866, the following action with 
respect to Freedom was taken: 

"Whereas, The Colored people among us no longer sustain the 
same relation to the white man they did formerly, and that change 
has transferred the individual obligations and responsibility of owners 
to the whole church, and, 

"Whereas, Some of them were formerly members of our congre- 
gations and still claim membership in them, but owing to the plainly 
marked distinctions which God has made between us and them, giving 
different colors, etc., it is felt by us, and them also, that there ought 
to be separate places of worship^ and also, separate ecclesiastical or- 
ganizations, so that everyone could worship God with the least possible 
embarrassment; and 

"Whereas these colored people are considered firm adherents of 
our church, and we feel it our imperative duty to assist them in adopting 
such measures as will meet best the necessities of their present condition; 
be it, therefore resolved, 

"1. That whenever any of our colored brethren desire to preach, 
they may make application to some one of the ministers of our Synod, 
who shall inform the president, when it shall be the president's duty 
to appoint two ordained ministers who, in connection with two laymen 
whom they may choose, shall constitute a committee to examine the 



History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 83 

candidate upon his motives and mental and moral qualification, and, if 
they are satisfied, to license him to preach, catechise, baptize, and 
celebrate the rites of matrimony among those of his own race, according 
to the usages of our church, until the next regular session of Synod 
thereafter^ when said committee shall report. This license, however, 
does not authorize them to preach in our churches, or to take part in 
our ecclesiastical meetings; nevertheless, they are permitted to worship 
with us as heretofore, yet we advise them to erect houses for them- 
selves in which they may worship. 

"2. That we will use every reasonable means to aid them in 
organizing and building up congregations." 

Apparently this plan did not prove too effective. There is no 
indication that capable leaders were found or that congregations were 
organized. In 1881, this further action was taken: "Resolved, That the 
ministers of this Synod make all efforts in their power to educate re- 
ligiously the colored people by preaching, lecturing, and catechization, 
with a view sooner or later of getting men of their own color to 
look after the spiritual interests of their race in connection with the 
Lutheran Church." 

The numerical growth of the Synod during the first half century 
of its history was encouraging. Figures, if they were available, could 
not begin to tell the story of what was accomplished; for they are 
only the material evidence of growth and do not always reflect the 
resistance overcome or the spiritual strength developed. However, such 
records as do exist give evidence of the progress made. During the 
period, the Synod grew from nine congregations in East Tennessee to 
approximately eighty congregations in four states; and this does not 
take into account the congregations that were transferred to other 
Synods. 

This growth continued through the second half century. During 
this period, fifty-four new congregations were organized, and the num- 
ber of active pastors was materially increased. Changed conditions 
made the call for Home Missionary work beyond the normal bounds of 
the Synod less pressing and gave an opportunity for concentrated effort 
in a more restricted field. The church began to recognize the importance 
of establishing congregations in the growing towns and cities of the 
territory, and of giving them financial assistance where the prospect 
for development was good. At the convention in 1875, a committee 
was appointed to prepare a constitution and regulations for Home Mis- 
sionary operations. Its report, submitted and adopted at the next con- 
vention^ provided: That Synod shall elect annually an Executive Com- 
mittee which shall have charge of missionary work between the 
conventions of Synod. This committee shall elect one of its members 
treasurer who shall hold and disburse the missionary moneys according 
to the direction of the committee. It may establish or discontinue 
missions, employ or dismiss missionaries, and shall have the superin- 
tendence and control of all missionary operations during its term of 
office. It shall keep a clear and correct account of all its transactions 



84 History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 

and shall report annually to Synod. Every pastor in connection with 
the Synod shall be required to take up collections in each of his 
congregations, in the most judicious manner, for missions. All moneys 
collected from congregations or otherwise, and donations for the purpose 
of missions, shall be paid over to the chairman of the committee, for 
which he shall give his receipt. 

In 1882, a committee was appointed to meet with a similar 
committee from the North Carolina Synod to make some arrangements 
to prevent conflict in church work. This committee, which was com- 
posed of Revs. L. A. Bikle and S. Rothrock and Mr. D. R. Hoover, from 
the North Carolina Synod, and Revs. A. J. Fox and P. C. Henkel and Mr. 
Ambrose Costner, from the Tennessee Synod, worked together amicably 
and was able to agree unanimously upon a report to be submitted 
to the two Synods. This report, which had been adopted by the North 
Carolina Synod earlier in the year, was submitted to the Tennessee 
Synod at its meeting in October, 1883. It was carefully considered and 
adopted by item and then^ with great readiness and unanimity, it was 
adopted as a whole. 

This newly arounsed interest in Home Missions began to bear 
fruit immediately. Holy Trinity, Hickory, and St. Mattrew's, Kings 
Mountain, were organized in 1876; The Church of the Good Shepherd, 
Mount Holly, in 1881; St. John's, Cherry ville, in 1883; Holy Communion, 
Dallas, in 1886; St. John's, Statesville, in 1888; St. Lukes, Monroe, in 
1890; and Holy Trinity, Gastonia, in 1898. Similar activity was also 
manifested in the Virginia and South Carolina Conferences of the Synod. 

This activity also reflected a growing concern, on the part of the 
Synod, in the administrative work of the church. Changing conditions 
were making necessary a modification of the long established policy that 
Synod was only an advisory body. Now it was assuming responsibility 
for the active promotion and direction of missionary activity. The same 
was true with regard to Beneficiary Education. For many years, the 
Synod did nothing more than to encourage its congregations to assist 
young men in their preparation for the ministry. In 1852, Synod re- 
solved, "That, in reference to Beneficiary Education and Missionary 
operations, societies for these purposes be founded disconnected with 
the Synod." In 1856, it was earnestly recommended that the congre- 
gations connected with the Synod establish congregational treasuries 
for the purpose of aiding domestic missionaries^ and young men of hope- 
ful piety and promising talents who are laboring to qualify themselves 
for the work of the Gospel ministry in the Lutheran Church. The next 
year, the following was presented by the Rev. Henry Wetzel and was 
adopted: 

"Whereas, it has been customary in this Synod, when applied to, 
to receive under her care, as students of theology, young men; and 
whereas, we wish to make this as beneficial to them and as safe to 
ourselves as possible, therefore, 

"Resolved, That young men making application to be received 
under the care of this Synod, as students of theology, be examined as 



History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 85 

to the motives by which they are prompted in seeking their way into 
the ministry; and the extent to which they are willing to qualify them- 
selves for this high and holy calling. 

"Resolved, That^ if any young man of good report, suitable talents, 
and a willingness to qualify himself suitably for the ministry, make 
application as above, but has not the means to qualify himself, we then 
exert ourselves to secure to him the needed assistance. 

"Resolved, That the examination be conducted by a committee of 
three ministers and four laymen, and that they report to Synod." 

At its convention in 1869, the Synod adopted a plan by which funds 
for Beneficiary Education were to be collected and applied; and by such 
action, it formally assumed responsibility for this work. 

In the foregoing review of the Synod's missionary activities, its 
territorial expansion, and its numerical growth, it has been necessary to 
omit much material that would have been interesting and informative. 
Some of this is contained in the sketches of individual congregations, 
in the tabulated information about pastors who were at one time con- 
nected with the Synod, and in the sections devoted to educational de- 
velopments and auxiliary organizations, all of which are included in 
this book. To this might be added the following information gathered 
from the final Parochial Report of the Synod printed in the Minutes of 
the Merger Convention in 1921: 

Number of Ministers 60 

Number of Congregations 134 

Baptized Members 21,503 

Confirmed Members 15,228 

Communing Members 9,870 

Total Expended for Local Work $,75,823 

Total Expended for Benevolence $27,672 

Total for All Purposes $103,495 

Foremost in the minds of the Synod's founders was the need of 
preserving sound Lutheran doctrine and practices, and of administering 
the means of Grace to widely scattered and often unchurched Lutherans. 
In the prosecution of these aims, they early realized the importance of 
making available for general distribution basic materials for indoctri- 
nation and orderly worship. Reference has already been made to steps 
taken to circulate the Cathechism, the Augsburg Confession, and other 
material dealing with the historic doctrines of the Lutheran Church. 
This was a long process which did not reach its full fruition until the 
publication of the Book of Concord in 1851. 

Developments in the field of worship were positive but even more 
gradual. Action was taken at the second convention to the effect that 
a liturgy be prepared for the use of the congregations of the Synod, 



86 History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 

arranged according to the Scriptures and the Augsburg Confession; that 
Rev. Paul Henkel be appointed to attend to this matter as soon as prac- 
ticable; that 300 copies be printed, and that the expense be defrayed by 
the several treasuries. Pastor Henkel had, in 1810, published a German 
hymnal containing 246 hymns and, in 1816, another in English which 
was later improved and enlarged. There is no evidence that he was 
able to carry out Synod's instruction that he prepare a liturgy. In 1838, 
the Revs. Ambrose Henkel, Jacob Killian and Jacob Stirewalt were in- 
structed to prepare a liturgy for the use of the church. This was done 
and the liturgy was approved by the Synod and published in 1840. It 
was revised in 1858 and continued to be the approved liturgy of the Synod 
for many years. 

In the meantime other Lutheran bodies had become interested in 
the historic heritage of the church. The Southern General Synod had 
published a Book of Worship, and in 1868, the Church Book of the General 
Council had made its appearance. The need of some such book for use 
in the churches of the Tennessee Synod was realized, and in 1871, a 
committee consisting of the Revs. S. Henkel, A. J. Fox, and A. Costner, 
Esq., was appointed to examine various hymn books and liturgies, and 
to report at the next meeting of Synod. This committee reported that it 
had examined different hymn books and liturgies then in use (among 
them the Book of Worship which it regarded as a work of decided merit); 
and that it would recommend to the congregations in need of hymn 
books or books outlining the service of the church, "The Church Book 
for the Use of Evangelical Lutheran Congregations" which had been 
published by authority of the General Council in 1868. This Church 
Book was generally accepted by the congregations of the Synod and 
continued to be used until "The Common Service Book" was published 
in 1919. 

It is interesting to note that, at this same convention in 1871, the 
president recommended, in his report, the propriety of reviving the 
ancient custom of installation, and that the following action was taken: 
"Resolved, That it be the duty of the president^ with the consent of the 
pastor-elect and the congregation, to appoint a committee of installation 
in all succeeding changes in the pastoral relations in our Synod, to 
perform this ceremony." 

At the beginning of its history, the Synod adopted a policy of 
avoiding entangling alliances with other Synods, a policy to which it 
strictly adhered for more than sixty years. There were good and 
sufficient reasons for this at that time, for such Synods as were then in 
existence did not fully share with it the feeling that the preservation of 
a Conservative Lutheranism was a matter of the highest importance. Its 
relationships with other Synods and general bodies were limited to an 
infrequent written communication and an occasional exchange of fraterna ■ 
visitors. Some effort was made on both sides to effect a reconciliation 
between the North Carolina and Tennessee Synods, but the unwavering 
attitude of the latter on questions of doctrine and practice made it 
evident that no immediate agreement could be reached; and for many 
years there was not even an exchange of fraternal visitors. Efforts to 



History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 87 

bring about official cooperation with other Synods were attended with 
little more success. Such cooperation with various "Old School" or more 
conservative Synods which were not a part of the General Synod was 
occasionally suggested, but nothing was accomplished. In 1851, the 
following was adopted: "Resolved, That in reference to closer and more 
efficient connection between the Joint Synod of Ohio and this Synod, 
it is deemed inexpedient for Synod at present to propose any plan 
further than that of sending delegates." The question came up again 
in 1866, when the Tennessee Synod was invited to become a member 
of the Southern General Synod. Sincere interest in this proposition was 
manifested, but investigations carried on through several years finally 
resulted in a decision to decline the invitation. In 1876, the General 
Synod asked the Tennessee Synod to reconsider its previous action, but 
it declined to do so and took the following action: "Resolved, That, under 
existing circumstances, we regard it inexpedient to take any steps either 
toward uniting with or in any way connecting ourselves to any one of 
the General Lutheran Bodies in this Country." 

But the desire for closer cooperation among all of the Lutheran 
Synods in the South was so strong that it could not be successfully 
resisted. Even the more conservative members of the Synod came to 
realize this, and at its 1883 convention, it appointed the following 
delegates to represent it at a proposed diet to be held in Salisbury: 
Rev. S. Henkel, D.D., Rev. A. L. Crouse, Maj. A. Koiner, from Virginia; 
Rev. P. C. Henkel, D.D., Rev. C. H. Bernheim, Rev. M. L. Little, A. Costner, 
Esq., from North Carolina; Rev. J. S. Koiner and H. A. Meetze, Esq., from 
South Carolina. These representatives attended the diet in Salisbury 
and, at the convention in 1885, submitted the proposed basis for a 
more general union among the Evangelical Lutheran Synods in the 
South and also the Constitution, both of which had been adopted by the 
diet. The Synod adopted both of these documents and elected delegates 
to the next diet. The following is a part of the report of these 
delegates: 

". . . We, the undersigned delegates to said diet, held at Roanoke, 
cast the vote of the Evangelical Lutheran Tennessee Synod, which we had 
the honor to represent, in accordance with her instructions, in favor of 
the more general, organic union contemplated, and the actions of the 
other Synods concerned being favorable to such union, it was effected, 
on the Basis and Constitution indicated, under the name and title of 
the United Synod of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in the South. Thus 
with the Evangelical Lutheran Tennessee Synod and the Holston Synod, 
the Southern General Synod was merged into one general body. 

"We have reason to thank the Great Head of the Church, that the 
true confessions have been thus again formally recognized and ack- 
nowledged. The scriptural premises have, in this way, been laid 
down and agreed to, and by prudence, brotherly love, and the influence 
of the Holy Spirit, the conclusions must be, ultimately inevitable. But it 
will require patience and much judicious work, to attain that higher and 
more churchly plan in regard to doctrine and practice. 



88 History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 

"After its organization, important business was transacted by the 
United Synod, — some of which will require the attention of our Synod; 
as, foreign missions, important home missionary work, etc. We trust 
Synod will take such action in regard to these, as she may deem proper. 



"S. Henkel 
A. Koiner 
A. L. Crouse 



E. L. Lybrand 

C. M. Efird 

C. H. Bernheim" 



This report, together with two resolutions explaining more fully 
the position of the Tennessee Synod with regard to some disputed ques- 
tions such as: Ecclesiastical Union, Exchange of Pulpits, Promiscuous 
Communion or Altar Fellowship, Secret Society Worship, Chiliasm, and 
the maintenance of pure Lutheran doctrines and practices, were received 
and adopted by a rising vote. Thus, for the first time, the Synod 
had committed itself to organic cooperation with other Lutheran Synods. 
This action was not a repudiation of its past policy, but a recognition 
of the fact that a new order of things made cooperation both desirable 
and possible. It did not result in the loss of any of the essential things 
for which the Synod had stood throughout its history; but it did make 
possible a broader and more sympathetic appreciation of the work which 
other Lutherans were doing in the maintenance and propagation of the 
Faith, and it paved the way for the ultimate reunion of Lutherans in 
North Carolina into one great body with a common faith and a common 
task. 




Rev. Willis A. Deaton, D.D. 

President Tennessee Synod at 
Time of the Merger 



History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 89 

Throughout its history^ the Synod enjoyed the benefit of strong 
leadership. Henkel, Stirewalt, Moser, Fox and others are names which 
are woven into the fabric of this history. These are mentioned because, 
in each instance, families who bore them furnished several generations 
of outstanding leaders and because their representatives were active 
throughout almost the entire period of its existence. The men who bore 
these names, and many others who were associated with them, deserve 
fuller recognition than can be given in the pages of this brief history. 
Their names may be forgotten by all execpt the few who dig into the 
musty records of the past, but the fruits of their labors will live on. 
for they served faithfully and built well. Such records as are available 
attest to their ability, their zeal, their energy, and not infrequently, to 
their human frailties. Often in these records there is an outcropping of 
what might be called a doctrinal complex which, in some instances, 
made them appear narrow and intolerant. However that may be, the 
members of the United Evangelical Lutheran Synod of North Carolina 
and of the United Lutheran Church in America owe them a debt that can 
only be paid by a loyalty to the truth which they so valiantly defended. 



President Evangelical Lutheran Synod and Ministerium of North Carolina, 1919-1921, 

President United Evangelical Lutheran Synod of North Carolina, 1921-1947, 

President Emeritus United Evangelical Lutheran Synod of North Carolina, 1947- 



History of the Lutheran Church in N. C, 91 

CHAPTER VII 
Reunion 

On Friday, Saturday and Sunday, April 29tii to May 1st, 1803, a 
group of four Lutheran ministers who were serving congregations in 
North Carolina met at Pine (Union) Church, four miles east of Salisbury, 
and held a series of preaching services. On the following Monday, May 
2nd, they, together with lay representatives from fourteen congregations, 
met in Salisbury and organized the North Carolina Synod. On Monday, 
July 17th, 1820, five ministers, together with nineteen lay representatives 
from nine congregations, met in Solomon's Church, Greene County, Ten- 
nessee, and organized the German Evangelical Lutheran Tennessee Con- 
ference or Synod. On Tuesday evening, March 1st, 1921, eighty-eight 
ministers, together with eighty lay delegates, of the North Carolina and 
Tennessee Synods, met in St. John's Church, Salisbury, North Carolina, 
for divine services. At ten o'clock the following morning they met again 
for divine services at which time the Order for Public Confession was 
used and the Lord's Supper was administered. In the afternoon of the 
same day, they met once more and effected a merger of the two bodies. 

Historic events may be set down, as has been done in the foregoing 
paragraph, without adornment or explanation. But history is more than 
a collection of figures and dates, of official actions and approved docu- 
ments. Such are usually the outcome of much that has gone before; of 
hopes and prayers, of plans and patient effort. They are associated with 
the names of men and women who refuse to be satisfied with things as 
they are and seek to bring about that which they believe should be. 
This is eminently true of the three landmarks in the history of organized 
Lutheranism in North Carolina. Circumstances which preceded and at- 
tended the first two have, in so far as they are known and as space 
would permit, already been given. Much that is associated with the third 
is a matter of common knowledge for, at the time this is written, almost 
half of the ministers who took part in the Merger Convention are still 
living, including four of the six members of the Joint Committee on Ar- 
rangements; and a record of much that transpired is preserved in the 
minutes of the two merging Synods. However, for the benefit of those 
who did not share this privilege, and of others who may not have easy 
access to the records, some effort must be made to present the story here. 

As complete as was the break in 1820, there were those on both 
sides who deplored the unhappy situation and hoped for a reconciliation. 
Dr. S. Henkel, in his History of the Tennessee Synod, has this to say: 
"It is hardly just to conclude that all those who followed out," the North 
Carolina Synod group, "were in full sympathy with this move and the 
doctrines of the leader, but were carried along rather by the force of 
circumstances and their situation."* Certainly there was a desire within 

* History of Tennessee Synod, p. 22. 



92 History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 

the North Carolina Synod to reach an understanding for, at the Conven- 
tion held in Organ Church in 1823, "A committee was appointed to cor- 
respond with Paul Henkel for the purpose of attempting to do away with 
the quarrels that have broken out between us and the ministers who 
have separated themselves from us." During the next few years, ap- 
proaches were made by both sides; but these efforts were without avail, 
and were soon abandoned; and for thirty years, each Synod held aloof 
from the other. In 1858, the Rev. S. Rothrock attended the meeting of 
the Tennessee Synod and was received as an advisory member; but 
it was not until ten years later that definite steps were taken to establish 
fraternal relations between the two bodies. The report of President N. 
Aldrich of the North Carolina Synod, 1868, contains this item, "My resi- 
dence in Charlotte has furnished frequent opportunities for interviews 
with our brethren of the Tennessee Synod, in which the disposition to 
lose sight of old issues was quite manifest. We recommend that a cor- 
responding delegate be elected to represent this Synod at the next annual 
convention of that body and to convey our friendly and Christian greet- 
ings to them as brethren of the same household of faith, and to request 
that a delegate be appointed in turn to meet with this Synod at its next 
Convention." The Rev. Prof. L. A. Bikle was elected as delegate and 
the Rev. N. Aldrich, alternate. The Minutes of the Tennessee Synod, 
1868, state that Rev. N. Aldrich presented his credentials as a delegate 
from the North Carolina Synod, and was received as such. Rev. J. M. 
Smith was chosen as a delegate to the next convention of the North 
Carolina Synod. 

This exchange of delegates soon resulted in an effort to bring 
about a union between the two bodies. At its convention in 1870, the 
North Carolina Synod adopted the following, "Resolved, That the Evan- 
gelical Lutheran Synod of North Carolina, do at the present meeting, 
appoint a committee of three ministers and two intelligent laymen to 
confer with a like committee from the Evangelical Lutheran Tennessee 
Synod, and that these committees, if possible, agree upon terms of union, 
to be submitted to their respective Synods, for adoption or rejection, at 
their next annual meeting thereafter." The President appointed the Rev. 
L. C. Groseclose, N. Aldrich and S. Scherer and Dr. P. A. Sifford and 
Captain J. A. Fisher as the North Carolina Synod representatives. Mem- 
bers appointed by the Tennessee Synod were the Revs. A. J. Fox, J. M. 
Smith and Timothy Moser and Messrs. Alexander Conrad and A. Costner. 
This committee met in Mt. Pleasant, N. C, April 25, 1871, and agreed on 
a Basis of Union which was recommended for adoption by both Synods. 
The North Carolina Synod adopted it without change, and the Tennessee 
Synod also adopted it, but with a few modifications. Subsequent action 
by the North Carolina Synod to the effect that all action in regard to 
union with other ecclesiastical bodies be postponed for five years put 
an end to the matter for the time being. 

Although the contemplated union failed to materialize, the two 
Synods continued to exchange delegates, and their members were drawn 
still closer together through various co-operative activities. Their rep- 
resentatives worked together in the United Synod. In 1900, the first of 



History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 93 

a series of annual reunions was held. These were attended by large 
numbers from both Synods. A free conference was held in St. John's 
Church, Salisbury, September 21-22, 1904, which was attended by fourteen 
ministers from the North Carolina Conference of the Tennessee Synod 
and twenty-five from the North Carolina Synod. In 1908, the first of a 
series of joint Sunday School normals was held at St. James' Church, 
Concord. The second was held at Lenoir College in Hickory. 

It was not until 1914, however, that the next and final movement 
toward the long desired union of the two bodies got under way. At its 
meeting the previous year, the North Carolina Synod had appointed a 
committee consisting of the Revs. C. P. MacLaughlin, B. S. Brown, Sr., 
and R. L. Patterson, D.D., to prepare plans and a program for the proper 
celebration of the 400th anniversary of the Reformation and to report 
to the next convention. In its report, the committee recommended, among 
other things, "That the President of this Synod appoint a commission of 
three pastors and two laymen, to meet a similar commission from the 
Evangelical Lutheran Tennessee Synod, this Joint Commission to be 
herewith authorized to consider the proposition to unite all Lutherans of 
the state of North Carolina into one synodical body, this same to be 
entered upon with the earnest hope and prayers of the church that it 
may be consummated at such a date so as to celebrate the 400th anni- 
versary of the Reformation at some central place by a united Lutheranism 
in the state of North Carolina." 

Synod adopted this recommendation, and the following were ap- 
pointed as its members on the joint commission: the Revs. C. P. Mac- 
Laughlin, B. S. Brown and R. L. Patterson, D.D., and Prof. G. F. McAllister 
and Mr. A. H. Snider. The Tennessee Synod also acted favorably on this 
overture and appointed as its members on the joint commission the Revs. 
E. H. Kohn, Ph.D., J. H. Wannemacher and W. J. Boger, and Messrs. 
John M. Rhodes and J. H. C. Huitt. The commission held three meetings, 
the last on May 4, 1915, and formulated a tentative basis of union to be 
submitted to the Synods concerned. It further reported that, "It is the 
conviction of the joint commission that the time is ripe for the union of 
the two Synods." The North Carolina Synod adopted the basis, but 
the Tennessee Synod made changes that necessitated the continuance of 
negotiations. 

At times it looked as though the whole effort would again fail; 
but in 1919, the recommendation of the Tennessee Synod that a new Com- 
mission on Basis and Constitution be appointed was accepted by the 
North Carolina Synod, and the following were named as its representa- 
tives on the commission: The Revs. M. L. Stirewalt, N. D. Bodie, G. H. L. 
Lingle, and Prof. G. F. McAllister and Mr. P. M. Barger. Representa- 
tives from the Tennessee Synod were the Revs. W. A. Deaton, D.D., 
V. L. Fulmer, W. J. Roof and Messrs. J. J. George and B. F. Campbell. 

This joint commission held two meetings, on August 15th and 23rd, 
respectively. An organization was effected by the election of Prof. G. F. 
McAllister, chairman, and the Rev. M. L. Stirewalt, secretary. It rec- 
ommended to each of the two Synods that the constitution and by-laws 



94 History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 

appended to its report be adopted without change, as a Basis of Union 
and Constitution for the new Synod, or that it be rejected. In this 
connection, it called attention to the fact that said constitution and by- 
laws contained provision for amendment later when desired. It further 
recommended that this adoption be effected by the passing of certain 
resolutions which it proposed; and that, in the event of adoption, a Com- 
mittee on Arrangements be appointed composed of three members from 
each Synod, whose duty it should be: 

"(a) To inquire into and provide for the legality of the entire 
movement toward union; and, if necessary, to employ legal counsel. 

"(b) To arrange and perfect all details incident to the formation 
of the union and the holding of the first convention." 

The report was submitted to the two Synods by their respective 
members on the joint commission. The Tennessee Synod, at its 99th con- 
vention, held in Solomon's Church near Forestville, Virginia, September 
10-14, 1919, adopted the report after amending it by the addition of an- 
other by-law. The report was presented to the North Carolina Synod at 
its convention held in St. Mark's Church, China Grove, N. C, May 11-15, 
1920. The secretary of the joint commission submitted an additional 
report which indicated the changes that had been made and stated that, 
with these changes, the Tennessee Synod adopted the report of the joint 
commission by items and as a whole and continued the committee." 
Whereupon the report of the joint commission on basis and union was 
adopted by items and as a whole, and the additional report was received 
as information and ordered printed in the minutes. The Revs. M. L. 
Stirewalt and G. H. L. Lingle and Prof. G. F. McAllister were appointed 
as Synod's members on the Committee on Arrangements. 

At its 100th convention held in Emmanual Church, Lincolnton, 
N. C, beginning on October 20, 1920, its members of the joint commission 
offered the following: 

"In view of the action of the North Carolina Synod in adopting 
the report as presented by the commission, we, your committee, make 
the following recommendations: 

"1st. That the Synod reconsider its action at its last session in 
the adoption of the amended report of the commission on union with 
the North Carolina Synod. 

"2nd. That this Synod adopt the report as it was presented to the 
Synod at its last session without amendment." 

These recommendations were adopted, and the following were ap- 
pointed on the joint committee on arrangements: the Revs. J. C. Dietz 
and O. W. Aderholdt and Mr. J. J. George. 

Upon the adoption of the proposed constitution and by-laws as a 
basis of union by both Synods, and upon the appointment of the joint 
committee on arrangements, the way was clear for the consummation 
of the union. The committee immediately prepareo to carry out its as- 



History of the Lutheran Church in N, C. 95 

signment, and held its first meeting November 29, 1920. The Rev. J. C. 
Dietz was elected chairman and the Rev. M. L. Stirewalt secretary. The 
Honorables L. M. Swink and Bismark Capps, and Judge C. M. Efird 
were elected a committee of legal advisers. Three other meetings of 
the committee were held at which all details necessary to the completion 
of the union, including the time and places for called meetings of the 
Synods and the Merger convention were worked out. 

On Tuesday, March 1, 1921, the North Carolina Synod held a called 
meeting in Haven Lutheran Church, and the Tennessee Synod met in 
adjourned session of its 100th Convention, in St. John's Lutheran Church, 
both in Salisbury. Each Synod received and adopted the report of the 
joint committee on arrangements, and such resolutions as were necessary 
to prepare the way for the actual merger. An evening service was held 
in St. John's Church which was attended by the members of both Synods. 
Dr. R. B. Peery was the Liturgist, and the sermon was preached by the 
Rev. A. G. Voigt, D.D., on the subject, "Remembej- Jesus Christ." At 
ten o'clock Wednesday morning, March 2, representatives of the two 
Synods, visitors and Lutherans of the community, assembled to participate 
in Divine services. The Rev. J. L. Morgan, president of the North Caro- 
lina Synod, and the Rev. W. A. Deaton, D.D., president of the Tennessee 
Synod, conducted the service and administered the Lord's Supper. The 
sermon was preached by the Rev. M. G. G. Scherer, D.D., secretary of 
the United Lutheran Church in America, who had at one time been a 
member of the North Carolina Synod and whose ancestors had been 
among the early Lutherans who came to North Carolina from Pennsyl- 
vania. He used as the subject of his sermon, "The Church for These 
Critical Times." 

The Merger convention was called to order at 1:30 p.m., March 2, 
1921, by the Rev. J. C. Dietz, chairman of the committee on arrange- 
ments. Pastor Dietz was then elected temporary chairman, and the Rev. 
M. L. Stirewalt was elected temporary secretary. The Revs. H. B. Shaef- 
fer, secretary of the Tennessee Synod, and G. H. L. Lingle, secretary of 
the North Carolina Synod, presented certified lists of ministers and ac- 
credited delegates from their respective Synods. The roll call showed 
96 ministers and 88 lay delegates present, with twenty ministers and three 
lay delegates absent. 

The secretary of the committee on arrangements then presented a 
program of procedure for the Merger convention. This included reading 
of the Bill of Enactment and approval of the charter, consideration and 
adoption of the constitution and by-laws with proposed amendments, per- 
manent organization under the new constitution and by-laws, and the 
adoption of proposed resolutions. The several items were considered and 
the necessary action taken. The election of officers resulted as follows: 
president, Rev. Jacob L. Morgan, Salisbury, N. C; secretary. Rev. H. B. 
Schaeffer, Kings Mountan, N. C; statistical secretary, Rev. E. H. Kohn, 
Mt. Holly, N. C; treasurer, James D. Heilig, Esq., Salisbury, N. C. 
Upon the completion of its agenda, the convention adjourned subject to 
the call of the president at a time and place to be determined by the 
committee on arrangements. 



96 History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 

Since the Evangelical Lutheran Tennessee Synod was not an in- 
corporated body, it was necessary, in order to make the merger legal, 
that it be ratified by at least a majority of the congregations of that 
Synod. Identical copies of the Resolutions of Merger were submitted to 
each congregation of that Synod for ratification or rejection, the votes 
thereon to be returned to the secretary on or before May 1, 1921. By the 
time appointed, 94 congregations had voted to confirm and ratify them, 
and three had voted not to confirm and ratify them. Thus the merger 
of the Evangelical Lutheran Synod and Ministerium of North Carolina 
and the Evangelical Lutheran Tennessee Synod into the United Evangeli- 
cal Lutheran Synod of North Carolina was made effective as of March 2, 
1921. 

Separate adjourned meetings of the two Synods were held in Bur- 
lington, N. C, June 7-8, 1921, to transact all necessary business incident 
to the closing of their records as individual Synods. The adjourned ses- 
sion of the Merger convention of the United Evangelical Lutheran Synod 
of North Carolina was held in Macedonia Church, Burlington, on June 
8-10, at which time it proceeded to take over the work of the old Synods. 
Three young men, Messrs. Earl K. Bodie, Paul L. Miller and George W. 
Nelson, were ordained to the office of the ministry. 

A full record of proceedings connected with the merger of the 
two bodies is contained in the minutes for 1921. The cover page carries 
a reproduction of the seal of the merged Synods. In its center is a picture 
of Martin Luther under which are clasped hands bearing the dates 1803 
and 1820. Encircling the center are the words, The United Evangelical 
Lutheran Synod of North Carolina, and the date 1921. The wording on 
the cover is, "Minutes of the One Hundred and Eighteenth Annual Con- 
vention of the United Evangelical Lutheran Synod of North Carolina, 
together with the minutes of the called conventions of the Evangelical 
Lutheran Synod and Ministerium of North Carolina and of the Evangeli- 
cal Lutheran Tennessee Synod held in connection with the merger. 

Salisbury, N. C, March 1-2, 1921. 

Burlington, N. C, June 7-10, 1921. 

Included in the merger were pastors and congregations of the 
South Carolina and Virginia conferences of the Tennessee Synod. At 
their own request, those of the South Carolina conference were transferred 
to the South Carolina Synod in 1922, and those in the Virginia conference 
to the Virginia Synod in 1924. The territory of the Synod was thus re- 
stricted, for the firs+ time since 1803, to the State of North Carolina. 
This was a normal and desirable arrangement, but it was not accom- 
plished without a feeling of sadness on the part of those who had so 
long been associated with each other in a common fellowship and labor. 

The transactions of 1921 resulted in a United Lutheran Synod in 
North Carolina in at least two respects. Its members were united on a 
common Doctrinal Basis true to the historic confessions of the Lutheran 
Church; and they were bound together in a single organization for the 



History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 97 

promotion of the entire program of the church. But, as has already 
been indicated, the separate lines of development which had been followed 
since 1820, had resulted in traditions, fellowships, methods of operation, 
and even prejudices, that were peculiar to each group. Much had already 
been done through multiplied contacts and cooperative activities to mini- 
mize these divisive elements and to draw the groups closer together; but 
it was important that this process be continued and accelerated in order 
to bring about a deeper and more binding unity. Mention should be 
made of a few ways in which the officials of the new organization sought 
to accomplish this. 

The first of these was the arrangement of conference lines so that, 
in as far as possible, each of the conferences in North Carolina would 
embrace congregations and pastors from both of the merging Synods. 
While there was some overlapping, practically all of the congregations 
of the old North Carolina Synod were located east of a line running 
approximately north and south through Statesville and Charlotte; and 
the majority of the Tennessee Synod congregations were in territory west 
of that line. The work of establishing conference lines was placed in 
the hands of a special committee on districts and work of conferences, 
composed of the Revs. V. C. Ridenhour, M. L. Pence, P. D. Brown and 
B. D. Wessinger. In its report which was adopted at the adjourned meet- 
ing in Burlington, it recommended three conferences in North Carolina, 
as follows : 

"a. The Eastern Conference shall comprise all territory of the 
United Evangelical Lutheran Synod of North Carolina east of the fol- 
lowing geographical line: the Yadkin river and the western boundaries 
of Davie, Surry and Yadkin counties. 

"b. The Southern Conference shall comprise all territory of the 
United Evangelical Lutheran Synod of North Carolina included within 
the following boundary lines: The Yadkin river north to the main line 
of the Southern railroad; the Southern railroad south to the Cabarrus 
county line; west along the northern boundaries of Cabarrus, Mecklen- 
burg, Lincoln and Cleveland counties; and the western boundary of 
Cleveland County. 

"c. The Western Conference shall comprise all territory of the 
United Evangelical Lutheran Synod of North Carolina west of the western 
boundaries of the Eastern Conference, not included in the Southern Con- 
ference." 

The primary consideration in this arrangement was not compact- 
ness or convenience, but the obliteration of old Synod lines, and provision 
for more frequent contacts between congregations and pastors which had 
once belonged to one of the two groups. It served its purpose admirably 
and was continued until 1936, when it was no longer considered necessary. 
In that year, the territory was redistricted into four more compact con- 
ferences. These have continued to serve the Synod effectively in the 
carrying out of its program. 



98 History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 

The process of amalgamation was further advanced by the practice, 
where conditions justified it, of encouraging parishes which had formerly 
belonged to one group, when they became vacant, to call a former member 
of the other group. These new associations contributed materially to a 
closer fellowship and a more complete understanding between pastors 
and people who had once been separated by Synodical lines and afRiliations. 

Still another means used to consolidate the union made official by 
the merger was the publication of a Synodical paper. At the 1922 con- 
vention, memorials were received from four of the five conferences, each 
asking for the establishment of a Synodical monthly parish paper. A 
recommendation was adopted to the effect that this be done, and that 
a committee of three be appointed to act in cooperation with the Executive 
Committee of Synod who should be empowered to carry this recommen- 
dation into effect. The committee elected the Rev. A. R. Beck, editor of 
the paper, to be known as the North Carolina Lutheran, and the first 
issue was published in January, 1923. Dr. Beck continued to serve as 
editor until 1937, when he asked to be relieved. Rev. B. E. Petrea was 
chosen as his successor and served until 1950, when he, too, asked to be 
relieved. The present editor is the Rev. David F. Cooper who took the 
place of the Rev. Roscoe B. Fisher when he moved beyond the bounds of 
the Synod. The paper has served as a splendid medium for the promo- 
tion of the work of the Synod and its auxiliaries and for the dissemination 
of news about the various congregations and their activities. 

But it was perhaps the united effort in behalf of the great causes 
of the church that did more than anything else to weld the former mem- 
bers of the two Synods into one truly united body. When people are 
challenged by some great objective and work together to attain it, they 
are irresistibly drawn closer to each other. Two causes from among 
many may be used to illustrate this. Neither Synod had been indifferent 
to the causes of higher education and of church extension, but when their 
efforts were united, a new day had dawned and a new challenge had 
been accepted. 

In the field of higher education, there were difficulties to be over- 
come and a common interest in one great institution to be developed, but 
Lenoir Rhyne College soon became a real challenge to united effort in 
its behalf. In return, this institution began to pour into the churches 
of the Synod an increasingly large stream of trained leaders who had 
learned to know and appreciate each other. 

The president of the new Synod was deeply interested in the cause 
of Home Missions and Church Extension; and he soon imparted to its 
members some of his own enthusiasm and enriched it with his counsel 
made all the more valuable because it grew out of his many years of 
experience as developer and organizer on the field. As a result, the 
interest and activity which already existed in both Synods was intensified 
and broadened. Two field missionaries were soon at work, one in the 
eastern part of the state and the other in the western. These mission- 
aries, the Rev. S. White Rhyne and the Rev. N. D. Yount, had their 
headquarters at Rocky Mount and Shelby, respectively. 



History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 99 

Further evidence of the growing interest in the Home Mission 
Causo was provided at the 1922 convention, held in St. Matthew's Church, 
Kings Mountain. In his report, the President recommended that Synod 
give consideration, at that convention, to the matter of providing an en- 
dowment fund for Synodical Home Missions. The consideration of this 
recommendation together with the appeals for home mission work pre- 
sented on the floor of Synod, resulted in a proposal so unusual and so 
challenging that it is quoted in full. It was presented by Mr. W. A. 
Ridenhour. 

"November 17th, 1922 

"Having heard the appeals for Home Missions and Church Extension 
as presented on the floor of Synod and having seen the need graphically 
illustrated through a map of the Lutheran churches of North Carolina, 
a number of members of St. Matthew's Lutheran Church, Kings Mountain, 
N. C, at their own initiative, met in the Sunday School building last 
night and took the following action : We, the undersigned, do hereby 
agree to give $100.00 each for ten consecutive years; thus underwriting 
ten shares of $1,000.00 each toward a Permanent Loan Fund to be es- 
tablished by the United Lutheran Synod of North Carolina for Home 
Mission and Church Extension Work within the bounds of this state. 
Provided : 

1. That the said Synod establish a Permanent Loan Fund of $100,- 
000.00, the remaining ninety shares to be secured by the Synod from 
laymen within the state. The first payment to become due when the 
total one hundred shares have been subscribed. 

2. That this fund be used in Home Mission and Church Extension 
work in this state not already organized. 

3. That this fund be held and handled under the direction of the 
constituted authorities of this Synod." 

This was the initial step toward what later became known as 
the Brotherhood Loan and Gift Fund, since its promotion was subsequently 
taken over as a project of the State Brotherhood. The Women's Mis- 
sionary Society and the Luther League also became staunch supporters 
of the Home Mission cause and, each in its own way, worked to promote it. 

The merging of the two Synods in 1921 was the answer to many 
prayers. The obstacles that had for so long stood in its way could not 
have been removed had it not been for the Divine guidance and help 
which its advocates so evidently received. It was also a venture in 
faith. Naturally, there were misgivings in the minds of those who had 
embarked upon such a bold adventure; but again, they were ready to 
go forward together, relying on God's guidance and blessing. It is doubt- 
ful, however, whether the most hopeful envisioned the progress that would 
be made during the next thirty years. The men of today live too close 
to the period to be able to view it from the detached perspective of 
the historian and to appreciate the real significance of much that has 



100 History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 

transpired. However, this narrative would not be complete without some 
reference to trends, developments, and accomplishments since 1921. 

The United Lutheran Synod of North Carolina began its work under 
the leadership of a full-time president. The historic position of the 
Lutheran Church is and always has been that any minister chosen to 
fill a special office is first among equals; that he is entitled to exercise 
no powers or privileges not inherent in the office to which he has been 
appointed by his equals in the church; and that he is accountable to 
them for all his official actions. Further than that, it has been the 
policy of the Lutheran Church to limit these powers and privileges to 
those which were essential to the promotion of its interests and work. 
The Constitution of the North Carolina Synod, adopted at its first con- 
vention in 1803, simply states "Each Convention of Synod elects its presi- 
dent." The only specific duty mentioned is that, "The president will ap- 
point each day the pastor who shall offer prayer." Some duties and 
privileges were evidently regarded as inherent in the office, and others 
were added later; but at no time were they so numerous as to require 
more than a fraction of the incumbent's time and effort. The Tennessee 
Synod was even more fearful of a concentration of authority. Its basis and 
regulations, adopted at the first session, provided for the appointment of a 
chairman and secretary, and adds, "But it is not to be understood that 
these must serve in their positions throughout all sessions." So unimport- 
ant was the office of president regarded that, for many years the name 
or names of the presiding officers were not given in the minutes of the 
Tennessee Synod, and only in later years did this office resume real 
significance. 

At its 1919 convention, the North Carolina Synod adopted a recom- 
mendation of the Finance Committee to the effect that the president 
of this Synod be relieved of local pastoral work, and be put on a salary. 
It also conferred upon the president additional rights, powers, and duties. 
By this action, it became the second Synod in the United Lutheran Church 
to employ the full-time services of its president. The United Lutheran 
Synod of North Carolina continued this arrangement and, in its constitu- 
tion, provided that the term of office should be five years. 

At its Merger Convention, the Synod elected the Rev. Jacob L. 
Morgan to this office, a choice that proved to be a very happy one. Presi- 
dent Morgan, a native of Rowan County, N. C, was a graduate of North 
Carolina College and the Lutheran Theological Southern Seminary and 
had been ordained by the North Carolina Synod in 1902. His first parish 
was composed of Haven Church, Salisbury, and Christ Church, Spencer, 
both mission congregations; and his second was St. Enoch and Trinity 
Churches in Rowan and Cabarrus Counties. In 1907, he accepted a call 
to become field missionary of the North Carolina Synod and continued 
to serve in that capacity until he was elected full-time president of the 
Synod in 1919. His natural gifts for leadership, his experience as a 
full-time president, and his familiarity with the problems of the field, 
all fitted him for the new position. Much of the progress made by the 
Synod during the next quarter century may be attributed to his pro- 
gressive spirit, wise leadership, and untiring efforts. 



History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 101 

President Morgan's annual reports to Synod are, in themselves, a 
history of this period; but a few figures gleaned from his personal records 
will reveal something more of the nature and extent of his official activi- 
ties. These cover his two years as president of the North Carolina Synod, 
and his twenty-six years as president of the United body. Some are esti- 
mates, but they are quite evidently conservative. During this time, he 
preached 3,000 sermons, held 1450 conferences with congregational offi- 
cials, attended 500 meetings of church councils, presided over 151 meet- 
ings of the Executive, Mission, and Ministerial Education committees, at- 
tended 135 meetings of college and seminary boards, served as delegate 
to all conventions of the United Lutheran Church and served on its Board 
of Foreign Missions, Board of American Missions, and Executive Board. 
He also attended most of the meetings of Conferences and of the Synodical 
Auxilaries and consulted with their leaders in their committee meetings. 
Further than that, he carried on a voluminous official correspondence; 
and he became the pastor of the pastors of Synod, advising with them 
in their ministerial problems and sharing their personal joys and sorrows. 

During the same period, his official acts included: ordination of 
123 candidates for the ministry; installation of 368 pastors; participation 
in 117 dedications, 34 rededications, 30 blessings, and 68 corner stone 
layings. Under his administration, 37 congregations were organized, 78 
new houses of worship were built, and 116 church plants were equipped 
with additional educational facilities. 

These facts and figures, and many others that might have been in- 
cluded, are definitely a part of the history of the period. They are indi- 
cative of the way in which the organized activities of the Synod were ex- 
panding and becoming increasingly effective. More than that, they set 
up standards and established precedents for administrative work which 
have been effectively continued under the administration of Presidents 
Cromer and Conrad. 

The administrative work of the Synod so carefully planned and 
capably directed by President Morgan, has been continued and expanded 
during the administrations of his successors. At the 1947 convention, 
the Rev. Voigt R. Cromer was elected president and Dr. Morgan was 
elected president emeritus. President Cromer, whose father, the Rev. 
J. L. Cromer, had at one time been a pastor in the Tennessee Synod, 
was ordained by the South Carolina Synod in 1928, and served as a pastor 
in that Synod until 1930. From then until the time of his election to 
its presidency, he served continuously as a pastor in the North Carolina 
Synod, first at Emmanuel, Lincolnton; then at St. James', Concord; and 
finally, at Holy Trinity, Hickory. He continued to servo the Synod most 
acceptably until the convention in 1949, when he submitted his resigna- 
tion in order to accept the presidency of Lenoir Rhyne College. 

The Synod accepted this resignation with regret and proceeded to 
the election of a successor to fill out the remainder of the five-year term. 
Dr. P. D. Brown was elected, but after prayerful consideration, he de- 




Rev. F. L. Conrad, Sr., D.D. 
President United Evangelical Lutheran Synod of North Carolina 



History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 103 

clined to accept the office. Whereupon, the Synod elected its secretary, 
the Rev. Flavius L. Conrad, D.D., who was re-elected in 1952 to a full 
five-year term. 

President Conrad, a native of Davidson County, N. C, and a de- 
scendent on both his father's and his mother's side, of early German 
Lutheran settlers in that section of the State, was educated at Lenoir 
Rhyne College and the Lutheran Theological Southern Seminary, from 
which institutions he graduated in 1916 and 1919, respectively. He was 
ordained by the Tennessee Synod in 1919 and served as pastor of the 
Granite Falls Parish until 1921. From 1921 until 1949, he was pastor 
of Emmanuel Church, High Point. For twelve years prior to his election 
to the presidency of the Synod, he had served as its secretary and had, 
as such, gained an intimate knowledge of its operation that was to prove 
helpful to him in his new office. Under his leadership, the Synod has 
continued to develop most encouragingly. 

It is more difficult to write the story of other leaders whose 
work has contributed so largely to the forward movement of the Synod. 
Their number is so large and their contributions are so varied that they 
must be recognized as groups rather than individuals, groups which in- 
cluded pastors and laymen, men and women. These have served loyally 
as members of boards and committees, as leaders in conferences and in 
Synodical auxiliary organizations, and in many other capacities. In the 
promotion of any cause and in the consummation of any undertaking, 
the individual pastors have been recognized as the key men. Among 
them have been some of outstanding ability; but the average has been 
high, and the support which they have given has been loyal and effective. 
The same may be said about the leaders among the lay membership 
of the Synod. Their spirit of co-operation has been commendable, and 
at times, their vision and their faith have exceeded that of the pastors 
themselves. 

The Synod has profited immeasurably from the consecrated ser- 
vices of these leaders, from the president on down; and the result has 
been an advance all along the line. A well-rounded, closely integrated, 
and highly effective organization has been developed; new congregations 
have been organized and large parishes have been broken up into more 
effective units, and the total membership has steadily increased; a grow- 
ing sense of responsibility for the use of time, talents and material 
possessions has been manifested through multiplied service activities arid 
increased financial contributions; commendable progress has been made 
in the field of education from the parish level up to its institutions of 
higher learning; and last but not least, the inner spiritual life of the 
members has been fostered by providing more pastors, more frequent 
and varied services of worship, and by a more consistent use of the 
means of Grace. 

It is not always possible to measure the progress in some of these 
fields. The reports on the state of the church, once a part of every 
Synod and conference program, were often so general and stereotyped 



1922 


1951 


99 


167 


153 


179 


79 


130 


20,644 


41,385 


13,805 


30,383 


$43,059 


$199,909 


88,562 


629,689 


391,906 


2,090,034 



104 History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 

as to be of little value, and they have largely been discontinued. On 
the other hand, modern statistical reports are a reasonably accurate index 
to membership changes and financial contributions. An effort is made 
here to show progress made during the thirty-year period by a comparison 
of some items in the reports carried in the minutes for 1922 and 1951. 
Figures of the Virginia and South Carolina Conferences have been sub- 
tracted from the totals given in the 1922 report, as their inclusion would 
not present a true picture of normal growth. 

Number of Ministers 
Number of Congregations 
Number of Parishes 
Confirmed Members 
Communing Members 
Paid on Apportionment 
Total Benevolence 
Total Expended 

The influence and activities of the Synod have extended far beyond 
its territorial limits and its local organization. Both the North Carolina 
and Tennessee Synods took part in the formation of the United Lutheran 
Church in America in 1918; and when the United Evangelical Lutheran 
'Synod of North Carolina was formed in 1921, it took its place in that 
body as the third oldest of the constituent Synods. In 1950, it ranked 
tenth among the thirty-three Synods in both confirmed and communing 
membership. It has participated in all activities of the general body, 
and its members, both ministers and laymen, have repeatedly served on 
all of its major boards and committees. At the present time, nine min- 
isters and five laymen are serving in such a capacity. 

The Synod shares with other Southern Synods responsibility for the 
maintenance and operation of the Lutheran Theological Southern Semi- 
nary at Columbia, South Carolina; the Lutheran Children's Home of the 
South at Salem, Virginia; and the Lowman Home for the Aged and 
Helpless at White Rock, South Carolina. Together with the South Caro- 
lina and Georgia-Alabama Synods, it supports and operates Lutheridge, 
a summer assembly ground, at Arden, North Carolina. The Synod is also 
privileged to have two directors on the board of the Sipes Orchard 
Home, an institution for the care and training of underpriviledged boys, 
located near Hickory, North Carolina, and gives this institution its moral 
support. 

In 1935, the North Carolina Council of Churches was organized 
for the purpose of promoting Christian fellowship among the Protestant 
communions in North Carolina, and of serving as a medium of inter- 
church counsel and advise in matter affecting the progress of Christianity 
in the State. The Synod agreed to enter into a consultative relationship 
with this body, subject to the approval of the United Lutheran Church, 
and to send representatives to its meetings. This relationship has con- 



History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 105 

tinued, and in this way, the Synod has been able to exert an influence 
upon the trend of Protestant development in the state and to share in 
the benefits of a broader contact without compromising its distinctive 
position. 

More than two hundred years have passed since the first Lutherans 
established permanent settlements in North Carolina and organized con- 
gregations based on the faith and doctrines of their Lutheran forefathers. 
The difficulties which they encountered, the heroic and successful effort 
which they made to establish themselves and their church in a new land, 
the strength of their faith and the enduring quality of their work, are 
now history. Almost one hundred and fifty years have gone by since a 
few pioneer ministers and laymen banded together to establish an organ- 
ized Lutheran body in the State. The difficulties which they and their 
successors had to overcome, the breach which left them a house divided 
against itself, the century of separate development, and the ultimate 
realization of the long cherished desire for a united Lutheran body in 
North Carolina, are also matters of history. Thirty years of additional 
history have been made since the pioneers of a new day joined hands in 
the United Lutheran Synod of North Carolina and faced the future to- 
gether. Under God's guidance, and with His blessing, those men and their 
successors have been able to build up a strong and united force such as 
even the most hopeful men of fifty years ago would have believed impos- 
sible. Their achievements, and those of a long line of consecrated men 
and women who preceded them, are a part of the rich heritage that has 
been passed on to those who live today. The future and the making of 
its history lie ahead. 



106 History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 



EDUCATIONAL 
DEVELOPMENTS 




Rev. Voigt Rhodes Cromer, D.D. 

President Lenoir Rhyne College 

President United Evangelical Lutheran Synod 

of North Carolina, 1947-1949 



History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 109 

Educational Developments 

Where there is an Evangelical Lutheran there is Christian edu- 
cation, born of the Word and nourished by it. The Holy Scriptures are 
inseparably woven into hie life. The family Bibles brought by the 
migrants from Pennsylvania to the territory which is now North Caro- 
lina were the textbooks from which the children learned to read. Well 
worn copies, some of which are now in the Lenoir Rhyne College library, 
testify to constant use made of these volumes. But the early settlers who 
are the spiritual ancestors of those v/ho compose the membership of 
our Synod were not content with lay teaching by parents and com- 
munity leaders. They pressed the matter of an ordained ministry 
upon the mother church until pastors were sent to preach and to teach 
the Word. The pastors who finally came had been carefully examined 
v/ith respect to their educational and spiritual attainments and found 
worthy. The difficulty of securing pastors from the homeland was so 
great that it became evident that members of the local church must 
be trained. Resources for sending candidates for the ministry to 
established schools were lacking, therefore the well trained men 
who had come began to teach others to follow them. Faculties 
were small and facilities meager but standards were high. Those 
first candidates were required to translate the New Testament from 
the Greek to the vernacular. An accurate account of those first schools 
is unobtainable, and a complete list has not been preserved. 

During the one and three-quarter centuries since the Pennsylvania 
German migrants settled the central and western parts of North Cro- 
lina, the customary means of education have been used. {The early 
instruction of children came through family worship and the use of 
the Bible in the home to teach reading; then followed catechization 
and the preaching of the Word. Sunday schools were established to 
teach reading and worship, while printed discourses and essays were 
distributed freely. The American Bible Society was fostered with its 
program of the distribution of the printed Word. Schools were founded 
to train pastors and to promote culture among the laity. 

There was always an insistence upon an educated ministry. 
The sending of a delegation to Germany to secure the services of edu- 
cated pastors is sufficient evidence of the depth of this desire. When 
suitable men were brought to the field the great difficulty of bringing 
them so far led to early efforts to train others locally. 

Sunday Schools. Sunday schools of a catechetical nature are said 
to have been founded in America as early as 1764. The movement be- 
gun by Robert Raikes in 1780 soon found its way to America to serve 
underprivileged children by teaching reading and writing. These 
schools, fostered by the churches, were under religious leadership. Me- 
moirs of the Moravians in North Carolina reports under date of February 
7, 1813 with respect to Beaverdam and Bethlehem Lutheran churches, near 



110 History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 





Rev. Robert A. Yoder, D.D. 

First President of 
Lenoir College 




Prof. S. A. Wolf 

Principal 
Gaston Female College 




Rev. J. H. C. Fisher 

President Mont Amoena 

Female Seminary 



Prof. H. T. J. Ludwig, Ph.D. 

First Graduate of North 

Carolina College 



History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. Ill 

Salem, N. C: "Pastor Shober serves these churches every four weeks, 
and on the other Sundays free school is held there and the young 
people are instructed in reading and singing; adults also attend." 
No record can be found showing when these schools began. In the 
minutes of the Lutheran Synod of N. C. 1833 the president reports two 
Sunday schools. Early parochial reports do not list such items so it is 
impossible to follow closely the extension of this work. There are 
occasional exhortations in the minutes of Synod to provide Sunday 
schools in all congregations. 

Sunday schools were instruments of the emotional religious revival 
of the early years of the nineteenth century and were not readily accepted 
by some Lutherans. In 1861 a committee was appointed by the Ten- 
nessee Synod to consider the advisability of establishing them and 
was discharged in 1863 without a recorded report. Prior to this there 
v/as discussion and recommendation in the North Carolina Synod with 
respect to suitable literature for use in the schools. 

By the end of the nineteenth century Sunday schools were estab- 
lished in practically all Lutheran congregations in the state and a fairly 
wide choice of literature was available. At this time there was general 
effort throughout the country to improve literature for the schools and 
teaching in them. Much of this interest centered in grading the les- 
son material. In the General Council of the Lutheran Church the Rev. 
Dr. Theodore E. Schmauk began to produce and edit a graded series 
of lesson helps. This was introduced in some schools in North Carolina. 

In November, 1907 the N. C. Conference of the Tennessee Synod 
resolved: "That a committee be appointed to consider the matter of 
a Summer Normal for Sunday school workers; to learn how many con- 
gregations will furnish one or more students for this school; consult with 
the Trustees of Lenoir College concerning the use of the college build- 
ings and consider the problem of securing competent instructors. This 
committee to report at next meeting of Conference." The committee 
reported favorably in March, 1908 and recom.mended that the Lutheran 
Synod of North Carolina be invited to join in the effort. The North 
Carolina Synod appointed a co-operating committee. 

Pastors John Hall and James F. Deal and Mr. John J. George from 
the N. C. Conference of the Tennessee !7ynod and pastors M. M. Kinard, 
Ph.D. and H. A. McCullough and Prof. G. F. McAllister began the work. 
This committee had the task of developing and organizing a new ven- 
ture of faith and of allaying mutual distrust of individuals in each Synod. 
This was the first united work on a state-wide basis undertaken 
by the two Synods since 1820. It succeeded because of the deep 
interest of each group in Christian education. 

The first school met in St. James Church, Concord, N. C, in July 
1908. The congregation provided free entertainment. About 150 reg- 
istered, others attended. The Rev. W. L. Hunton, an assistant to Dr. 
Schmauk, came from Philadelphia and the Rev. E. C. Cronk and Mrs. 
Cronk (nee Scherer) from Atlanta. Other leaders were found within 



112 History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 

the state. The success of the first school made annual repetition es- 
sential. The second session was held at Lenoir Rhyne College with 
free entertainment. In succeeding years a moderate charge for enter- 
tainment was made. The war years saw the work interrupted. Resuming 
the sessions in 1920 the name was changed from Sunday School Normal to 
Summer School for Church Workers. There was also a recommendation 
for an assembly ground which, after many years, resulted in the estab- 
lishment of Lutheridge Assembly Grounds, Arden, N. C, as our assembly 
center for the Lutheran Church in the Southeast. 

In August, 1925 a Lutheran State Sunday School Association was 
formed in connection with the Summer School for Church Workers. Synod 
had approved this organization at the session of the preceding year. 
In order that the Sunday Schools might receive proper emphasis the 
Synod was divided into fourteen regional districts. In 1928 it was decided 
to have a meeting separate and apart from the Summer School. Synod 
urged all schools to participate in the work of the convention. A 
Committee on Parish Education included this work of the convention 
in its program. The convention served the Synod faithfully for ten 
years and was again united to the Summer School. 

Latest available statistics report 166 schools within the bounds 
of the United Lutheran Synod of North Carolina, 3547 staff members, 
32483 pupils in attendance and 716 in the home department. Excellent 
literature is available with many trained teachers. 

The printed word. North Carolina Lutheranism has always been 
conscious of the value of the printed word. In 1817 Synod ordered the 
printing of the "Book Called Luther" in English, "Containing a history 
of the Reformation, the growth and extension of the church, its cultus, 
rules and regulations with short extracts thereof, also the Augsburg 
Confession and citations and stories from Luther's writings regarding 
his doctrines and character." These books were sold throughout the 
Carolinas and in adjacent states to inform Lutherans and to show 
non-Lutherans what the church belie\ed and taught. 

It was the custom to append sermons and theological disserta- 
tions to the published minutes of Synod and to have like matter printed 
in pamphlets for free distribution or for sale at cost. Very early there 
appeared periodicals to inform the people and to stimulate church 
loyalty and active Christian faith. A complete list is not available. 
"The Lutheran" from the General Council, the "Observer" from the Gen- 
eral Synod, "Our Church Paper" from New Market and the "Lutheran 
Church Visitor" from Columbia served the people with news and doctrinal 
discussions, sometimes also as media for controversy. At New Market 
the Henkels published the first American English Book of Concord in 
1851. Translations from the German and Latin were made by the Revs. 
Ambrose and Socrates Henkel, the Rev. J. Stirewalt, the Rev. H. Wetzel 
and the Rev. J. R. Moser, using a translation of the Smaller Catechism 
made by the Rev. David Henkel. 



History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 113 

Pamphlets of a controversial nature are to be found from the 
beginning to our own time 

Teaching and preaching. In the minutes of 1806 it is "Resolved: 
that no pastor in our connection shall confirm children, except in case 
of absolute necessity, without a six weeks preparation beforehand." 
Dr. Bernheim quotes Rev. Roschen: "My catechumens, whom I have 
instructed three days in every week for seven weeks, consist partly of 
married persons, some of them as old as thirty years, and young per- 
sons from sixteen to twenty years of age." The need for an educated 
ministry was imperative because the pastors must educate. With them 
church membership must be more than the impulse of an aroused 
conscience or hysterical fear of eternal damnation. It must be an in- 
formed understanding of salvation through the blood of a divine Redeem- 
er and an abiding trust in a loving Father in heaven. A German monk 
had agonized that his fellowmen might be led into the faith which would 
free them from slavish obedience to arbitrary laws and bring them into 
the glorious freedom of love for righteousness through love of and for a 
benevolent Creator. 

Luther's Smaller Catechism was the accepted text. It was mem- 
orized with proof texts. An annotated Smaller Catechism known as the 
Carolina Catechism was published in Germany and supplied to the 
Lutherans in the Carolinas. 

Catechising must have been exhc^usting labor. Illiteracy of cate- 
chumens, the fewness of catechists and the scattered population all 
added to the burden. One of the constant calls of those without a 
pastor was for a catechist. Later in the life of the Synod some pastors 
must have neglected this teaching because one finds numerous exhor- 
tations to practice it. 

Sermons were numerous and lengthy. At Synods and Conferences 
one preacher followed another immediately. Often two pastors preached 
at the same time, one in the building and another in the grove. Travel- 
ing missionaries preached daily or several times in a day if groups 
could be gathered in a home or at some central location. The pastor's 
visit by the fireside was an occasion for "godly discourse". Sermons 
were discussions of fundamentals in faith and life. Few were shorter 
than an hour and many were much longer. Some were strongly 
inclined toward a pessimistic view of life and exhortation to beware 
of eternal damnation. The funeral sermons preserved for our reading 
seem gruesome in warning against c<^ernal damnation. The pastors 
met the rugged conditions of a rude frontier civilization with boldness 
and arduous effort, determined to minister salvation in such manner 
as to save their fellow men by the grace of God. 

Schools. The difficulty of securing educated leaders from the 
mother church in Europe made it imperative to train men locally. Dr. 
G. D. Bernheim quotes the patriarch Muhlenberg: "True, enough teach- 
ers and false apostles may be found, who pervert the Word of God, 



114 History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 

The Southern Seminary is one of the oldest Lutheran schools in 
this country. It was opened in 1830, in Colonel John Eichelberger's 
home, near Pomaria, S. C. From there it was moved to Lexington, New- 
berry, and Columbia, S. C, Salem, Va., Newberry, Charleston, and Co- 
lumbia, S. C. This Seminary has made a large and lasting contribution 
to the life and growth of the Lutheran Church, especially so in the South- 
land. 

Among those who headed this school were: Rev. J. G. Schwartz, 
Dr. E. L. Hazelius, Rev. William Berly, Dr. Lewis Eichelberger, Dr. J. A. 



Rev. Andrew George Voigt, 
D.D., LL.D. 

Dean Lutheran Theological 
Southern Seminary 

Brown, Dr. J. P. Smeltzer, Dr. A. R. Rude, Dr. S. A. Repass, Dr. A. G. 
Voigt, Dr. J. A. Morehead, Dr. M. G. G. Scherer, Dr. C. A. Freed, Dr. C, 
K. Bell, Dr. E. C. Cooper, and now Dr. J. L. Yost. Dr. M. L. Stirewalt 
and Dr. J. B. Moose each served as Dean for a few years. Others who 
served on the faculty deserve mention here also, but lack of space forbids. 

Dr. A. G. Voigt was Professor of Systematic Theology in this school 
for a total of forty-one years, and was Dean for thirty of those years. He 
was a thorough scholar, a master teacher, and withal a man of God. He 
was a loyal member of the North Carolina Synod from 1898 to the time of 
his death, January 2, 1933. He still lives in the lives of the men whom 
he trained in this School of the Prophets for soul saving service. 

J. L. M. 



History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 115 

and manufacture the most baneful sects with it! O how necessary, 
useful and consolatory would it not be, if we were able to erect a long 
wished for institution, in which catechists could be trained who would 
be capable and willing to teach a school during the week, and to deliver 
a discourse (vertrag) on the Lord's day. It would not be necessary 
to torment such subjects many years with foreign languages; it would 
be sufficient if they possessed mother wit, a compendious knowledge 
and experience of the marrow and sap of theology, could write a toler- 
able hand, understand their vernacular (German) and the English 
tongues, and the elements of Latin. They should also possess a robust 
bodily constitution, able to endure every kind of food and weather, 
and especially have a heart that sincerely loves Jesus and His lambs." 

In writing history many records are not available and many of 
the elements which enter into success or failure have been deliberately 
omitted. One good woman could never forget that an estimable and 
successful pastor wiped his brow with a red bandana handkerchief while 
delivering a baccalaureate sermon. On such things does the reputation of 
an institution rise or wane. The following pages are not satisfactory to 
the writer and will be found unsatisfactory by many. The paucity of 
records does not permit a complete story and many factors entering 
into the picture cannot be accurately portrayed. 

The primary aim of Christian education in the Lutheran Church 
has been to supply the church with trained leaders, particularly with 
pastors thoroughly furnished to every good work. But our church has 
never lost sight of civilization's need of general culture and learning 
for the preservation of a proper social order which is at its best only 
when the elements of a Christian faith and ethic are included in edu- 
cation. Therefore Christian education is essential to the life of the 
church. 

It seems evident that the extension of catechization to selected 
individuals to prepare them^ to assist the pastors was practically contempo- 
raneous with the arrival of the first pastors and the teacher, John Arndt, 
who became a pastor. This was first done by individual pastors. In 
1817 there appears a report of the "Tennessee Academy" under the care 
of the Rev. Philip Henkel and Joseph E. Bell, teaching Greek, Hebrew, 
and English. It appealed to the North Carolina Synod for financial 
support. Evidence of divided counsel is present and aid was withheld 
until there was assurance that the "seminary's" constitution met Synod's 
approval. The break of 1820 came and nothing further is heard of the 
school. Individual pastors continued to train men who were licensed 
to teach catechumens, to exhort, to perform emergency baptisms accord- 
ing to each man's attainment of education. Some went through long 
apprenticeship before their literary and theological education was judged 
adequate for ordination. Annual examination of these candidates for 
pastoral office was held by the Ministerium or, in the interim, by 
two or more pastors, and they were solemnly set apart for service with 
written license indicating their permissible duties and their obligations. 



116 History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 




Col. Geo. F. McAllister 
Principal Mount Pleasant Collegiate Institute 
Mount Pleasant, North Carolina 




Main Building, North Carolina College and Later 
Mount Pleasant Collegiate Institute 

Mount Pleasant, N. C. 



History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 117 

A little later when seminaries had been established some were trained 
in them. The North Carolina Synod appointed trustees for the Gettys- 
burg Seminary. Definite courses of study were prescribed for those who 
studied on the field, and examinations were not easy. 

By way of provision for the laity there was a resolution in 1812 
to regulate "Schools for Orphans" which evidently included others than 
orphans and indigent children since those who could afford it were to 
pay tuition. All trustees of these schools were required to be members of 
the church in good standing. Teachers were subject to the same require- 
ment and to approval by the pastors. 

At various times there were private schools, academies and 
parochial schools. Interesting as it would be to name and locate 
them, incomplete records make a list impossible. These schools were 
the expression of the strong desire of the people to instruct their 
children in the faith and to develop a strong Christian culture which 
would enable them to maintain a Christian society and advance the 
Kingdom of God. 

The minutes of 1828 record the organization of a Missionary Society 
which in 1834 became the Missionary and Education Society which for 
many years contributed to the support of beneficiary students for the 
Gospel ministry. In 1835 there was considered the Manual Labor Plan 
by which students could earn while they learned but the committee 
appointed reported that it was impracticable. In 1836 a proposal was 
received from the South Carolina Synod that the North Carolina Synod 
join in support of a theological seminary at Lexington, S. C, and have 
representation on the Board of Trustees in proportion to the financial 
support given. After some negotiation this support was given and 
continued until the establishment of the school at Mt. Pleasant, N. C. 
Two years after this arrangement was made a classical department was 
added to this school. This school taught Greek, Hebrew, Evidences of 
Christianity, Natural and Revealed Theology, Church History, Pastoral 
Theology, Church Government and Homiletics. When a school was 
established at Salem, Virginia, students from North Carolina enrolled, 
ten being recorded in 1851. 

Throughout these years there was a longing for an educational 
institution within the state that more of the youth of the church could 
attend and to prevent loss of pastors by drainage. The Rev. Joseph 
A. Linn, president, in his report to Synod in 1852 says: "We have but 
one subject which we would recommend to your wisdom and discretion, 
one which we conceive of vital importance to the interests of our church 
in North Carolina. ***BeIieving, with many others, that the resources 
necessary to the establishment of a High School of a Collegiate charac- 
ter, are amply sufficient, and adding to this the general wish of our 
Laity, and their expressed willingness to support such an institution, 
the time, we believe, has come when we should nobly act on this sub- 
ject." At a special session of Synod meeting at Concord, N. C, July 21, 



118 History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 

1852 it was resolved to plant Western Carolina Male Academy at Mt. 
Pleasant, N. C. A contract was let for a three-story building seventy- 
five by forty feet in size. The Rev. William Gerhardt accepted the 
call to be president and first professor. He was inaugurated May 24, 
1853. In 1859 a charter was secured converting the Academy into 
North Carolina College. The first Board of Trustees was composed of 
pastors William Artz, Daniel I. Dreher, G. D. Bernheim, John S. Heilig, 
Levi C. Groceclose, Jacob Crim, B. C. Hall, Joseph A. Linn and Samuel 
Rothrock, laymen Messrs. C. Melchor, esq.. Col. John Shimpoch, Dr. Paul 
A Seaford, A. Brown, esq., John A. Miller, esq., Ludwig Summers, P. N. 
Heilig, Mathias Barrier and Daniel Barrier. 

Two years later the War Between the States interrupted the work. 
It was resumed in 1867. The endowment had been invested in Con- 
federate and state bonds and was lost but another endowment was 
raised. In 1871 the first class was graduated. During the next twenty- 
nine years sixty-six degrees were granted to men, most of whom entered 
the learned professions. At least twenty-eight of these became Lutheran 
pastors. Hundreds of others had their horizons broadened and their 
usefulness enlarged by the culture brought into their lives through this 
school. 

After 1900 the school, under the care of the Rev. H. A. McCul- 
lough and Prof. G. F. McAllister, became a junior college under the 
name of Mt. Pleasant Collegiate Institute. It continued under the fos- 
tering care of the North Carolina Synod and pursued the same aims 
as fomerly, continuing to supply candidates for the ministry. Pastor 
McCullough returned to full time pastoral service and soon after Prof. 
McAllister became wholly responsible for administration. A modified 
form of military training was introduced. Prof McAllister was highly 
acceptable as a leader and found warm friends of the school to tide 
over emergencies, but the problem of adequate equipment and income 
was constant. 

Upon the merger of the North Carolina and Tennessee Synods edu- 
cational agencies were merged and all the schools came under one 
board. The schools at Mt. Pleasant were under the special care of a 
committee of that Board and Lenoir College under another committee. 
Several efforts were made to provide for the needs of the schools at Mt. 
Pleasant, but were only partially successful. It was not possible to 
rally enough support to meet the situation as it was affected by chang- 
ing conditions. The rapid development of public education produced 
competition which made maintenance of church supported schools very 
difficult. In 1931 Mt. Pleasant Collegiate Institute was leased to Prof. 
McAllister on reasonable terms. Four years later he surrendered 
his lease and the school closed. For the times in which the schools 
at Mt. Pleasant operated considerable sums of money were expended 
upon them. The impetus they gave to the life of the church, the ser- 
vice rendered to society and the church by the men and women coming 
under their influence has brought to state and church values far in 
excess of all that was spent. 



History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 119 

presidents of north carolina college 

Rev. W. Gerhardt, D.D 1855-1858 

Rev. D. H. Bittle, D.D 1859-1861 

Rev. L. A. Bikle, D.D 1866-1867 

Rev. C. F. Bansemer 1867-1868 

Rev. L. A. Bikle, D. D 1868-1874 

Rev. J. B. Davis, D.D 1875-1877 

Rev. L. A. Bikle, D.D 1878-1881 

Rev. G. H. Bernheim, D.D 1882-1883 

Rev. G. F. Schaeffer, D.D 1883-1887 

Rev. J. G. Schaidt, D.D 1887-1889 

Rev. J. D. Shirey, D.D 1889-1896 

Rev. M. G. G. Scherer, D.D 1896-1899 

Prof. Edgar Bowers (Acting President) 1899-1900 

Rev. W. A. Lutz 1900-1902 

PRESIDENTS OF COLLEGIATE INSTITUTE 

Col. George F. McAllister, Ped. D 1902-1935 

Rev. L. E. Busby, D.D., Co-Principal 1902-1903 

Rev. H. A. McCullough, D.D., Co-Principal 1903-1907 

Mont Amoena Seminary. As early as 1858 the President of the 
North Carolina Synod mentioned the need of a school for young women. 
The first effort resulted in the establishment of such a school, under 
private control, with Mrs. D. F. Bittle, Principal. In 1868 the Rev. G. D. 
Bernheim, who was then in control of the undertaking, offered to trans- 
fer the school to the Synod on favorable terms; and in 1869 the transfer 
was effected, and a Board of Trustees elected. This school, first known as 
Mount Pleasant Female Seminary and later as Mont Amoena Seminary, 
continued to prosper for more than half a century. Its contribution to the 
culture of its time cannot be estimated adequately. Homes were the 
better for lessons learned there; it sent forth leaders for the work of 
Lutheran and other churches; it trained women who became the wives 
and co-laborers of pastors. When the public schools were poorly equip- 
ped, and terms were too short for adequate preparation of the pupils, 
it supplemented their work. It was an island of culture in the difficult 
years following the War Between the States. Finally the public schools 
provided an education in keeping with the desires of Mont Amoena's 
patrons, and high schools took over its work. Its doors were closed in 
1927. During its period of service, the following persons served as 
Principals or Presidents of the Institution: 

Mrs. D. H. Bittle 1859-1868 

Rev. G. D. Bernheim 1868-1870 

Rev. D. 1. Drehr 1870-1871 

Prof. W. A. Barrier 1871-1872 

Mrs.. W. E. (Nee Ribble) Hubbart 1872-1874 

Prof. L. H. Rothrock 1876-1882 

Rev. G. F. Shaeffer 1882-1883 

Rev. J. Adolphus Linn 1885-1891 



120 History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 





Mont Amoena Seminary 

Mount Pleasant, North Carolina 

Burned November 30, 1911 




Mont Amoena Seminary 

Mount Pleasant, N. C. 



History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 121 

Rev. C. L. T. Fisher 1892-1897 

(School named Mont Amoena in 1892) 

Rev. H. N. Miller 1897-1902 

Rev. J. H. C. Fisher 1902-1914 

Rev. R. a. Goodman 1914-1921 

Rev. J. H. C. Fisher 1921-1927 

Prof. H. A. Fisher 1921-1923 V.P. 

At Dallas, North Carolina, on territory of the Tennessee Synod, 
the Rev. M. L. Little established a high school. After his death other 
leadership was found for the school. It developed into Gaston College 
for Girls and Young Women. For many years Prof. S. A. Wolf was 
principal. Free tuition was offered to one pupil from each congregation 
of the Synod. As the public schools improved schools of this nature 
were unable to maintain themselves. 

The Tennessee Synod did not neglect education. From its begin- 
ning in 1820 it strove for an educated ministry. Evidence of the stan- 
dard desired is found in the early requirement that the ability to trans- 
late the New Testament from the Greek into the vernacular was re- 
quisite for ordination. However, this standard could not be maintained. 
When a course of training for pastors was published it contained: 
"Kerne's Introduction, Hutter's Compend, Book of Concord, Krauth's 
Conservative Reformation, Knapp's Christian Theology, Mann's Schmidt's 
Christian Ethics, Kurtz's Sacred History, Kurtz's Church History, Ripley's 
Sacred Rhetoric, Vinet's Homiletics, Vinet's Pastoral Theology, Exegesis, 
Catechetics, Liturgies and Ecclesiastical Polity. These courses were 
to be read under the supervision of one or more pastors with examina- 
tion by the same. Some of the candidates attended established semi- 
naries. Parochial schools were established. Dr. Yoder says: "The 
parochial school came from the fatherland only with the Lutheran 
Church. A congregation without its school was hardly to be thought of 
even when there was no pastor, the congregation must have its teacher." 

As indicated in a former paragraph, Sunday Schools were 
not generally introduced until after the War Between the States. 
Catechizing was stressed and thorough preparation of the candidates 
for confirmation insisted upon. The Henkei Printing Company pub- 
lished annotated editions of Luther's Smaller Catechism and some pas- 
tors published short catechisms. When Henkel's translation of the Book 
of Concord appeared it was published at popular prices and went into 
many homes. Preaching was usually of a doctrinal character and was 
as frequent as the limited number of men available made possible. 
Here also, as in the North Carolina Synod, one sermon immediately 
followed another when groups could be gathered to hear. What has 
been said of the use of the printed word is particularly applicable. 
However there was no church school serving any considerable portion 
of the Synod until after the War Between the States. 



122 



History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 



In 1877 Mr. R. A. Yoder, the Synod's first beneficiary student, 
was graduated from North Carolina College. His struggle for a col- 
lege degree had been long and strenuous, having led him to Illinois 
where he had brothers, but had finally brought him back to Mt. Pleasant. 
The Rev. Dr. P. C. Henkel and the Rev. John M. Smith, serving pastorates 
in and near Conover, N. C, had for some time desired a high school 
at Conover. Mr. Yoder went to Conover after graduation and taught a 
"subscription" school and then a term of public school. At the same 
time he began the study of theology under pastors Henkel and Smith. 

In 1878 Conover High School was organized under direction of the 
local pastors and Mr. Yoder was elected principal. The Tennessee Synod 
appointed a committee to investigate the advisability of making this 
school a synodical enterprize. The committee made a favorable report 
and another committee was appointed to endeavor to reach an agree- 
ment with the local sponsors. There is no record of a report by this 
committee. R. A. Yoder was ordained in 1879 and in 1883 resigned as 
principal to attend the seminary in Philadelphia. Dr. P. C. Henkel suc- 
ceeded him and the Rev. J. C. Moser succeeded him. The high school 
was chartered as a college in 1880. The Tennessee Synod received the 
college under its fostering care with the privilege of nominating trustees 
to fill any vacancies occurring on the Board. The college agreed to have 




"Old Main". Lenoir College 
Hickory, North Carolina 



History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 123 

the president and board of trustees make annual report to Synod. In 
1888 the Rev. J. C. Moser returned to full time pastoral work in Hickory, 
N. C, and was succeeded by the Rev. R. A. Yoder. 

Since 1875 there had been a desire on the part of some members of 
Synod to accept property offered for school use by Col. Walter W. Lenoir. 
This property lay across the Eastern boundary line of Hickory. Col Le- 
noir wished a school established to give young people an opportunity to 
get an education. A little more than fifty years ago many rural public 
schools in North Carolina had not more than a three months session in the 
year. In 1890 Mr. J. G. Hall, trustee of this property under the terms of 
Col. Lenoir's will, renewed the offer to the Tennessee Synod and interested 
local pastors in the proposition. Pastors J. C. Moser, R. A. Yoder, W. 
P. Cline and A. L. Crouse agreed to a joint acceptance of the offer with- 
out the approval of Synod. With support from a few of their laymen 
these four men pledged all their earthly possessions to comply with 
the terms of the will and dedicated their lives to the establishment of 
a college. They were in advance of their times in both Concordia and 
Lenoir Colleges in that they provided co-education when most other 
schools frowned upon it. In both of these schools Synod provided a 
professor of theology to prepare pastors for service. Notes aggregating 
$10,000 were given for deposit in the First National Bank and a deed was 
recorded to pastors J. C. Moser, R. A. Yoder, W. P. Cline and A. L. Crouse 
and Mr. J. G. Hall as trustees for a school to prepare students for at 
least the freshman year in a standard college or university, Mr. Hall 
to be a life member of the Board of Trustees and to have the privilege of 
nominating annually an indigent young man for free tuition. 

A majority of the Board of Trustees of Concordia College invited 
the Missouri Synod to operate that school. They accepted the invitation 
and operated a school in Conover for some years. 

The new college was named Lenoir College. The Rev. R. A. Yoder 
was elected president. In 1891 it opened its doors in a frame building 
which had been used as an academy. A substantial brick building, 
known later as Old Main, was built. 

The pastors who founded the college were at one with Col. Lenoir in 
wishing to provide a sound education within reach of the young people 
ot that time. They were not primarily interested in founding an 
educational institution. They considered teaching and learning as the 
doorway to a richer and fuller life and greater usefulness. Each had 
struggled to secure an education under adverse conditions and they 
had acquired sufficient education to put them in the forefront of the 
circles in which they moved and served. They were dedicated to pass- 
ing on to others what they had acquired. Dr. Moser was absorbed in 
his work as pastor and taught very little. The Rev. Crouse soon returned 
to pastoral service. Pastors Yoder and Cline remained with the school 
ten years, resigning in 1901. 

In 1901 the Rev. R L. Fritz, professor in Elizabeth College and 
formerly professor in Lenoir College, accepted a call to the presidency. 



124 History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 




Daniel Efird Rhyne Administration Building 

Lenoir Rhyne College 
Hickory, North Carolina 




Gaston Female College 
Dallas, North Carolina 



History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 125 

The educational program was rapidly changing throughout America 
but particularly in North Carolina. In 1900 Charles B. Aycock became 
governor of the State and began to redeem his campaign pledge to 
improve the public schools. With great courage and boldness Presi- 
dent Fritz exerted himself to keep pace with the general educational 
progress. Marked advances were made in equipment and curriculum. 
Oakview Dormitory for girls, Highland Hall for boys and the Yoder 
Science Building were built and $50,000 for endowment was raised. 
Some of the lots near the campus which had been sold in the needy 
days of the beginning returned to college ownership. The college was 
given an A grade rating by the State Board of Education. Dr. Fritz 
resigned the presidency in 1919 but continued as professor. He and 
Mrs. Rosa E. Yoder, widow of the Rev. R. A. Yoder, canvassed success- 
fully for an endowment of $300,000. Presidents succeeded him as fol- 
lows: The Rev. Dr. John C. Peery, 1920-1925; the Rev. Dr. P. E. Monroe, 
acting president, 1925-1926; the Rev. Dr. H. Brent Schaeffer, 1926-1934; 
the Rev. Dr. P. E. Monroe, 1934-1949; the Rev. Dr. Voigt R. Cromer, 1949. 

When the two Synods within the state were merged a Board of 
Trustees was elected to have the care of all the educational institutions 
formerly belonging to both Synods. North Carolina College, operated as 
Mt. Pleasant Collegiate Institute, was listed as having property valued 
at $65,000 with endowment of $5,000 plus $15,000 in subscriptions secured 
by notes. At that time it was a junior college of recognized standing. 

Mont Amoena Female Seminary reported property valued at $66,000 
with a fund of $4,000 on hand and a debt of $7,000. 

Lenoir College reported property valued at $230,000 with an 
endowment totaling $338,000 and a debt of $30,000. The college was 
ranked class A by the State Board of Education. 

Mr. Daniel E. Rhyne had given $100,000 to Lenoir College in 
1919 as a part of the $300,000 campaign. In 1922 he proposed a gift 
of $300,000 if the Synod would raise a like sum. His offer was accepted. 
In appreciation of Mr. Rhyne's benefactions it was voted to name the 
school Daniel Rhyne College. At his request, however, the name was 
changed in 1923 to Lenoir Rhyne College. The Rhyne offer of $300,000 
resulted in a campaign for a goal of $850,000— $600,000 to be for the 
endowment and $250,000 for buildings. The appeal was only partially 
successful. 

The financial collapse of 1929 and the ensuing depression made 
fund raising difficult. For several years the endowment of the college 
failed to yield adequate returns. Sharply curtailed income made the 
financial condition of the school precarious. With the return of better 
business conditions in the later thirties, and under the careful manage- 
ment of President Monroe, the college gained a firmer financial footing 
and was able to meet its obligations in full. It is now free of debt 
and has not incurred an operating deficit for some years. 



126 History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 

When the United Lutheran Church in America put on its Christian 
Higher Education Year Appeal in 1950 for $6,000,000 to aid its educa- 
tional institutions, the North Carolina Synod was in the forefront with 
its response, raising more than $500,000 for Lenoir Rhyne College plus 
an additional amount for the Southern Seminary. This response is a 
testimony to the favor in which the college is held by the members 
of the North Carolina Synod. 

At present the Lenoir Rhyne campus consists of forty-two acres 
lying within the city of Hickory. The plant includes eleven major 
buildings. In addition to those already named there are the Cline Gym- 
nasium, 1924; Daniel Efird Rhyne Administration Building erected in 
1928 to replace Old Main which was destroyed by fire January 6, 1927; 
Mauney Hall (dormitory for women), 1928; College Refectory, 1928; 
Schaeffer Hall (dormitory for women), 1941; Carl Augustus Rudisill 
Library, 1943; Dr. Robert Lindsay Fritz Hall (dormitory for men), 1950; 
St. Andrew's Church and John D. Mauney Education Building, owned 
by St. Andrew's Congregation, the Synod and the College, 1951. A 
residence for the president was completed in 1951 and nine other resi- 
dences are owned by the college. The former St. Andrew's Church build- 
ing was purchased and is used as an assembly building. Four tem- 
porary buildings on the campus contain twelve apartments for married 
students. The stadium on the Athletic Field seats 6,000. The library 
contains 35,350 volumes and subscribes to eleven daily newspapers and 
274 periodicals. 

Funds are accumulating for several new buildings and the amount 
on hand now totals $535,211. The endowment is $752,097. Including 
St. Andrew's Church and Education Building, total assets are $3,000,000. 
Annual operating expenses have exceeded $500,000 for several years. 

The past several years the enrollment for the regular session has 
exceeded 750 students with the two sessions of Summer School enrolling 
from 300 to 450. Recent increases in the number of applicants have 
made it impossible to accept all who seek admission. From 1891-1952 
the college has conferred 2,758 degrees and about 2,200 others have 
been enrolled who were not graduated. A high percentage of the 
graduates have entered the Gospel Ministry and other full time church 
work. 

Lenoir Rhyne grants A. B. and B. S. degrees and is fully accredited 
by the Southern Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools. In 
addition to its sound academic program, the college has made an 
enviable record in such extra-curricular activities as dramatics, forensics, 
choir, band and athletics. 

Through her educational programs and institutions the North 
Carolina Synod has been zealous for the truth which makes men free, 
insisting that Christ must be central and paramount in education. By 
continuing in this conviction she will go on training Christian leaders 
for tomorrow and furnishing that leaven which is indispensable to 
individual salvation and a Christian social order in a world of many 
hostile forces. 



History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 127 



AUXILIARY 
ORGANIZATIONS 



History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 129 

I. WOMEN'S MISSIONARY SOCIETY 

1. The First Twenty Years 

"With joy and thanksgiving we are met together — to review the 
labors of the past year — the first of our existence as a Synodical Society." 
With these words Mrs. J. S. Fisher, of Concord, first President of the 
Woman's Home and Foreign Missionary Society of the North Carolina 
Lutheran Synod, began her report at the first annual convention of the 
organization in Concord, April 29, 1886. "When our missionary, Rev. 
W. P. Swartz, organized the Executive Committee on the 24th of April, 
1885," she continued, "there were six auxiliary societies within the bounds 
of this Synod." 

By April, 1886, the number had increased to fourteen: St. Luke's, 
Bear Poplar; St. Mark's, Charlotte; St. Paul's, Wilmington; St. Enoch, 
Enochville; Lutheran Chapel, China Grove; Holy Trinity, Mt. Pleasant; 
Union, Salisbury; Grace, Salisbury; Bethel, Franklin; St. James, Concord; 
Trinity, Concord; Prosperity, Concord; St. John's, Cabarrus; and Center 
Grove, Kannapolis. 

Twenty-four delegates were present for that historic convention, 
representing three hundred twenty-five members, whose contributions for 
that first year amounted to $275.00. The Wilmington Society had sent 
a box to the "Guntoor" Mission in India, by Missionary Swartz — our first 
box work! The non-designated funds were divided equally between 
Home and Foreign Missions. A Constitution and By-Laws were adopted, 
the latter providing for life memberships at ten dollars, and an Order 
of Business for a meeting. Subscribers to the Missionary Journal number- 
ed more than fifty. Officers elected were: President, Mrs. J. S. Fisher; 
vice-presidents, Mrs. J. S. Heilig, Mrs. J. B. Davis, Mrs. J. D. Shirey, 
Mrs. R. A. Brown, Mrs. A. M. Brown; corresponding secretary. Miss Julia 
Shirey; recording secretary. Miss Lillian Slough; treasurer, Mrs. John 
A. Cline. 

Concerning reports given by representatives of the societies, Mrs. 
Fisher declared, "These reports are full of interest. Thank God, North 
Carolina has already a goodly number of Lutheran women, ready, will- 
ing, even anxious, to work for the promulgation of the blessed Gospel." 

The minutes of this historic meeting were printed along with the 
1886 Minutes of Synod. The next year, however, much to the chagrin of 
the ladies, Synod failed to publish their minutes, and devoted only one 
page to an "Abstract of the Proceedings of the Women." The record for 
that year was preserved in manuscript form. The women voted to print 
the minutes of the third annual convention at their own expense, and 
have done so ever since. 

Growing pains were evident during the first twenty years of the 
Woman's Home and Foreign Missionary Society. In the corresponding 
secretary's report of the fifth convention we read, "We have among 



130 History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 

us some weak and struggling societies that have not come up to their 
opportunity and duty, and we might pertinently ask, of how many could 
it be said, 'She hath done what she could'? Taking matters as a whole, 
there were few disagreements, and the minutes of the eighth convention 
closed with the words, "Thus ended a profitable and harmonizing 
meeting." 

In 1889 a constitution was adopted and printed with the minutes 
of that year. It was agreed at the fourth convention to change the time 
of the annual meeting to August so as not to conflict with the meeting 
of Synod in April. At first, seven women constituted a quorum at the 
annual convention! This number was later increased to thirteen. In the 
early years, each society was allowed two delegates. The nominating 
Committee offered two names for each office. Presidents of the "Con- 
ferential Conventions" made oral reports at the annual meeting, as well 
as a delegate from each society. By 1905, a series of programs was 
furnished by the state organization. 

An early attempt was made to organize the societies into Northern 
and Southern Conferential Conventions. The names of Mrs. G. H. Cox, 
Mrs. J. L. Morgan, and Misses Jennie Cook, Mattie Miller, and Laura 
Efird — women prominent in various capacities of the state organization 
— appear as chairmen of the organizing committees. While the Southern 
Conference began having semi-annual meetings as early as 1891, the 
attempts to weld the Northern societies into a union met with repeated 
failure. 

Children's Missionary Societies were in existence as early as 1886. 
Eleven years later with Miss Ella Belle Shirey as first children's secretary, 
it was decided that the Children's Bands should endeavor to raise $100 
annually as their portion of the Foreign Mission Fund, and that this 
amount should be used toward the support of a native Japanese worker, 
to be known as the "Children's Helper". 

The Young People came into prominence in 1888, with a group of 
Young Women reported organized at Mont Amoena Seminary in Mt. 
Pleasant. In 1902, the Girls' Guild of Charlotte assumed support of a 
teacher in Japan. 

During the first two decades, we note the evidences of depart- 
mental work in the society. First to be mentioned, in 1888, was the 
Week of Prayer observance, which was set at that time for the last 
week in October. Twenty years later, however, the time was changed 
to the first full week in Lent. Thank Offering envelopes were ordered 
printed and distributed in connection with the observance. Delegates 
at these first conventions were encouraged to read periodicals and tracts, 
such as "Miss Prescott's Mite Box"; later, "The Gist of Japan", by Dr. 
R. B. Peery. 

In 1888, the use of the Mite Box was encouraged, as well as a 
special birthday offering. Five years later this recommendation appears 
in the minutes: "That we ask ministers' wives of this Synod to give 
the marriage fees received on the date nearest Christmas to the Winston 



History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 131 

Mission." One dollar given by a lady or gentleman entitled the donor to 
an honorary membership for one year. This ruling, made in 1889, lasted 
for sixty years. The expenses of the annual convention were defrayed 
by the payment of five cents per menber per year. This was the probable 
forerunner of the Synodical fee. 

For the first five years, all undesignated funds were equally 
divided between Home and Foreign Missions and sent to the Board of 
Missions of the United Synod, South. Beginning in 1892, it became the 
policy of the Woman's Home and Foreign Mission Society to appropriate 
$700 annually to the board to be divided between Home and Foreign 
Missions. As faith and funds multiplied, and interest became keener in 
North Carolina, all receipts over this amount were remitted to the North 
Carolina Synod for mission points in the state. Mrs. Wertz, in her report 
of 1900, declared that the women were still without a project of their 
own, and the only thing they had to show for their prayers and gifts 
was the memorial window in Augsburg Church, Winston-Salem. Burl- 
ington soon became the "Women's Special". 

This growing interest in Home Missions did not exclude work in 
the foreign field. In 1892, the Board of the United Synod, South, had 
sent out Dr. J. A. B. Scherer and Dr. R. B. Peery to Japan. They were 
followed by Rev. C. L. Brown, Rev. C. K. Lippard, and Rev. A. J. Stirewalt, 
in successive years. In 1904, originated the Forward Movement among 
the members of the Southern Women's Synodical Societies. By their 
twentieth anniversary, the North Carolina women had raised $1,000, half 
of which went to Japan and the other half to N. C. Missions. 

In 1903, an attempt was made by the North Carolina women to 
cooperate with the other Women's Synodical groups in the South in form- 
ing a General Society of the United Synod, South; but they received no 
encouragement in this venture from the N. C. Synod. 

Before the turn of the century, a historian was included among 
the officers, and in 1905, Mrs. M. C. Bowman had written a comprehensive 
history of the society's first twenty years, which was printed with the 
minutes of that year. 

During the first twenty years of the Society's existence, we notice 
gains in every direction. Though, in the early days, it was deplored 
that only two fifths of the congregations in the Synod could boast of 
missionary circles, still the number of societies, during this period, 
increased from 6 to 44, the membership from 160 to 997, the contributions 
from $275 to $2,635. 



2. 1905 To The Merger 

Five presidents conducted the affairs of the Woman's Home and 
Foreign Missionary Society from 1905 until the merger. 

At the beginning of this period, a hope of long duration became 
a reality. There was organized at Dallas, N. C, a Woman's Missionary 
Conference of the Southern Lutheran Church (in connection with the 



132 History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 

United Synod, South). Six delegates from the N. C. Society were elected to 
attend. Officers from other states, members of the Board of Missions 
of the United Synod, Editors of Tidings and the Women's page in the 
Visitor, were often in attendance at these conventions. It was recom- 
mended at one meeting that "some gentleman deliver a discourse on 
'Woman and the World's Evangelization'!" 

It was decided in 1914 that no officer, except the treasurer, could 
hold office more than two terms. In 1916, we find the Contingent fee 
of 25c per person mentioned. In this year the name Woman's Home 
and Foreign Missionary Society was shortened to Women's Missionary 
Society. Just before the merger, a constitution, suggested for societies 
by the United Synod, South, was adopted with changes. North Carolina 
was the first unit to have a field secretary; Miss Constance Cline was 
the first, followed by Mrs. Y. Von A. Riser, and Mrs. John M. Cook. The 
official family, at this time, consisted of a president, three vice-presidents, 
recording secretary, corresponding secretary, a president and treasurer of 
Young People's Work, a secretary-treasurer of Children' Work, archivist, 
field secretary, three department secretaries (Thank Offering, Mission 
Study, Life Membership), a literature committee, and conference organiz- 
ing committees. 

Gradually, departments were beginning to evolve. Mission study 
periods were worked into crowded convention schedules. A literature 
exhibit became an important attraction at conventions. Thank offerings 
were collected four times a year — a custom to which we reverted in 
1950. The Thank Offering, as well as the Life Membership Fund, was 
divided between Home and Foreign Missions. 

Finally, in 1911, the Northern Conference Convention was organized 
through the efforts of Mrs. George H. Cox; whereupon, the two conference 
presidents became members of the executive committee. 

The Young People, and Children's Bands were making their presence 
felt. Greatly instrumental in helping to organize the Young People, was 
Miss Laura Efird. Eventually, these two groups merged with the Luther 
League of the North Carolina Conference of the Tennessee Synod and 
became the North Carolina Luther League of today. 

Foreign Missions were perhaps the first love of the women from 
1905 to 1918. Reverend L. S. G. Miller went to Japan during this period, 
and by 1909 there were six missionaries in the field. In 1913, while Mrs. 
R. L. Patterson was president, the Women's and Young People's Societies 
of the United Synod, South, undertook the support of two women mis- 
sionaries. Miss Mary Lou Bowers, and Miss Martha Akard. In 1917, 
the board sent out Misses Annie and Maud Powlas. The $4,000 goal, 
pledged for the Women Missionaries' home in Japan, was well on the 
way to being realized. The society was asked to assume the entire 
support of kindergarten work at $600 a year. The Holland Memorial 
Scholarship Fund, $75 annually for a Japanese theological student, 
was established. 



History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 133 

In 1907, Dr. J. L. Morgan succeeded Rev. Edward Fulenwider as 
'•Home Missionary". Woman's Memorial Church at High Point, became 
a reality in 1909. It was the first church built by the Woman's Home 
and Foreign Missionary Society alone, except for the generous contri- 
butions of the local church and friends. In explaining how a committee 
of women had met previously with the executive committee of Synod 
to make these plans, Mrs. J. A. Linn, in her report of 1908, says, "It was 
decided to build at High Point — a brick church, to cost not less than 
$5,000, to be known as the 'Woman's Memorial Church'." A total amount 
of $4,130 was given for the High Point Church (now Emmanuel), by the 
women. 

The largest annual offering made by the women was given in 
1909, $4,515. This included the Children's and Young People's offerings. 
For the 25th anniversary celebration in 1910, for which Miss Constance 
Cline wrote a historical sketch, the delegates set a goal of $200 for each 
year of the society's life. They raised $4,182. 

The most important event directly affecting the Women's Mis- 
sinoary Society up to now, was the merging, in 1918, of three leading 
Lutheran bodies, at a historic meeting in New York City. At the same 
time, the Women's Missionary Societies of the three merged bodies met 
to form the Women's Missionary Society of the United Lutheran Church 
in America. Four delegates from North Carolina attended the first con- 
vention of the united society: Miss Constance Cline, Mrs. John M. Cook, 
Mrs. G. W. McClanahan, and Mrs. Y. Von A. Riser. 

Mrs. John M. Cook, president of the society in 1918, urged loyalty 
to the General Society. A recommendation of the convention was to 
"pledge cooperation in the general work of the Women's Missionary 
Society of the United Lutheran Church in America, and that all funds 
for the general work of the society be sent to its treasurer." The North 
Carolina women also approved the General Society's suggestion of dues 
of ten cents per member per month; and that all dues. Life Membership 
Funds, and regular Thank Offerings be given to the General Fund of 
the Women's Missionary Society of the United Lutheran Church in 
America. As for the Week of Prayer and its offering, Mrs. Cook recom- 
mended: "That this society urge the Executive Board of the Women's 
Missionary Society of the United Lutheran Church to recommend to all 
Synodical Societies the observance of the first week of Lent as a Week 
of Prayer and Self-Denial for Missions, and that each Synodical Society 
be privileged to designate the objects to which funds resulting therefrom 
be applied." Since then the North Carolina Society has continued to 
claim a part of this offering for Home Mission work in her own state. 



3. From The Merger To The Golden Jubilee 

Just three years after the merger of the general societies, there 
occurred a synodical merger within the bounds of the state. In line with 
this, the Women's Missionary Societies of the North Carolina and Ten- 
nessee Synods joined forces. 



134 History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 

The Women's Missionary Society of the Tennessee Synod was eight 
years old at this time, having been organized in 1913. Prior to 1908, 
however, societies in this area were meeting as individual units, com- 
posing their own programs, and dividing their offerings equally between 
Home and Foreign Missions. When the Tennessee Synod met at Holy 
Trinity, Hickory, in October, 1913, it was recommended that a Synodical 
Women's Society be organized, and a constitution was drawn up. 

The next month, during Thanksgiving week, the organizational 
meeting was held in St. Andrew's Church, Hickory. Twenty delegates 
were present, including two from South Carolina. In 1914, twenty-two 
societies were enrolled. The loyalties of the Tennessee Women's Mis- 
sionary Society were also to both Home and Foreign Missions. The 
Monroe and Statesville Churches were financially aided. Overseas 
interest was in the Japan Home for Women Missionaries, and by 1916 
the society was helping to support Misses Bowers and Akard. Week of 
Prayer was an important observance, and strides were being made in 
Thank Offering, Mission Study, and Life Memberships. Offerings for the 
year 1920 were $1,510. At the time of the merger of the two North 
Carolina units there were 35 societies. Mrs. R. L. Fritz of Hickory has 
written a detailed history of the Tennessee Synodical Society. 

In August, 1921, the Tennessee women met in the A. R. P. Church 
in Mooresville, while the North Carolina group met at St. Mark's. A 
ways and means committee had been appointed to supervise the merger 
and a constitution was adopted for the joint organization. Greetings 
were brought by Mrs. F. A. Bissinger, president of the North Carolina 
Society, and Mrs. A. P. Rudisill, of the Tennessee Synodical Society. 
Naturally, membership and offerings reached a new high, the following 
year. 

In 1922, the Eastern and Western Conferences appeared on the 
scene. In 1923, the conference presidents took over the duties of field 
secretary for the state, and that office was no longer needed. 

About the same time that the Tennessee and North Carolina 
women combined interests, the Children's Societies received a new 
name — that of the Light Brigade — and Mrs. Julia Hall was its first 
Superintendent. One session at the 1926 Convention was given over 
entirely to the Young Women. 

In 1924, the North Carolina Society entertained the national 
organization at St. John's Church in Salisbury. The Synodical Society 
was signally honored in 1928, when, at the Johnstown Biennial Convention, 
Mrs. John M. Cook was elected general treasurer. Nine years later she 
was made statistical secretary of the General Society. 

The number of department secretaries dropped from 22 in 1922 
to 6 in 1928! They were Thank Offering and Magazine, Mission Study 
and Literature, Life Membership and Annuity, West Indies and India 
Lace, Box Work, and Young Women (headed by Miss Clara Sullivan). 
By 1929 the Week of Prayer and Self-Denial, with its offerings, had 
become so important, that on Mrs. J. L. Morgan's recommendation, it 



History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 135 

was made a department. The following year the Patron and Protege 
Department was added. 

In 1922, a 50c Synodical Fee was requested. Through the years 
this fee, coming from each individual member of the society, has provided 
for the printing and mailing of literature, including the monthly pro- 
grams and Week of Prayer material; stationery; travel expenses of 
officers; expenses of speakers at the state conventions, and other 
miscellaneous items. 

In 1929, under the leadership of Mrs. J. F. Crigler, president, an 
important decision was made by the Women of North Carolina. They 
voted to assume the support of their first mxissionary, Miss Clara 
Sullivan, for one term of five years in the China field. Local societies 
made one or more pledges of $5 each to cover her support, which would 
amount to $1,000 annually. Another most unusual event took place 
six years later, when Dr. Gladys Morgan was commissioned as the first 
medical missionary from North Carolina. Her mother, Mrs. J. L. Morgan, 
representing the General Board (she was a board member at that time) 
presented her daughter for the commissioning! 

During these sixteen years an unbelievable amount of Home 
Mission work was done by the North Carolina Women's Missionary 
Society. Interest in mountain missions grew, as the General Society 
took for its Biennial Objective one term of work in Watauga county. North 
Carolina, and Konnarock, Virginia. Miss Cora Pearl Jeffcoat was com- 
missioned as parish worker in Watauga county in 1923 and later. Miss 
Amy Fisher, daughter of Mrs. J. H. C. Fisher, a former President, went to 
Boone as parish nurse. 

The Blowing Rock Church was erected by the North Carolina 
Women's Missionary Society in memory of Miss Constance Cline, and 
the pews in the Asheville Church are a memorial to Miss Ella Belle 
Shirey. The Synodical Society contributed to the Lippard Memorial 
Church in Hudson, in memory of Rev. and Mrs. C. O. Lippard. 

The Golden Jubilee of the Synodical Society was fittingly cele- 
brated in St. Mark's Church, Charlotte. Mrs. J. A. Moretz served as 
chairman of the anniversary committee and wrote the historical sketch 
that appears in the booklet. Much appreciation was due Mrs. Pearl 
Setzer Deal for writing and directing "Lighting the Cross for Fifty 
Years." The end of the first fifty years found the Women's Missionary 
Society of the North Carolina Synod with a total of 130 societies, 2,480 
active members, and gifts for that year totaling $11,803. 



4. 1936 To The Present 

The last fifteen years of our history have seen many changes, on 
the state and national level, and a greater advance in membership and 
gifts. Membership and offerings have more than tripled over the figure 
given for the previous period. 



136 History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 

Synod, in 1936, had set the boundaries of its four conferences; 
the Women's Society did likewise. 

Mrs. L. E. Blacl^welder announced in her report of 1938 that the 
Light Brigade had been placed under the jurisdiction of the Parish and 
Church school board of the ULCA and would be called the Children 
of the Church. 

In the early forties, three young North Carolina women emerged 
on the scene as full time Christian workers: Miriam Shirey and Elizabeth 
Cress graduated from the Baltimore Motherhouse, and Inez Seagle was 
commissioned as Missionary to the Jews in Baltimore. 

Mrs. G. W. McClanahan and Mrs. L. E. Blackwelder were responsible 
for the first convention bulletin, which has added so much to the delegates' 
understanding of convention business. 

The constitution was amended to provide for one delegate to the 
state convention for every forty members of a society, or major fraction 
thereof, and that each society could send one delegate, no matter how 
small in membership. 

In 1944 and 1945, during the presidency of Mrs. Aubrey Mauney, 
the Synodical Society underwent an experience that it hopes will be 
unique in its history. Infantile paralysis struck in 1944, and reduced 
the convention to a one-day meeting. Gasoline rationing the following 
year ruled out the annual meeting completely. Consequently, the 
celebration of the sixtieth anniversary of the society had to be postponed 
until the following year. Mrs. J. L. Morgan wrote up and presented 
a highly informative compendium, dealing principally with home mission 
work done by the organization in sixty years, but also giving milestones 
of the society's history. 

Changes in policy and procedure continued to be made. The 
United Program of the Women of the Church, approved by the National 
Society, was gaining in popularity. The society voted at the 1951 con- 
vention to cooperate with Lenoir Rhyne College in sending one or more 
young women to the triennial convention in 1952. 

A study has recently been made with a view to giving conferences 
more responsibilities and privileges. Since 1946 the conferences have 
been taking turns in entertaining the convention with Lenoir Rhyne 
College as host. One local change in the constitution, made in 1947, 
is the election of department secretaries by the administrative committee 
prior to the convention, instead of by the members at large. In 1951, 
Mrs. Aubrey Mauney was appointed historian of the Women's Missionary 
Society for the one hundred fiftieth anniversary celebration of Synod 
in 1953. 

Lutheran Woman's Work has been sent out to students in our 
Southern Seminary since 1947, and graduating students are usually made 
life members by women of their home churches. 

The North Carolina Society has been signally honored by the 
invitation to four North Carolina women to write the Week of Prayer 



History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 137 

programs. They were Mrs. John M. Cook, Mrs. J. F. Crigler, Sister 
Catherine Stirewalt and Miss Inez Seagle. 

Recently, the departments have been grouped in three divisions, 
according to the plan used by the General Society: educational, promotion 
and special gifts. 

In view of its increasing importance, North Carolina Missions was 
made a department in 1938. Mrs. E. C. Cooper was made its secretary, 
and it continued to grow in importance as a department. The mission 
in Durham was aided for some years, and, in 1941, Mrs. E. R. Trexler, 
as president, cooperating with representatives from other auxiliaries 
and the Durham congregation, helped to work out a method for liqui- 
dating the debt on this project. A total of $8,636 was given Dur- 
ham by the Women's Missionary Society. A pledge of $10,000 was 
made to the Chapel Hill project, with an individual contributing $2,000 
of this amount. Two hundred dollars were given for several years to 
the North Carolina Council of Churches toward the salary of a weekday 
religious education consultant. 

The Foreign Missions' picture showed equally as much progress 
over this period. One thousand dollars of the Winecoff bequest went 
to the Janice James School in Japan, in memory of Mrs. A. W. Winecoff, 
with the balance for the Morganton Mission. With the commissioning 
of Miss Virginia Aderholdt for Japan in 1936, and Miss Catherine Stire- 
walt for China in 1939, the list of N. C. missionaries grew. In 1940, 
over $400 was contributed to Lutheran World Action. Ruth Sigmon and 
Kathleen Ragan became two of the "Triennial Fifteen" missionaries in 
1946. During that year, the societies had been trying to give enough 
additional offerings to make it possbile to buy Clara Sullivan a station 
wagon for use in the China field. At the convention the women had 
brought in their donations, amounting to over $1,200, plus the Luther 
League's contribution of $75. Great was the excitement when Mrs. Clar- 
ence Whisnant of Hickory stepped to the platform and handed the presi- 
dent a check for $1,500 to cover the cost! It was decided that the money 
given by the women should consequently be used in the China Mission as 
the missionaries saw fit. In 1950, it was voted that the former Sullivan 
Fund be known by the names of missionaries it supports. Mrs. M. C. 
Yoder's report in 1947 states that Mrs. L. L. Minges' support of Virginia 
Aderholdt is the first instance in our Synodical Society of an individual 
supporting a woman missionary. At the same time Mrs. J. S. Efird 
gave $1,000 to be divided among four missionaries. Mention is made 
in 1948 of the Rev. and Mrs. Harold Deal's sailing for Japan. By 1951, 
five missionaries were being supported in whole or in part by the North 
Carolina Women's Missionary Society. Miss Elizabeth Huddle has been 
the most recent North Carolina girl to go to the foreign field, Japan, 
and she is supported by her congregation, Kimball Memorial, Kannapolis, 
and St. John's, Salisbury. 

In 1950, a revolutionary change was wrought in the policy of the 
ULCA Missionary Society, and our North Carolina organization followed 
suit. The constitution adopted in 1950 states that there will be no more 



138 History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 

dues, no more Sy nodical fees, but free-will offerings will take the place 
of these former "essentials". Eighty per cent of the free-will offering 
goes to the General Fund of the W. M. S. of the U. L. C. A.; 20% remains 
in the N. C. Administrative Fund (replacing the Synodical fee). Active 
members are defined as those attending meetings and making a contri- 
bution. 

Also, in 1950, the Patterson Memorial Fund, whose income is to 
be used solely by the Synodical Society, was established by the sons 
and daughters of I. Frank and Maria Patterson. 

In Mrs. M. C. Yoder's last year as president, the Maud and Annie 
Powlas Scholarship was set up, in honor of our first single women 
missionaries from North Carolina. This is an annual $200 scholarship 
at Lenoir Rhyne College for a worthy young woman planning to enter 
full time Christian service. 

During Mrs. E. R. Lineberger's administration, the women of three 
Southern Synods, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Georgia-Alabama, 
voted to raise $20,000 toward the erection of a Mission Hall at Lutheridge. 
North Carolina's proportionate part is $12,000, and on March 20, 1952, 
$8,642 had been paid. 

The past has been a glorious adventure, the present holds con- 
tinuous reward for those at work in the Lord's vineyard, and the future, 
God willing, may see a world at peace under the banner of the Prince 
of Peace. Thus our history of sixty-six fruitful years comes to an end, 
and we anticipate with high hope the Diamond Jubilee in 1960! 



Presidents of The N. C. Synodical Society 

1886-1888 Mrs. J. S. Fisher, Concord 

1888-1889 Mrs. W. G. Campbell, Concord 

1889-1891 Mrs. W. R. Brown, Heilig's Mills 

1891-1893 Miss Ella Belle Shirey, Mt. Pleasant 

1893-1894 Mrs. W. R. Brown, Organ Church 

1894-1896 Mrs. J. Q. Wertz, China Grove 

1896-1898 Mrs. J. H. C. Fisher, Mt. Pleasant 

1898-1900 Mrs. J. Q. Wertz, China Grove 

1900-1902 Miss Ella Belle Shirey, Bear Poplar 

1902-1904 Mrs. J. A. Linn, Mt. Pleasant 

1904-1906 Mrs. V. Y. Boozer, Salem 

1906-1912 Mrs. J. A. Linn, Rockwell 

1912-1915 Mrs. R. L. Patterson, Charlotte 

1915-1917 Miss Constance Cline, Concord 

1917-1919 Mrs. John M. Cook, Concord 

1919-1921 Mrs. F. A. Bissinger, Wilmington 

1921-1922 Mrs, John M. Cook, Concord 



History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 139 

1922-1925 Mrs. G. W. McClanahan, Gibsonville 

1925-1928 Mrs. J. L. Morgan, Salisbury 

1928-1931 Mrs. J. F. Crigler, Charlotte 

1931-1934 Mrs. J. A. Moretz, Hickory 

1934-1937 Mrs. G. W. McClanahan, Granite Quarry 

1937-1940 Mrs. L. E. Blackwelder, Mooresville 

1940-1943 Mrs. E. R. Trexler, China Grove 

1943-1946 Mrs. Aubrey Mauney, Kings Mountain 

1946-1949 Mrs. M. C. Yoder, Hickory 

1949-1952 Mrs. E. R. Lineberger, Lumberton 

1952- Mrs. Ray R. Fisher, Winston-Salem 

Treasurers of The N. C. Synodical Society 

1885-1888 Mrs. John A. Cline, Concord 

1888-1904 Mrs. P. N. Heilig, Salisbury 

1904-1905 Mrs. J. S. Brown, Salisbury 

1905-1920 Mrs. A. W. Winecoff, Salisbury 

1920-1927 Mrs. Fred Shepherd, Concord 

1927-1929 Mrs. John M. Cook, Concord 

1929-1934 Miss Jo Lipe, Landis 

1934-1939 Mrs. D. W. Moose, Concord 

1939-1942 Mrs. J. H. Weddington, Charlotte 

1942-1946 Miss Rosa Sox, Hickory 

1946-1947 Mrs. E. R. Lineberger, Spencer 

1947-1952 Mrs. Charles B. Gilbert, Catawba 

1952- Miss Aileen Aderholdt, Hickory 

Presidents and Treasurers of Tennessee 
Synodical Society 

presidents 

1913-1915 Mrs. W. J. Boger, Mt. Holly, N. C. 

1915-1916 Mrs. J. K. Efird, New Brookland, S. C. 

1916-1917 Mrs. E. H. Kohn, Mt. Holly, N. C. 

1917-1920 Mrs. W. J. Boger, Newton, N. C. 

1920-1921 Mrs. A. P. Rudisill, Dallas, N. C. 

TREASURERS 

1913-191.5 Mrs. W. H. Kimball 

1915-1916 Mrs. E. H. Kohn 

1916-1917 Mrs. J. D. Mauney 

1917-1921 Mrs. J. A. Costner 



140 History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 



Officer and Board Members From North Carolina Who 

Have Served and Are Serving The Women's Missionary 

Society of The United Lutheran Church in America 

Mrs. John M. Cook — Treasurer, 1928-1937; 
Statistical Secretary, 1937-1940 

Miss Constance Cline — Board Member, 1918-1919 

Mrs. John M. Cook — Board Member, 1919-1922 

Mrs. G. W. McClanahan — Board Member, 1922-1928 

Mrs. J. L. Morgan — Board Member, 1932-1940 

Mrs. L. E. Blackwelder — Board Member, 1940-1946 

Mrs. E. R. Trexler — Board Member, 1946-1952. 



Our North Carolina Women in Christian Service 
missionaries and parish v^orkers 

Maud Powlas, Japan 

Annie Powlas, Japan 

Marie Martens, Africa 

Cora Jeffcoat, N. C. Mountains 

Amy Fisher, Parish Nurse, Boone, N. C. 

Clara Sullivan, China 

Gladys Morgan-Happer, India 

Virginia Aderholdt, Japan 

Catherine Stirewalt, China 

Inez Seagle, Missionary to Jews, Baltimore, Maryland 

Ruth Sigmon, India 

Kathleen Ragan, China 

Elizabeth Huddle, Japan 



deaconesses 

Sister Pearl Lyerly Sister Miriam Shirey 

Sister Clara Smyre Sister Elizabeth Cress 

Sister Lucile Lyerly Sister Pearl Eckard 

Sister Nora McCombs Sister Sophie Moeller 



History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 141 

Offerings of Women's Missionary Society 
Of North Carolina 

(Not including Children's Offerings) 

1885-1930 $288,001.54 1942 20,685.03 

1931 14,963.35 1943 23,873.41 

1932 12,876.13 1944 27,599.15 

1933 10,335.72 1945 33,445.76 

1934 11,247.67 1946 43,620.91 

1935 11,803.07 1947 48,362.94 

1936 15,525.30 1948 49,719.29 

1937 13,452.89 1949 57.172.66 

1938 14,199.60 1950 56,885.84 

1939 15,541.56 1951 72,577.45 

1940 16,494.57 1952 72,856.38 

1941 20,633.73 $951,873.95 



II. THE CHILDREN'S ORGANIZATIONS 

The children's work in the Synod was, in the beginning, closely 
linked with that of the women. The minutes of Synod for the year 
1886 record the adoption of the resolution: "that we endorse the plans and 
constitutions used in the organization of Children's Societies and Women's 
Societies — that the money from the Children's Missionary Societies be 
sent to the treasurer of Synod marked Children's Fund for Foreign 
Missions and that the amounts thus collected be accredited upon the 
assessments of the various congregations for Foreign Missions." 

In harmony with this resolution, Mrs. J. D. Shirey, Bear Poplar, 
organized the first Children's Missionary Society at St. Luke's in 1886. 
A charter member of this society has in his possession one of the early 
certificates of membership which reads: "This is to certify that Bachman 
Miller of St. Luke's Sunday School has contributed 25c to the Children's 
Foreign Missionary Society of the Lutheran Church and is thereby 
constituted a member for one year." The second Children's Society was 
organized at Holy Trinity, Mt. Pleasant in 1889. 

At the convention of the Women's Missionary Society in 1893, the 
president, Miss Ella Belle Shirey, expressed concern over there being so 
few children's missionary bands and called for action. Accordingly, 
a constitution for the Children's Missionary Society of the North Carolina 
Synod was drafted and adopted at this convention. Article I reads: "The 

name of this society shall be the Children's Home and Foreign 

Missionary Society of the Lutheran Sunday School of " Each 

member was to pay 25c a year and the moneys were to be forwarded 
to the Board of Missions of the United Synod of the South. 



142 History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 

The first tabulated report of the Children's Societies was given in 
1895. The societies were: Grace, St. Luke's, St. Mark's (China Grove), 
Trinity, Salem, Holy Trinity, St. John's (Cabarrus), St. John's (Salisbury), 
Center Grove. Members, 265. Offerings, $93.17. 

The convention of 1897 was marked by several progressive steps. 
Miss Ella Belle Shirey was elected as secretary of the children's 
societies; her duty being to supervise the work of the children. The 
first public children's service, at which children participated, was held 
at this convention. It was voted that the children endeavor to raise 
$100 for the support of a native helper in Japan. This amount was 
raised with a surplus of $8.35. 

By 1898 some societies were holding regular monthly meetings; 
others were working through the Women's Society and Sunday School. In 
1899 societies were urged to subscribe to the Children's Missionary, which 
gave "a program and study in full for each monthly meeting." A few 
years later Tidings became the official paper. The amount of $50 was 
included in the children's budget for home missions in 1899. While it 
was not raised that first year, gradually funds exceeded the amount 
pledged for foreign missions and the children contributed to various 
home mission projects. There was a decided increase in offerings after 
1903, when specified dues were changed to the "payment of any sum 
annually or in monthly installments until paid". In 1906 there were 22 
societies contributing $374.93. The practice of giving a banner to the 
society having the largest per capita offering was begun in 1907. The 
following year mite boxes were used. Kept in the home for the children's 
offerings, they were collected once a year. In 1909 the children in North 
Carolina cooperated with the children of the United Synod in the support 
of the Reverend A. J. Stirewalt, a missionary in Japan, who became 
known as the Children's Missionary. By 1910 the Children's Society of 
the N. C. Synod was the largest in the United Synod, South. In her 1911 
report, the secretary states that nearly all societies had monthly meet- 
ings. Congregational public meetings given by the children were also 
becoming popular. 

The work of the children continued to grow. The birth of the 
Women's Missionary Society of the U.L.C.A. in 1918 had its impact upon 
the children's work in the Synod. Horizons widened and the children were 
given increased opportunities for service. 

Two factors gave a boost to children's work again in 1921: (1) The 
merger of the Missionary Societies of the Tennessee Synod, and the 
Synod of North Carolina. (2) The beginning of a new children's 
program under the name. Light Brigade. At the merger convention 
North Carolina reported 50 Light Brigades, 1,428 members, $2,517.96; 
Tennessee 13 Light Brigades, 464 members, $158.84. Mrs. Julia Hall was 
elected Synodical Superintendent of the Light Brigade at this convention. 

The Light Brigade programs were based upon the mission study 
books prepared by an interdenominational committee now known as 
the Friendship Press. Guides were prepared by Lutheran leaders for 



History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 143 

the three divisions, Little Lights, Lamplighters, and Torchbearers. 
The mite box became a thank offering box and even the Little Lights, 
who did not regularly attend meetings, were given thank offering boxes 
in the shape of a candle. There were regular monthly dues. 

Missionaries supported by the Light Brigade were: Miss Annie 
Powlas, Japan; Miss Christina Erickson, India; Miss Mary Bauer, Africa, 
and Miss Cora Pearl Jeffcoat, Watauga. Some of the other projects 
were: the milk fund, Puerto Rico, and the Queen Louise Home, Virgin 
Islands. 

By 1922 the Light Brigade had taken on definite form. There 
was a 12-point efficiency standard. Some of the points were: an increase 
in membership, at least 12 meetings a year, a public thank offering 
program, a life membership, and subscription to Lutheran Boys and Girls. 
In 1923, four of the 92 Brigades in North Carolina reached the 12 points 
while 15 others made the honor roll with 10 points. Mrs. E. C. Cronk, 
superintendent of the Light Brigade of the U.L.C.A., is quoted as saying, 
"North Carolina is doing splendidly and is far in the lead." 

It was announced that, at the convention in 1924, the banner 
would go to the Light Brigade reaching the greatest number of 
efficiency points; in case of a tie, to the one with the highest per 
capita offering. Twelve societies reported a perfect score. The offerings 
were $3,803.24 eclipsed only by the 1929 offering, $57 larger. Having 111 
Brigades in 1926, North Carolina was the first to reach the goal, a 
Light Brigade in every W.M.S. The rally, at which there was a program 
given for the children and largely by the children, was introduced 
November 4, 1928 when five rallies were held in various sections of the 
state; 57 Brigades were represented with 1,122 children. Banners were 
given to Churches having the highest attendance at the second rally in 
1929. In 1932, Mrs. Mabel B. Fenner, superintendent of the Light Brigade 
of the U.L.C.A., spoke to the children at the rallies. The climax of the 
rallies, which continued through 1936, seemed to be reached in 1935 when 
there were 11 rallies, 91 Brigades represented with 2,000 children, 17 
Brigades 100% present. From 1930-1938 more than half the Brigades in 
North Carolina were on the honor roll. In 1938 there were 112 Brigades, 
4,124 children and $2,617.59. 

In January 1939, there was put into operation in the U.L.C.A., a 
new program for the children known as The Children of the Church. 
The parish and church school board was the directing agency while 
the Women's Missionary Society promoted the program during the 
transition period. In January 1941, full responsibility for the program 
was assumed by the parish and church school board, who directed and 
promoted the work through the parish education committees of the 
Synods. By this time the Children of the Church was as widely planted 
in North Carolina as the Light Brigade had been. Mrs. J. Lewis Thorn- 
burg, the first Synodical Secretary, promoted the program through the 
formative period. 

The Children of the Church, emphasized as a program rather than 
an organization, was set up for weekly weekday sessions. It was not 



144 History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 

distinctly missionary but rather all-church. Ten-session units of study 
were provided for the beginner, primary and junior departments. Free- 
will offerings were taken at each meeting. 

District festivals were held in November, at which time a program 
was rendered by the children and offering boxes were gathered. The 
free-will and festival offerings were distributed through the boards of 
the church. Objectives of specific interest to children were selected. 
One year the Board of Foreign Missions' project was building children's 
wards in a hospital in China. 

The Parish and Church School Board has repeatedly given 
recognition to the Children of the Church work in the North Carolina 
Synod. In 1941 and 1942 North Carolina had the largest festival 
attendance and offering in the U.L.C.A., 111 churches participating in 
1941. In 1941 N. C. rose to the top in total offerings and maintained 
that status through 1951, except in the year 1945. 

From the beginning, week-day, weekly meetings were stressed. 
In 1941 there were active groups in 112 congregations, six meeting weekly 
and 11 on a week-day. Restrictions during the war years retarded the 
progress of the work. 

In 1944 emphasis was placed upon meeting weekly for a unit of 
study in the fall and one again in the spring. Six congregations followed 
such a procedure that first year. 

Also beginning with 1944, children using Children of the Church 
literature in the Vacation Church School were counted in the program. 
In 1946, 137 congregations were participating in the program (41 only in 
vacation school). A more intensive program was in operation in some 
congregations; nine held weekly meetings, mostly week-day; seven 
spring and fall schools and six either a spring or fall school. In 1947 
more year-round groups were added and a total of 6,573 children 
participated in the program. The largest offering was in 1950 — $4,383.16. 

The North Carolina Synod was signally honored when the service 
for the dedication of the Children of the Church gifts was held in St. 
John's Church, Salisbury, January 27, 1946. Representatives from the 
boards were present to receive the gifts from the hands of North Caro- 
lina children, representaing the Children of the Church of the U.L.C.A. 
There were 1,360 present, more than 800 being children. 

The one-day convention of the leaders of the Children of the 
Church, first held in St. John's Church, Salisbury, May 16, 1942, became 
a yearly event. It was not attended by children, except for a few who 
took part in the program. The convention was solely for information 
and inspiration. Teachers of the children in the Sunday School were 
also invited to attend. Mrs. Mabel B. Fenner, Miss Eleanor Stelzner, 
Miss Catherine Juram, all general secretaries of the Children of the 
Church, and Dr. S. White Rhyne, executive secretary of the board, spoke 
at various conventions. Much of the success of the Children of the 
Church program may be attributed to these conventions. 



History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 145 

CHILDREN'S MISSIONARY SOCIETY 

The following have served at officers of the various children's 
organizations: 

Secretary: Miss Ella Belle Shirey, August 1897- August 1900; Miss 
Virgie Shoup, August 1900-August 1901; Mrs. J. A. Linn, August 1901- 
August 1902; Mrs. R. C. Holland, August 1902-1910. 

Secretary and Treasurer: Mrs. V. Y. Boozer, 1910-September 1915 
(began serving as treasurer, 1911); Miss Wilhelmina Rock, September 
1915-August. 1918; Mrs. Hubert Patterson, August 1918-August 1921. 



LIGHT BRIGADE 

Superintendent: Mrs. Julia Hall, August 1921-July 1928 (secretary 
and treasurer until June 1925); Mrs. J. L. Thornburg, July 1928- July 1931; 
Mrs. J. F. Crigler, July 1931-October 1933; Mrs. E. R. Trexler, October 1933- 
October 1936; Mrs. R. L. Conrad, October 1936- January 1939. 

Treasurer: Mrs. John M. Cook, June 1925- June 1927; Mrs. Fred 
Shepherd, June 1927-July 1932; Mrs. C. O. Lippard, July 1932-1933. 



CHILDREN OF THE CHURCH 

Secretary: Mrs. J. Lewis Thornburg, January 1939-April 1941; Mrs. 
J. D. Sheppard, April 1941-August 1942; Mrs. Earl K. Bodie, August 1942- 
August 1947; Mrs. Olin W. Sink, August 1947-October 1949; Mrs. Barbara 
Yount Rudisill, October 1949- June 1952; Mrs. Jacob L. Lackey, June 1952-. 

Treasurer: Mrs. R. L. Conrad, January 1939-April 1941; Mrs. H. P. 
Barringer, April 1941- January 1942; Mrs. Maurice E. Miller, January 1942- 
January 1948; Mrs. James C. Grimes, January 1948-. 



III. THE LUTHER LEAGUE 
Chapter I — Before 1900 

EARLY BEGINNINGS 

We have no actual record of the beginnings of young people's work 
in our Synod. But from the Minutes of the North Carolina Synod in 1894 
President George H. Cox reported: "From many parts of our church 
there comes cheering news of the good work being done by the organi- 
zation amongst the young people known as 'The Luther League'." The 
Rev. Cox went on to praise the work being done by these groups in 
making the young people better acquained with the history and doctrines 
of the church. Then he urged all congregations to effect such organi- 



146 History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 

zations, and he set up a committee to study the matter and report back 
to the Synod at that convention. Later in the convention, the committee, 
composed of M. G. G. Scherer and J. D. Shirey, made the following report: 
"Resolved, that the Synod looks with favor upon the organization of our 
young people into societies for effective work in the kingdom of our 
Lord, and that we heartily recommend that a Luther League be formed 
in each of our congregations as soon as possible. Resolved, that we 
recommend the circulation of the Luther League Revievj, as a valuable 
adjunct to the organization and upbuilding of such Luther Leagues." 
That the young people and their work were on the minds of many 
by 1894 is further seen in the report of the committee on the state of 
the church to that same convention of Synod when they asked, "And 
why should not our male members also have their work to do in 
forming Luther Leagues and making the Lutheran Church, her doctrines, 
history, and usages more generally known and loved throughout the 
land?" Thus we know that the young people's work of our Synod goes 
back to 1894, and undoubtedly before that. How much before, we 
shall never know for certain. No records are available to tell us. 

It was the Rev. B. S. Brown, Sr., who could report to the 92nd 
annual convention of Synod the following year, in 1895, in his Presi- 
dent's Report, that "a number of congregations have complied with 
the Synod's recommendation to form Luther Leagues. They are proving 
very helpful auxiliaries to the church in its work. I recommend that a 
committee be appointed by Synod to effect the organization of a Synodical 
or State Luther League, if practicable, during the coming summer or 
fall." 

The committee on Luther Leagues must have functioned, for in the 
Minutes of Synod for 1896 we read that "a State Luther League was 
organized at St. James, Concord, and its constitution and by-laws will 
be presented to this body for ratification". Concerning the relationship 
of this early state organization to the National Luther League, we 
have no state records. But in his book, The Youth Movement In the 
American Lutheran Church, written in 1928, Gerald Jenny says, in the 
chapter on ULCA, "Ohio, Indiana, North Carolina, Iowa, and Wisconsin 
State Luther Leagues organized and joined the National League in 
1896". How many meetings this state organization held, and how 
effective it was, as well as how long it continued to function, we do not 
know. There are no minutes in the Archives. Difficulties of transporta- 
tion and communication, as well as the lack of good literature, hampered 
its work greatly. Yet we know from the Minutes of Synod that in 1896 
eight leagues reported 231 members. This is the first listing of leagues 
we have available. The churches having leagues were: St. John's, 
Salisbury; Holy Trinity, Mt. Pleasant; Macedonia, Burlington; St. James, 
Concord; St. Mark's, Charlotte; St. Andrew's, Concord; Augsburg, Winston- 
Salem, and St. Paul's, Asheville (no longer existent). Holy Trinity, Mt. 
Pleasant reported the largest number of members — fifty-four. There 
were undoubtedly leagues elsewhere which were not reported to the 
Synod. The records prior to 1900 are unfortunately incomplete, and many 
times, inaccurate. 



History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 147 

Each copy of the Minutes of Synod thereafter carried a listing of 
Luther Leagues in the year's Parochial Report until 1918, giving evidence 
of the existence of youth work continuously through these years. Just 
how true a picture they give of the extent of Luther League work is 
hard to determine. We have no reports of Luther League activities in 
the Minutes of the North Carolina Synod after 1918. 

If we must say that the early records of young people's work in 
the old North Carolina Synod are sadly lacking and inaccurate, we 
shall have to admit that they are doubly so for that portion of the 
church which belonged to the Tennessee Synod. In the Minutes of the 
Tennessee Synod for 1901, we have the first listing of Young People's 
Societies in the North Carolina Conference. Those reported were St. 
Matthew's, King's Mountain, with 20 members; Holy Trinity, Hickory, 
with 40 members; and Emmanuel (presumably Lincolnton) with no 
listing of members, but an $18 contribution for benevolences. The 
District Luther League of Western North Carolina was formally organized 
in Statesville on November 20th, 1913. It had been the St. John's League 
that took the initiative and invited delegates from young people's groups 
in several nearby counties to effect the organization. St. John's president, 
M. F. P. Troutman, became the first district president. Meetings of this 
body were held semi-annually until the first annual convention, which 
was held with St. Michael's League, Troutman, N. C, on September 2, 
1920. 

The second and last annual convention of the Luther League of 
the Tennessee Synod was held at Holy Communion, Dallas, on August 
24, 1921. Only a one-day session was held, for it was to be joined by 
the Young People's Federation of the North Carolina Synod the very 
next day to effect the merger of the two bodies. It is to be noted that 
in addition to regular leagues, there were also Junior Luther Leagues 
for the younger boys and girls. But only two such groups were carried 
on the rolls of the league in 1921. These two Junior Leagues were 
at St. Stephen's and Holy Trinity, Hickory. 



YOUNG PEOPLE'S SOCIETIES, N. C. SYNOD 

If we might say that the father of the youth movement among 
Lutheran young people in North Carolina is the Synod, we can equally 
call the Women's Missionary Society the mother. For during this period, 
1900-1920, there existed in many churches a youth group, sponsored by 
the Women's Society, known as the "Young People's Missionary Society", 
or in some cases, the "Girl's Guild". Some churches tried to maintain 
both a Luther League and a Young People's Society, but in most churches 
it was a case of either, or. A Guild existed at St. Mark's, Charlotte, as 
early as 1903, which had as its chief project the support of Missionary 
work in Japan. Besides missionary endeavors, another project of the 
Young People's Society was the annual presentation of a banner to the 
best Children's Society during the year. 



148 History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 

In addition to St. Mark's, Charlotte, we know that a Girl's Guild 
was organized at St. James, Concord, in 1906, a Young People's Society 
that same year at St. Mark's, China Grove, and a Girl's Guild at St. 
Peter's, Rowan, in 1907. These were the first beginnings which grew 
into 25 societies by 1912. 

The Young People's Societies had no separate convention, but sent 
one delegate for each society to the annual conventions of the Women's 
Society. The first general secretary of Young People's Work was Miss 
Marie Yeager, of Charlotte, N. C, elected to that position in 1910. In 
1912, Miss Yeager was succeeded by Miss Constance Cline, who held 
the office until 1916. 

The first steps toward a breaking away was at the 31st annual con- 
vention of the Women's Society, held at Macedonia, Burlington, August 
23-27, 1916. Miss Laura Efird, who had succeeded Constance Cline as 
the secretary and treasurer of Young People's Societies, introduced the 
following: "That the representatives of the Young People's Societies be 
allowed to organize at their business session of this convention." Miss 
Ida Brown Efird of Winston-Salem was elected the first president, and 
Miss Mary Cline of Concord, the first treasurer. Miss Constance Cline 
was elected Young People's Field Secretary. The next year, 1917, she 
was so favorably impressed by the growth of the work and the interest 
shown in the new set-up that she recommended to the convention that the 
Young People's organization be allowed to hold a separate convention 
in 1918, the time and place to be decided by their executive committee; 
and that this committee have the privilege of making their own 
appropriations and disbursements in the future. This request was 
granted. 

On August 13, 14, and 15, 1918, at Sharon and Frieden's, Gibsonville, 
the young people held their first separate convention. They now became 
know as "The Young People's Federation". The retiring president. Miss 
Efird, reported, "We no doubt started out on our first year's voyage with 
fear and trembling, but I am proud to say that this first year has 
been a most successful one for us in every respect. This is the first 
year in the history of the Young People's Work that we have ever 
raised our full apportionment, and this year we have gone far beyond 
that point." Thirty-eight societies were on roll that year. The practice 
was continued to divide the funds equally between Home and Foreign 
Missions. A steady increase in giving is noted in these years. Professor 
L. L. Smith of China Grove was elected the new president, but he 
did not serve out the year, and was succeeded by Miss Ruth Brown. 
S. White Rhyne, of Charlotte, succeeded her as president in 1920, and 
proved to be the last president of the federation. 

On August 16, 1921, at the fourth annual convention of the Young 
People's Federation at Salem, Salisbury, President Rhyne recommended 
that "We declare our Young People's Federation an independent Organi- 
zation, amenable to and under the jurisdiction of the United Evangelical 
Lutheran Synod of North Carolina". This was adopted, and the federation 
now stood ready to merge with the Tennessee Synod Young People to 
form the State Luther League of North Carolina. 



History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 149 



YOUNG PEOPLE'S SOCIETIES, TENNESSEE SYNOD 

The first annual convention of the Women's Missionary Society 
of the Tennessee Synod was held at St. John's, Statesville, October 9-11, 
1914. At that time, there were seven Young People's Missionary Societies 
listed on the rolls. They were: Good Shepherd, Mt. Holly; Oakview, 
Lenoir College; Zion, Hickory; Holy Communion, Dallas; St. Andrews, 
Hickory; St. John's, Statesville, and Bessemer City. The first secretary 
of Young People's Societies of the Tennessee Synod, and a guiding star 
in those early years, was Miss Pearl Setzer of Hickory. Luther Leagues 
existed in many churches of the Tennessee Synod in addition to the 
Young People's Missionary Societies. Statistical reports in the 1916 
minutes indicate that the first Young People's Society of the Tennessee 
Synod was organized at Good Shepherd, Mt. Holly, in 1909. By 1917, 
eleven Young People's Societies were carried on the rolls of the Mis- 
sionary Society, with a total membership of 120. 



FROM THE MERGER OF 1921 THROUGH 1951 

Meeting in convention at Washington, D. C. in 1920, the United 
Lutheran Chuich endorsed the Luther League as its official organization 
to coordinate all youth activities in the church. It furthermore urged 
the organization of leagues along Synodical lines. The newly-merged 
United Evangelical Lutheran Synod of North Carolina, meeting in con- 
vention on June 7-10 at Burlington in 1921, took the following action: 
"That, whereas the Luther League is the recognized organization of 
young people in the United Lutheran Church in America, this Synod 
looks with favor upon the present effort to unite with the forces of 
young people within the Synod into one united body, and that this 
effort among the young people be encouraged and heartily endorsed". 
But already the merger of the Luther League of the old Tennessee Synod 
and the Young people's Federation of the North Carolina Synod was 
underway. Early in 1921, George Nelson, president of the Tennessee 
Synod organization, had sent in invitation to the officers of the Federa- 
tion to join with it in setting up a committee to draw up a constitution 
and make the necessary plans for a merger. This invitation was readily 
accepted, and a committee from the Federation consisting of S. White 
Rhyne, Lena Moose, and Mrs. Roy T. Troutman met with George Nelson, 
Eva Peeler, and Paul Lentz from the Luther League. Two sessions 
were held, the first in Salisbury on February 28, and the second in 
Hickory, July 27. They recommended "that the Young People's Fed- 
eration, having concluded its regular conventional sessions, adjourn to 
meet in a merger meeting with the Luther League of North Carolina 
at Dallas, N. C, on August 25, at 2 P.M., and that the Luther League, 
having concluded conventional sessions, adjourn to meet in a merger 
meeting with the federation at Dallas, N. C, on August 25, at 2 P.M." 
The report of the merger committee was heartily adopted by the 
federation at its fourth annual convention at Salem, Salisbury, on 
August 16-18; and then by the Luther League, meeting in its second 
annual convention at Holy Communion, Dallas, on August 24. Thus, on 



150 



History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 



the next day the rendezvous was kept, the merger effected, and there 
were no longer four different youth groups of Lutheran young people 
in North Carolina, nor even two, but the "Luther League of the United 
Evangelical Lutheran Synod of North Carolina". Fifty-four federation 
societies had joined with twenty-four leagues to form the new organi- 
zation. 



PRESIDENTS AND STATE CONVENTIONS OF THE 
LUTHER LEAGUE FROM 1921 - 1951 



YEAR 


PRESIDENT 


1921 


S. White Rhyne 


1922 


E. R. Lineberger 


1923 


E. R. Lineberger 


1924 


Curtis Wise 


1925 


Curtis Wise 


1926 


Frank Cauble 


1927 


Frank Cauble 


1928 


Herman Fisher 


1929 


Luther Mauney 


1930 


Luther Mauney 


1931 


Luther Mauney 


1932 


Joe Moretz 


1933 


Joe Moretz 


1934 


Catherine Stirewalt 


1935 


Catherine Stirewalt 


1936 


Irene Sox 


1937 


Irene Sox 


1938 


David Cooper 


1939 


David Cooper 


1940 


Elmer Troutman 


1941 


Elmer Troutman 


1942 


Carl Litaker 


1943 


Carl Litaker 


1944 


Mabel Seagle 


1945 


Mabel Seagle 


1946 


Evelyn Troutman 


1947 


Evelyn Troutman 


1948 


Betty Scott Lentz 


1949 


Betty Scott Lentz 


1950 


Ray Cline 


1951 


Jeff Norris 



PLACE OF CONVENTION 

St. Paul's, Wilmington 

Emmanual, Lincolnton 

St. James, Concord 

St. Matthew's, Kings Mountain 

St. Mark's, China Grove 

First Church, Albemarle 

Holy Trinity, Gastonia 

Macedonia, Burlington 

Augsburg, Winston-Salem 

St. John's, Statesville 

Holy Trinity, Hickory 

St. John's, Salisbury 

St. Mark's China Grove (2) 

Emmanuel, Lincolnton (2) 

Macedonia, Burlington (2) 

Holy Trinity, Mt. Pleasant 

Lenoir Rhyne College 

St. Paul's, Wilmington (2) 

Beth Eden, Newton 

Kimball Memorial, Kannapolis 

St. Mark's, Charlotte 

St. John's, Salisbury (2) 

Kimball Memorial, Kannapolis (2) 

Emmanuel, Lincolnton (3) 

Macedonia, Burlington (3) 

Holy Trinity, Hickory (2) 

St. John's, Concord 

St. Paul's, Wilmington (3) 

St. James, Concord (2) 

First Church, Albemarle (2) 



History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 151 

One national convention has been held within the bounds of 
North Carolina. The seventeenth convention of the Luther League of 
America was held at St. John's, Salisbury, July 2-5, 1927. Three of our 
state leaguers have held offices in the National League. Miss Rosa Sox 
was second vice-president in 1927, Eva Peeler, recording secretary 1929- 
1933, and J. W. Cobb held that same office 10 years later. In 1951, Ray 
Cline, of Concord, became the first national president from North 
Carolina. 



FINANCES 

If it is true that "where a man's treasure is, there his heart will 
be also," we might say that the youth of the church have their hearts 
in their work. In the 30 year period from January 1, 1922 until July 
1951, they have contributed $171,261.38. The only time they failed to 
make the books balance was during the years of the great depression. 
The only year the receipts fell below the $3,000 mark was 1933. A peak 
was reached in 1926, when over $6,000 was contributed. It took until 1944 
to again reach and exceed that goal. The greatest financial year was 
1948, when $13,864.86 was given. Since then, there has been a slight 
decrease. Also, in the past two years, 1950-51, we note that disburse- 
ments have again exceeded receipts. 

Many and varied have been the projects which have benefitted 
from the League. There has always been a Foreign Mission Objective, 
and many Home Mission Churches have been aided through the years. 
These include Calvary, Concord; Grace, Thomasville; Trinity, Sanford; 
St. Paul's, Durham; St. John's, Asheboro; St. Paul's, Hamlet; Trinity, 
Rocky Mount; Holy Trinity, Chapel Hill; St. David's, Kannapolis; Mes- 
siah, Salisbury; St. Andrew's, New Bern; Good Shepherd, Brevard; and 
Advent, Spindale. The Southern Seminary was remembered each year 
with a gift for the library. And on five different occasions, contributions 
have been made to the Lowman Home. The State League has con- 
tributed towards the purchase and development of the Lutheridge As- 
sembly Grounds. A scholarship fund has been awarded a foreign 
student at Lenoir Rhyne College, in honor of Missionary Clara Sullivan. 
During the war years a selective service fund aided those churches 
in our state where service centers were set up. In addition, the league 
has always met her obligations to the National Luther League, and is 
looked upon as one of the finest State Leagues in the United Lutheran 
Church. 



152 History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 

IV. THE BROTHERHOOD 



The North Carolina Synodical Brotherhood is stated upon good 
authority to have grown directly out of the Lutheran Laymen's Missionary 
Movement. This movement, intended to bring the men into more active 
participation in the program of our church, had gained great headway 
by 1913. Dr. E. C. Cronk, one of the leaders, directed the holding of 
rallies by the laymen at many places in the South. One of these rallies 
occurred in a theater in Salisbury, N. C, during that year. 

At a meeting of the Executive Committee of the Laymen's Mis- 
sionary Movement, held in Columbia, S. C, on April 16, 1914, the follow- 
ing resolutions were unanimously adopted: 

"Resolved that the Laymen's Missionary Movement direct its 
efforts during 1914-15 chiefly along three lines, namely: 

1. A church-wide campaign similar to that of 1913-14, but with 
concentrated effort. 

2. Missionary training conferences in Lutheran centers with special 
reference to the simultaneous "Every Member Canvass" in March 
1915; and, 

3. Deputation work through teams of laymen working out from 
Lutheran centers and strong congregations, cultivating the 
contiguous fields." 

In the same year, 1914, at a meeting of the North Carolina Synod, 
the following resolution was adopted: 

"Resolved that Synod of North Carolina endorse the Lutheran 
Brotherhood Movement; that a committee be appointed from a congre- 
gation having a Brotherhood; This committee to be at the disposal of 
any congregation desiring to organize a Lutheran Brotherhood." 

A further development came at the Synod meeting held on Sat- 
urday, May 15, 1915, when a paper was presented by Dr. W. M. Cook, 
and was adopted as follows: 

"In view of the splendid meeting held here Thursday night by the 
laymen, I desire to offer the following: 

Resolved 1. That the Synod of North Carolina heartily approves 
the work of the Lutheran Brotherhood, and that we again cordially 
commend it to the confidence and cooperation of the congregations 
of the Synod as an agency of great good in the work of the church. 
Resolved 2. That this Synod provide for a similar meeting to be 
held at the next convention of this body, and that a committee of 
three be appointed to arrange a program for such meeting, subject 
to the approval of the officers of this Synod." 



History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 153 

The committee seems to have been inactive during the war years, 
as no mention is made concerning Brotherhood activity during the three 
following years. But in the president's message to Synod in 1919, Rev. 
J. L. Morgan, newly elected president, made the following statement: 

"Quoting from a letter recently received from the (U.L.C.A.) 
Brotherhood: 'The time is here for the manhood of the Lutheran Church 
to make itself felt in the councils of the nation, and to take its larger 
place in the great work of extending the Kingdom of Jesus Christ. 
Shall we not meet the challenge of the day and rise to our opportunity? 

The Lutheran Brotherhood of America has come into existence for 
this purpose. It is here to serve our church and our nation. It is a 
National Lutheran Brotherhood." 

I most hearily commend this organization to the manhood of our 
Synod, and urge them to a hearty cooperation with same'." 

Beginning in 1920, the Brotherhood movement had found ready 
support in a restricted area of North Carolina centering around Gaston 
county and those adjacent to it. The first Brotherhoods to be formed 
in the state were two which began almost simultaneously at S't. 
Matthew's, Kings Mountain and Holy Trinity, Gastonia. These were 
initiated by The Honorable Bismarck Capps and Mr. William K. Mauney. 
These two then lent aid and encouragement to other nearby congre- 
gations to do likewise, so that in rapid succession six other Brother- 
hoods began at Holy Communion, Dallas; St. John's, Cherry ville; Lutheran 
Chapel, Gastonia; Emmanuel, Lincolnton; St. Mark's Charlotte; and 
Christ Church, Stanley. These Brotherhoods formed a group which came 
to be known as the Gaston District Brotherhood. Many of the early 
meetings were held in mild weather as picnics, and a favorite spot for 
these was at Dallas, N. C. Later the district meetings were set for 
the fifth Sundays, a formula which is still being followed today. 

The first Synod Committee on Brotherhoods was appointed March 
1, 1921 and its members were: Rev. E. A. Shenk, Rev. H. B. Shaeffer, 
Mr. P. M. Edge, Mr. J. H. Dinglehoff and Mr. Leon E. Sloop. In its 
report to Synod in 1922, this committee spoke of the difficulty of forming 
new Brotherhoods. It commended the good work being done in the 
counties of Gaston, Cleveland, Lincoln and Mecklenburg, where there 
existed a group of eight local Brotherhoods. 

Dr. Morgan continued to urge formation of a Synodical Brother- 
hood. In his report to Synod in 1922 he commended the strong District 
Brotherhood in Gaston and adjacent counties, and several other local 
organizations in different parts of the Synod. 

At the regular district meeting, held at Holy Trinity Lutheran 
Church, Gastonia, on the fifth Sunday in April, 1923, a temporary 
Synodical Brotherhood was organized. The Hon. Bismarck Capps was 
named president and Mr. O. B. Robinson, secretary. These officers 
and other interested laymen then met with Mr. Avery R. Rhyne, president 
of the Gaston District Brotherhood, at St. Mark's Lutheran Church, 



154 History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 

Charlotte. The date of this important meeting in Brotherhood history 
was November 6, 1923, and its business was to complete the permanent 
Synodical Brotherhood organization. A constitution and by-laws, written 
by Mr. Harry E. Isenhour of Salisbury, was adopted, and the following 
officers were elected for the ensuing year: president, Honorable Bis- 
marck Capps; vice-president, Avery R. Rhyne; secretary, Harry E. Isen- 
hower; treasurer, R. W. Graeber. 

On May 4, 1924, a second district was organized at Salisbury 
which encompassed the six local Brotherhoods in that vicinity. This 
was then known as the Central District Brotherhood. Later that year, 
when its report was made to Synod, this district reported six new 
Brotherhoods formed in the preceding six months, making a total of 
twelve for the first year of its existence. On November 19, 1924, the 
first Synodical Brotherhood banquet was held at Lutheran Chapel, 
Gastonia, with an attendance of approximately 300. Immediately after- 
ward the annual Synodical Brotherhood meeting was held in Holy 
Trinity Church, Gastonia. 

President J. L. Morgan, at the 1922 Convention of the Synod in 
Kings Mountain, recommended that the Synod establish a Loan and Gift 
Fund for Home Missions. Acting upon the President's recommendation, 
ten interested laymen of St. Matthew's Church, Kings Mountain, proposed 
to give $1,000 each for Home Mission purposes on condition that the 
Synod raise $90,000 to provide a Loan Fund of $100,000 for Home Mission 
expansion. The challenge of the laymen was accepted by the Synod. 

During the convention held at St. James', Concord, on November 
8, 1928, the National Efficiency Standard for Brotherhoods was adopted. 
This standard has since been revised and modified, but originally it 
had four objectives. 

During the 1924 Convention the Brotherhood passed resolutions, 
addressed to the Synod, offering to assume management of the Synodical 
Loan and Gift Fund. The Synod, at a later Convention, approved the 
resolutions, and the Loan and Gift Fund became the chief aim of the 
Brotherhood. 

In 1927 committees were appointed to effect organization of 
Northern and Western District Brotherhoods. At a meeting in Hickory on 
January 30, 1927, 90 men representing five Brotherhood organizations, 
set up the Western District Brotherhood. The final details were com- 
pleted on the fifth Sunday in May of that year. The Northern District 
was not formed until a later date, but by 1928 the Eastern District 
had been added and there were four districts in the Synod. 

The year 1929 marked completion of the first phase of the Loan 
and Gift Fund drive when Mr. W. K. Mauney announced that pledges 
had passed the $100,000.00 mark. While the total goal of the Loan and 
Gift Fund had been subscribed, the current depression made payment 
of the pledges a slow and disappointing task, with a total of $7,307.94 



History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 155 

at the end of 1930 and $13,165.08 a year later. The first loans to mission 
churches were made in 1931. 

By 1930 the Synodical Brotherhood had grown to 57 local Brother- 
hoods or about one to every three congregations. Of these 38 were using 
the monthly topics in Lutheran Men mazagine. 

The Efficiency Standard was in use throughout the Synod with 
many Brotherhoods showing excellent results. 

The state constitution and by-laws were amended to add the 
offices of assistant secretary, statistical secretary and extension secre- 
tary to the state organization. 

An important recommendation of the Synodical Brotherhood of 
1930, was the adoption of an extension program calling for "the establish- 
ment of an active Brotherhood in every congregation within the Synod". 
The plan was adopted at the 1931 convention and became an important 
Brotherhood project, on an equality with the Loan and Gift Fund. 

In 1935 the Synodical Brotherhood Convention amended its by-laws, 
giving the executive committee the power to set up a definite state 
budget. They were to apportion this budget among local Brotherhoods 
and regulate dues. A budget of $1,000.00 was adopted for the first year. 

Provision was also made for a Brotherhood Archivist and Historian, 
to edit and preserve, in suitable form, all minutes and other material 
relating to the history of the Brotherhood from the beginning. 

A recommendation was adopted to effect a better alignment of 
the boundaries of the Brotherhood Districts and the Synodical Conferences. 
During the year 1936 the convention also approved legislation setting 
forth the official method of forming new districts within the present 
Synodical Brotherhood. 

By the last of this year the four objectives of the Brotherhood, 
which had been adopted in 1928, had been replaced by the "Six Objectives 
of the Whole Church. These new objectives were adopted by the con- 
vention at Springfield, Ohio, in October 1936, as follows: 

1. Win the unsaved for Christ. 

2. Bring back the lapsed member. 

3. Develop the church life of our boys. 

4. Increase the attendance of men at the services. 

5. Practice and promote Christian Citizenship. 

6. Meet the obligation of the whole church. 

By 1939 the treasury of the Loan and Gift Fund had received 
$30,000.00. Working with this rather limited capital, the Brotherhood 
had made such splendid contributions to the Home Mission work in 
the Synod that the men of the church were voted special commen- 
dation at the annual meeting of Synod. 



156 History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 

At this time two-thirds of the churches of this Synod did not yet 
have an active Brotherhood, so extension worl^, as originated in 1930, 
was again brought forward as a prime objective. 

Through the boundary realignment work which had been approved 
in 1936, the fifth district, known as the Central District, was formed, 
and all district boundaries were changed so that none would overlap 
the Synodical Conference lines. This change resulted in better attendance 
due to shorter travel distance to district meetings. 

By 1941 the drive for the extension of the Brotherhood, which had 
been underway since 1930, had reaped a goodly harvest of 80 local 
organizations in active operation. By the end of 1951 there were 124 in 
operation with about 50 churches not yet organized. 

In 1943 a new office of Director of Projects and Publicity was 
authorized. Lutheran World Action was made the special objective 
of the Brotherhood for the duration of the war. A revised constitution and 
by-laws was brought to the state convention for study, and further action 
in 1944. The fiscal year of the Brotherhood was established as extending 
from November 1st to October 31st. 

At the end of this year the Loan and Gift Fund had total assets 
of $52,977.09. 

Nineteen forty-four was indeed a banner year for our fast grow- 
ing organization. Extension work produced 22 new Brotherhoods with 
653 additional members. The total of 105 Brotherhoods in good standing 
made this the largest Synodical Brotherhood in the U.L.C.A. Lutheran 
Men subscriptions increased by 646 to a total of 1,744. Congregational 
gifts to the Loan and Gift Fund increased from 18 in 1943 to 74 in 
1944, bringing the fund assets to $65,093.52. 

During the year the Brotherhood accepted the request of the Synod, 
that the Laymen raise $50,000.00 with which to build a church at Chapel 
Hill. The executive committee pledged the Brotherhood to this task and, 
after several years of delay due to enormously increased costs, one of 
the most beautiful churches in North Carolina was formally opened in 
January 1952. 

In 1945 the Eastern District, largest in area in the Synod, was 
divided into two parts to form a new unit, the Piedmont District. This 
made six districts in the state. 



During 1946 a plan was inaugurated to further unify Brother- 
hood work with church work; topics were adopted for each district 
meeting by the Synodical Convention each year. Topics for the first 
year were: 1. Lutheran World Action, 2. Loan and Gift Fund, 3. 
Evangelism, 4. Stewardship. 



History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 157 

The Synodical Convention approved the dues paying plan adopted 
by the Fifteenth Biennial Convention of the U.L.C.A. Brotherhood, at 
Erie, Pa., on October 2 of this year. The plan is as follow^s: 

" 'To meet the expenses of the executive, administrative and pro- 
motional work of the Brotherhood of the U.L.C.A., every congregational 
Brotherhood, or men's organization in the United Lutheran Church in 
America, shall contribute annually, dues into the treasury of the Brother- 
hood of the U.L.C.A., in proportion to its membership as reported on 
June 30th of each year, a minimum of one dollar ($1.00) per each mem- 
ber reported. Payment to be made not later than November 1st in each 
year.' That a similar plan be adopted to meet the needs of the North 
Carolina Brotherhood." 

The happiest event to occur in 1947 was final completion of pay- 
ment of the pledges to the $100,000.00 Loan and Gift Fund. After 25 
years of steady work a dream was now a reality. Mr. A. W. Fisher 
and his associates contributed much to the gratifying results of this 
pioneer effort in providing finances for mission churches in our Synod. 
For several years now a gift fund has been raised each year for additional 
support where it is most needed. The goal for the Loan and Gift Fund 
each year is recommended by the state executive committee and approved 
by the Synodical Brotherhood Convention. 

In 1948 the ten new objectives of the National Brotherhood, as 
adopted at the Allentown, Pa., convention were adopted by our Synodical 
Brotherhood. They were as follows: 



EVANGELIZE 

1. Win the unsaved for Christ and bring back the lapsed member. 

2. Deepen and enrich the Spiritual and Intellectual life of the men. 

3. Increase attendance at church services. 



EDUCATE 

Foster an intelligent and appreciative understanding of the whole 
work of the whole church. 



ENERGIZE 

5. Promote Christian Fellowship — locally, nationally, internationally. 

6. Encourage men of the various Lutheran bodies to draw close to- 
gether in understanding and cooperation. 

7. Stimulate the practice of Stewardship of time, talents and money. 

8. Strengthen the home so that it may be a real school for Christian 
living. 



158 History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 

9. Promote aggressively a Christ-centered, experience centered and 
guided Boy's Work program, such as Scouting. 

10. Encourage our men as Christian citizens to exert an individual and 
collective Christian influence in the community and to participate 
actively in the affairs of government. 

In 1949, after four years of continuous work, the Brotherhood 
Handbook, prepared by Mr. Leon M. Rivers, was declared ready for 
publication. The convention approved the publication on condition that 
the executive committee of Synod give its approval. This was done 
as directed and the finished work met the needs of the Brotherhood to 
the extent that more than 500 copies were distributed during 1951. 

During 1950 a new venture for the Synodical Brotherhood was 
tried at Lenoir Rhyne College. This was a Lay Retreat, held in August 
just prior to the annual Brotherhood rally. The laymen who attended 
were so enthusiastic that arrangements were made to repeat it as an 
annual feature of the summer session. Action was taken to change 
the statistical year of the Brotherhood to begin on October 1st, and 
to close on September 30th. 

For several years the Brotherhood had been the official representa- 
tive of the United Lutheran Church in America in the handling of the 
Boy's Work program of the church. This work was mainly with the 
Boy Scouting program and the laymen of the Brotherhood had been so 
successful that, by the end of 1950, there were 54 Scout Troops operating 
under its direction. 

In 1952 the ceiling of $100,000.00 was removed from the Brother- 
hood Loan Fund and set at twice that amount. The total membership 
of the Synodical Brotherhood reported during 1952 was 3,017. 



History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 159 



HISTORICAL SKETCHES 
OF CONGREGATIONS 



History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 161 



Historical Sketches of Congregations 



I. ACTIVE CHURCHES 

Because of the size of this volume, these sketches have been 
limited to churches within the present geographical bounds of this Synod. 
However, reference is made in the General Narrative of this book, to 
churches that once belonged to either the North Carolina Synod or to 
the Tennessee Synod, which were located i:i Virginia, South Carolina, 
or Tennessee, but which later transferred to one of the other Synods. 
Further reference to those churches may be found either in the History 
of the Virginia Synod, or in the South Carolina Synod History. 



ADVENT, SPINDALE 

Advent Lutheran Church is located on East Main Street in Spin- 
dale, Rutherford County, N. C. 

Rev. J. D. Sheppard, pastor of Ascension Church in Shelby, made 
a preliminary survey of this field during August 1946. The first service 
was held, with thirty present, on August 15. Services were continued 
in the afternoons in the Community Center at Spindale by Pastor Shep- 
pard. The church was organized on Advent Sunday, December 15, 
1946 with sixteen names enrolled. Pastor Sheppard had charge of the 
organization, and Dr. J. L. Morgan preached the sermon. 

On April 5, 1948, a large dwelling house and lot were purchased 
by the Synod for this work at a cost of $18,000.00. The money was bor- 
rowed from the Brotherhood Loan and Gift Fund. 

Pastor Sheppard continued serving this mission until August 1, 
1948, at which time Rev. H. G. Fisher was called as pastor, supported 
largely for the first year by the Board of Missions. 

A second lot has since been purchased, and a church has been 
built on it at a cost of $42,000.00. 

List of Pastors: 
J. D. Sheppard, S., 1946-1948 H. G. Fisher, 1948- 



162 History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 



ALAMANCE, ALAMANCE 

Alamance Lutheran Church is located in Alamance County in 
the town of Alamance. 

A union church program was carried on in this town for some 
years, chiefly by Lutherans and Methodists. Services were held in a 
small frame community church, but no organized congregation was 
effected. Lutheran services were conducted by Rev. H. W. Jeffcoat, with 
Miss Cora Jeffcoat assisting, Rev. D. I. Offman, and later on by Rev. 
Q. O. Lyerly. 

In 1929, a canvass was made to learn who might be interested 
i.'.i organizing a Lutheran Church in this place. Encouragement was 
given to the movement by two leading proprietors of the Standard Hosiery 
Mill in Alamance — John Shoffner and John Black. Rev. F. L. Conrad 
of High Point assisted in this canvass. The whole movement was car- 
ried out orderly, under the direction of the president of Synod. 

On Sunday, June 9, 1929, a Lutheran church was organized with 
48 members. Dr. J. L. Morgan, president of Synod, preached the ser- 
mon for the occasion, and assisted in the organization. Student Herman 
G. Fisher was secured as supply pastor for about two years, when, on 
June 1, 1931, he was called as regular pastor and served until 1938. 

In the meantime, under the leadership of Mr. John Black, the 
frame building was enlarged, brick veneered, and refinished for use 
by the newly organized Lutheran congregation. Rev. C. Lee Shipton 
was called September 1, 1938. Under his leadership further enlarge- 
ments were made to the building. An educational unit with class rooms 
was added in 1939. In 1939, a new brick parsonage was built on a lot 
next to the church. 

Pastor Shipton resigned June 1, 1949 and was succeeded by Rev. 
Paul B. Cobb on July 15. 

List of Pastors: 
H. G. Fisher, S., 1929-1931 C. Lee Shipton, 1938-1949 

H. G. Fisher, 1931-1938 P. B. Cobb, 1949 



AMITY LUTHERAN CHURCH 

Amity Lutheran Church is located in Iredell County, about twelve 
miles south from Statesville and some eight miles north from Moores- 
ville. This congregation was organized April 11, 1885, by Rev. H. M. 
Brown, while he was pastor of St. Michael's Church in Troutman. The 



History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 



163 



house of worship was erected in 1888-1889. It was dedicated April 30, 
1893, by Rev. D. W. Michael and Dr. W. S. Bowman. 

For a long time this congregation was at a disadvantage by be- 
ing in a parish with too many other churches, which limited the ser- 
vices for each place, but at present it is in a parish with Lebanon 
only. The parsonage is located at Lebanon. Within the past year 
Sunday School rooms have been added to the Amity building. 



List of Pastors: 



H. M. Brown, 1885-1888 
Whitson Kimball, 1888-1889 
T. H. Strohecker, 1889-1890 
D. W. Michael, 1890-1894 
H. W. Jeffcoat, 1894-1895 

B. S. Brown, 1895-1899 
R. a. Helms, 1899-1900 

V. C. Ridenhour, S., 1901-1902 
V. C. Ridenhour, 1902-1905 
R. R. Sowers, 1906-1907 

C. R. Pless, 1907-1908 

H. W. Jeffcoat, 1909-1912 



T. C. Parker, 1913-1915 
Jno. L. Morgan, 1916-1926 
E. F. Troutman, 1926-1929 
C. F. Kyles, 1929-1932 
R. H. Kepley, 1932-1935 
O. G. Swicegood, 1935-1937 
H. A. Kistler, 1937-1938 
C. A. Misenheimer, 1938-1939 
J. D. Stoner, 1939-1944 
L. P. Boland, S., 1945- 
L. R. Sloop, 1948-1950 
Supply, 1951-1952 



ANTIOCH, DALLAS 

Antioch Lutheran Church is located in Gaston County, about 
two miles west from Dallas. 

Early records would indicate that a meeting of Ohio Synod Luth- 
erans was held here on September 26, 1853. It appears that for a 
number of years the work was carried on by supply pastors, among whom 
were Rev. Andrew Rader, Rev. George L. Hunt, and Rev. Adam Miller, 
Jr. The first regular pastor here, of whom we have record, was Rev, 
M. L. Little, who began his work in March 1881. Pastor Little being a 
members of the Tennessee Synod proposed to the Antioch congregation 
that they become affiliated with that Synod and build a new house of 
worship, both of which were agreed upon by the congregation. 

Their first church had been built of logs, but it was weather- 
boarded some years later. It was located a short distance south from 
the present church, where the old graveyard is. Their second and 
present building is a brick structure, which was constructed under 
the pastoral guidance of Rev. Mr. Little. The bricks were made near 
the church, under the supervision of Mr. Ambrose Rhyne. The first 
service held in the brick church was on August 16, 1883. There were 
thirty-six members on the church roll at that time. 



164 History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 

Rev. Mr. Little, who was endeared to these people, was killed by 
a train accident in 1891, and Rev. L. L. Lohr was called to succeed him. 

During the pastorate of Rev. B. L. Westenberger, who was con- 
nected with the Ohio Synod, a small group withdrew from Antioch and 
built a temporary church and united with the Ohio Synod, but a little 
later they disbanded and returned to Antioch. 

Sunday School rooms, tower, and other valuable additions were 
made to the church, in 1939-1940, under the pastoral leadership of Rev. 
F. M. Speagle. Their modern new parsonage was built about the time 
that Rev. W. H. Button became pastor in 1947. A newly acquired tract 
of land has been added to their property holdings, on which a new 
church will be built. 

For a number of years Antioch was in a parish with St. Paul's 
and Philadelphia congregations, but in 1947 Antioch and Philadelphia 
formed a parish, with the parsonage at Antioch. 

List of Pastors: 

M. L. Little, 1881-1891 C. E. Fritz, 1917-1919 

L. L. Lohr, 1892-1893 C. N. Yount, 1919-1922 

J. A. Rudisill, 1893-1895 J. L. Thornburg, S, 1922- 

B. L. Westenberger, 1896-1898 C. K. Rhodes, 1922-1928 

W. A. Deaton, 1898-1906 B. E. Petrea, 1928-1932 

P. D. Risinger, 1907-1911 F. M. Speagle, 1932-1947 

Student C. K. Rhodes, 1911- W. H. Dutton, 1947- 
A. R. Beck, 1912-1916 



ASCENSION. SHELBY 

Ascension Lutheran Church is located on North Lafayette Street 
m Shelby, N. C. 

This church v/as organized with 13 members, in the Presbyterian 
Church in Shelby, on Palm Sunday, March 25, 1923, by Rev. H. B. Schaef- 
fer, D.D., pastor of St. Matthews Church in Kings Mountain; and Rev. 
E. D. Wessinger, D.D., pastor of St. John's Church in Cherryville. 

On June 17, 1923, Rev. N. D. Yount took charge of the work as 
Field Missionary of Synod. A Sunday School was started at that time. 
Services were held at first in a school house and then in an Episcopal 
Chapel. 

On January 25, 1925, this mission and the church in Bessemer 
City were placed in a parish, with Pastor Yount in charge until 1932, 
when Dr. E. C. Cooper, Field Missionary, began work in Shelby. The 
lot on North Lafayette was purchased for $7,000.00 on April 10, 1924 



History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 165 

through contributions from members of St. Matthews Church in Kings 
Mountain. 

A groundbreaking service for a church was held August 23, 1932 
by Dr. Cooper, Rev. J. F. Davis, and Rev. C. K. Derrick. The cornerstone 
laying was carried out in connection with the opening of the new church 
on December 18, 1932. Dr. Cooper was in charge of services, assisted by 
Rev. J. F. Davis, and Dr. H. B. Schaeffer preached the opening sermon. 
Greetings were brought by Dr. Morgan and auxiliary representatives. 

The building with furnishings cost approximately $11,000.00 for 
which the Missionary Society gave $2,500.00, and the Brotherhood loaned 
$2,500.00. Other donations came from various sources. 

The North Carolina Synod met in this church May 25-27, 1937. 
On November 21, 1937, Rev. J. Frank Davis was called as regular 
pastor. In 1938 a nice brick parsonage was built by the side of the 
church. Rev. Davis resigned in February, 1943. 

Rev. J. D. Sheppard was called April 1, 1943. A pipe organ was 
installed and dedicated April 25, 1948. During 1949-1950 this congre- 
gation, under the leadership of Pastor Sheppard, was quite active in 
the resettlement of displaced persons. On January 1, 1945, the church 
assumed full self support. 

List of Pastors: 
N. D. Yount, 1923-1932 J. F. Davis, 1937-1943 

E. C. Cooper, 1932-1937 J. D. Sheppard, 1943-1952 



ATONEMENT, NORTH WILKESBORO 

For a number of years, a small number of Lutherans in North 
Wilkesboro have longed for a church of their faith in that place. Dif- 
ferent ministers and students have given them supply preaching ser- 
vices, but they have not had the advantage of a resident pastor. 

On June 3, 1951 a church was organized by Rev. C. A. Phillips 
with 26 members. The name chosen is The Church of the Atonement. 
Services are held in a funeral home. 



AUGSBURG, WINSTON-SALEM 

Augsburg Church is located on West Fifth Street in Winston-Salem. 
The original location was on the corner of West Fourth and Spruce 
Streets. 

This church was organized on September 27, 1891, by Rev. W. A. 
Lutz while he was pastor at Enochville, North Carolina. Student J. I. 
Goodman assisted in the work the latter part of that year. Pastor Lutz 



166 History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 

took full charge of the mission January 1, 1892. Services were held in 
the second story Reform Club Room across the street from the south 
side of the Court House. A Sunday School was started right away, and 
Louis M. Swink, in his teen age, was the first and only person, besides 
the pastor who came that first Sunday. That young man lived to become 
a great leader in church and state. 

The lot for their first church was purchased in 1893, and the cor- 
nerstone of their brick church was laid July 9 that same year. Work 
was delayed on account of a country- wide financial depression; how- 
ever, the church was completed and dedicated, free of debt, in 1895. 

By 1925, the congregation had outgrown the capacity of the church 
building, so a new lot was purchased 150x200 feet on West Fifth Street, 
at a cost of $25,500.00 for a new church. A Building Committee com- 
posed of C. M. Miller, A. W. Lentz, George Roediger, T. L. Stryker, and 
L. M. Swink, with the Pastor, S. W. Hahn, was appointed to have charge 
of the building program. The contract for the new church was let June 
22, 1926 for a consideration of $126,566.00. 

The cornerstone was laid November 7, 1926, and the building was 
completed and opened for services September 4, 1927. 

Soon after Rev. Ray R. Fisher became pastor, in December, 1942, 
a new parsonage was purchased and paid for the following year. 
The remaining debt on the church was paid off by 1944, and the build- 
ing was dedicated March 12, 1944. 

List of Pastors: 

Stu. J. I. Goodman, 1891- E. A. Shenk, 1908-1915 

W. A. Lutz, 1892-1900 I. E. Long, 1916-1920 

E. L. Folk, 1901-1902 M. M. Kinard, 1920-1924 

Stu. C. A. Ritchie, 1902-1903 F. C. Longaker, Sup., 1924 

E. P. Conrad, 1904-1905 S. W. Hahn, 1925-1942 

G. S. Bearden, 1905-1908 R. R. Fisher, 1942- 



BECK'S, LEXINGTON 

Beck's Lutheran Church in Davidson County was first located 
about six miles east from Lexington, but in 1937 a new location was 
secured a few miles north from the original place, and four or 
five miles east from Lexington, where a new church has been built. 

It is not definitely known when this church was first started; 
however, the deed for their land throws some light on that inquiry. 
It reads in part as follows: This indenture made November 5, 1787, 
between John Billings, doctor, and Leonard Smith, etc. of the one part, 
and Martin Frank and Frederick Billings of the Profession of the Church 



History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 167 

of England, and David Smith and Henry Lookinbee of the Profession of 
the Church in the Dutch Settlement on Abbotts Creek, of the other 
part, "Witnesseth that for five shillings — hath sold — all that piece or 
parcel of land, containing fifty-three acres, including the meeting house 
and burying grounds, near Abbotts Creek in said congregation." The 
expression in the deed, "of the Church of England," refers to the Luth- 
erans, and that of "the Church in the Dutch Settlement" refers to the 
German Reformed. 

Two significant statements are noted in this deed; namely, first 
that the land was purchased by the two congregations in the year 
1787; and secondly, that there was already a meeting house and a 
burying ground there when it was purchased. So the congregation 
w^as organized as far back as 1787 at least, if not earlier. 

The first building was a log house which was there when the 
land was purchased. It is possible that a second log structure was put 
up soon after the congregation was organized. Then about 1878, a 
frame building was erected. It was about that time the Lutherans 
decided to build a church for themselves, and so a lot was received, 
by donation from Mr. George Smith, one of their members, adjoining 
the original tract, and a frame church was erected on it. It would 
appear that this forward venture was carried out largely by the Ten- 
nessee Lutheran congregation for it was about that time that the 
North Carolina Synod congregation disbanded and united with other 
congregations. It was during these developments that the Reformed 
congregation raised the question of ownership by the Lutherans in any 
part of the old church property, due to a lapse of time in filling vacancies 
in the list of Trustees for the Lutheran Synod. The matter was referred 
to court, which upheld the contentions, and so the property passed out 
of Lutheran hands after about ninety years of undisputed joint owner- 
ship. 

In 1937 the Lutheran congregation secured a new location a few 
miles north from the old grounds and erected a new brick church 
which is equipped with basement, classrooms, and all modern furnish- 
ings throughout the building. 

Since then, about 1948, a tract of land and a house were purchased 
for a parsonage right near the church. For a number of years Beck's 
congregation shared in the ownership and upkeep of the parsonage at 
Holly Grove, but that was disposed of when the new parsonage was 
secured at Beck's church. 

We do not have a complete list of the ministers who served this 
church, but we give herewith all names that we learned of, for both 
the North Carolina Synod group, and also for that of the Tennessee Synod. 

NORTH CAROLINA SYNOD 

List of Pastors: 

Adolph Nussman, 1773-1787 C. E. Bernhardt, 1787-1788 

J. G. Arends, 1775-1785 Arnold Roschen, 1788-1800 



168 History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 

Paul Henkel, 1800-1805 Jacob Crim, 1839-1842 

Ludwig Markert, 1805-1816 J. B. Anthony, 1847-1848 

J. W. Meyer, 1816-1817 L. C. Groseclose, 1849-1854 

Daniel Walcher, 1817-1821 W. A. Julian, 1854-1863 

Gotlieb Schober, Supply W. H. Cone, 1864-1865 

Jacob Miller, 1824-1827 A. D. L. Moser, 1867- 

D. P. Rosenmiller, 1830-1831 J. D. Bowles, 1870-1874 

Daniel Jenkins, 1833-1834 C. H. Bernheim, 1874-1878 
Benjamin Arey, 1837- 

TENNESSES SYNOD 

Paul Henkel, George Easterly, and others rendered occasional 

supply services in this section during 1822-1832. 

List of Pastors: 

Henry Goodman, 1832-1849 Jacob Wike, 1891-1893 

Adam Efird, 1849-1854 A. R. Beck, 1893-1895 

J. M. Wagoner, 1854-1860 J. L. Deaton, Sup., 1897- 

J. E. Seneker, 1860-1861 C. L. Miller, 1898-1903 

I. Conder, 1861-1866 J. C. Wessinger, 1904-1905 

Thomas Grouse, 1868-1875 A. L. Boliek, 1906-1909 

C. H. Bernheim, 1877-1882 J. F. Deal, 1911-1912 

W. P. Cline, 1883-1891 J. M. Senter, 1912-1918 

UNITED SYNOD OF NORTH CAROLINA 

R. B. Sigmon, 1919-1928 J. L. Morgan, Sup., 1948- 

R. L. Fisher, 1928-1942 D. B. Summers, 1949- 
C. F. Kyles, 1942-1947 



BETHANY. DAVIDSON 

Bethany Lutheran Church was located in Davidson County near 
the present town of Midway, between Lexington and Winston-Salem. 
The deed for the church land was made by Frederick Miller, a Lutheran, 
August 1, 1789 to the inhabitants of Brushy Fork belonging to the 
Society of the Church and the Presbyterian Parties for the sum of one 
pound and thirteen shillings. The Society of the Church refers to 
the Lutherans, and the Presbyterian Parties to the German Reformed. 
These two congregations held the property jointly. The church was at 
first called Frederictown Church out of respect for the man who con- 
veyed the land and took a leading hand building the first church. 

The first building was of logs, about 30x40 feet, with a gallery on 
three sides. This building was replaced in 1861 by a frame structure, 
and the name was changed to Bethany. Regular services were held here 



History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 169 

by our Lutheran pastors with encouraging success for many years. Rev. 
Arnold Roschen, who was pastor here in 1789, said this church had come 
to be the largest of his four congregations in that area. The North 
Carolina Synod met here in 1855. But for some cause or other the 
congregation began to decline after the period of the Civil War, until 
in 1902, a division was made of the property, and the Lutherans dis- 
continued services at that place, while the Reformed congregation went 
ahead and built a new church for themselves. There is a small tract 
of land there which belongs to the Lutheran Church, as well as a 
half interest in the burying ground. We do not have a complete list 
of the names of the pastors who served this congregation; however, 
the following were associated with that work at one time or another: 

List of Pastors: 
Arnold Roschen C. H. Bernheim 

Paul Henkel J. D. Bowles 

Ludwig Markert E. P. Parker 

Daniel Jenkins W. A. Lutz 

John Swicegood H. A. Trexler 

Whitson Kimball R. L. Bame 



BETHANY LUTHERAN CHURCH, HICKORY 

Bethany Church is located on the corner of Main Avenue and 
17th Street, in the City of Hickory, N. C. This church was organized on 
October 2, 1910, with thirty-six charter members, by Rev. W. A. Deaton, 
D.D., who was then Synodical Missionary of the Tennessee Synod. 

Their first house of worship was a frame structure, erected in 
1912, at a cost of $1500.00. In 1927 additions were built to the church, 
which also cost about the same amount, Rev. R. M. Carpenter, pastor. 

In 1926, a house and lot were purchased for a parsonage, at a 
cost of $4,000.00. During Rev. S. L. Sox's pastorate here this house was 
practically made over, in 1937, at an added cost of $5,000.00 Their Rec- 
reational Hall was built in 1938, at a cost of around $2,000.00. 

After Rev. G. Dwight Conrad became pastor here, a new Sunday 
School assembly hall and basement were constructed in the year 1941. 
Then, in 1948, with Pastor Conrad's continued wise leadership, a new 
Educational Building, with modern equipment, was constructed at a 
cost of $65,000.00. At about the same time, additions were made to 
the church itself at a cost of $35,000.00. This congregation has enjoyed 
a healthy development, and is making commendable progress. 

List of Pastors: 
W. A. Deaton, 1910-1925 S. L. Sox, 1932-1940 

R. M. Carpenter, 1925-1932 G. D. Conrad, 1940- 



170 History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 



BETHANY, KANNAPOLIS 

Bethany Lutheran Church is located in Rowan County on North 
Juniper at Eighth Street, Kannapolis, N. C. 

A survey was made in April 1928 by Dr. E. C. Cooper, Field Mis- 
sionary of the North Carolina Synod, in which 89 families were found 
with Lutheran connections. A report of the survey was given at a 
meeting of the Mission Committee of Synod, and they voted to begin 
work here and authorized Dr. J. L. Morgan, President of Synod, to 
secure a seminary student as pastor for the summer. Student C. F 
Kyles was secured, and his salary was paid by the Rowan County 
Lutheran Ministers Association. 

The church was organized on June 24, 1928 by Student Kyles and 
Dr. Cooper. This congregation was received into Synod in February 
1929 and was called the Evangelical Lutheran Church of North Kan- 
napolis. Dr. Cooper conducted services during the fall and winter months 
on the first and third Sundays while seminary students filled the other 
Sundays. Rev. J. F. Davis was extended a call and began his pastoral 
duties on April 1, 1929. 

The Cannon Mills Company deeded a lot 75x150 feet, at the 
corner of North Juniper and Eighth Streets, to the congregation on which 
to build a church. Services were held temporarily in the Woodrow 
Wilson School Building. 

Groundbreaking services for the church were held on September 
14, 1930 with Pastor J. F, Davis and Dr. E. C. Cooper in charge. Pastor 
Davis' resignation became effective that same day, and Dr. Cooper 
took over the work as supply pastor and directed the building program 
of the church. The building is a brick structure with full basement 
and cost approximately $15,000.00. 

The first service in the new church was conducted on May 3, 1931 
by Rev. M. L. Kester. This was his first service as pastor of the con- 
gregation. On August 16, 1931, the congregation voted to change the 
name of the church to Bethany Evangelical Lutheran Church. 

The cornerstone of the church was laid on Sunday, December 6, 
1931, with the service in charge of Pastor M. L. Kester; assisted by 
Dr. J. L. Morgan, who preached the sermon, and Dr. E. C. Cooper. 

A ten-room brick veneer parsonage was built in the spring of 1932 
at a cost of $3,000.00. The lot was donated by Mr. and Mrs. J. W. 
Kimball. Pastor Kester resigned this congregation on February 1, 1935 
and was succeeded by Rev. J. D. Sheppard on June 1, 1935. 



History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 171 

The church was dedicated, free of debt, on Sunday, December 15, 
1935, by Pastor Sheppard with Dr. J. L. Morgan preaching the dedica- 
tion sermon. On November 12, 1938, a Moller pipe organ was purchased 
for $2,675.00. Pastor Sheppard served this congregation until 1943 when 
he resigned and Rev. E. K. Bodie was called as its pastor and served 
until July, 1952. 

List of Pastors: 
Student C. F. Kyles, 1928- Rev. J. F. Davis, 1929-1930 

Dr. E. C. Cooper assisted by Rev. M. L. Kester, 1931-1935 

seminary students, Rev. J. D. Sheppard, 1935-1943 

Supply, 1928-1929 Rev. E. K. Bodie, 1943-1952 



BETH EDEN, NEWTON 

Beth Eden Church is located in the city of Newton, in Catawba 
County, N. C. The first reference that we have found of this work is 
in the Minutes of the North Carolina Synod for 1848, page 22, where New- 
ton is listed as a part of Rev. Benjamin Arey's parish. Rev. B. N. 
Hopkins, a licentiate minister of the North Carolina Synod, took charge 
of the mission in 1850, and it appears that he organized the congre- 
gation that year. 

The North Carolina Synod held its annual meeting at Newton 
in 1853, as the guest of this congregation. 

The deed for the church lot is dated January 30, 1856, and was 
made by A. T. Bost to Jonas Bost and Jacob Lutz, Trustees of the Luth- 
eran Church, etc. (Register of Deeds, Book 5, page 631). 

We have not found any report on the building of the church; 
however, it was a brick structure and stood where the Educational 
Building now stands. 

Rev. Simeon Scherer became pastor here in 1860 and dedicated 
the church on September 30, 1861, and named it Beth Eden Lutheran 
Church. Pastor Scherer was the father of Dr. M. G. G. Scherer, the first 
Secretary of the United Lutheran Church in America. 

During the time of the Civil War, and for some years following 
that time, this work was carried on most of the time by supply pastors. 
Following the resignation of Pastor J. A. Linn in 1883, the North Caro- 
lina Synod Committee on Mission work advised the Newton congrega- 
tion to solicit the services of Rev. J. C. Moser of the Tennessee Synod, 
which was done and Pastor Moser took the work in 1884. From that 
time on, Beth Eden was served by pastors of the Tennessee Synod. 
However, the property remained in the hands of the North Carolina 



172 History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 

Synod until 1902 when it was turned over to the Tennessee Synod free 
of charge. This building was used until the present new church was 
constructed. 

The new church is a brick building of Gothic design, with base- 
ment for Sunday School. The planning and construction were carried 
out under the supervision of Dr. A. R. Beck, pastor at that time. The 
building cost about $35,000.00. It was completed May 1, 1929. On May 
28, 1939, it was dedicated free of debt. 

Meanwhile the old parsonage was moved and fitted up for a 
home for Dr. and Mrs. Beck, and the house and lot, purchased about 
1944, adjoining the church property, has become the parsonage. 

A new $100,000.00 Educational Building was erected in 1949, 
while Rev. H. D. Hawthorne was pastor there. The work of this con- 
gregation is in splendid shape, and is making fine progress. 

List of Pastors: 

Benjamin Arey, 1848-1849 J. C. Moser, 1884-1886 

B. N. Hopkins, 1850-1853 B. S. Brown, 1887-1891 
Supply, 1854- Supply, 1892-1894 
John Swicegood, 1855- R. A. Yoder, 1894-1896 
Paul Kistler, 1856-1858 J. L. Cromer, 1896-1899 
Prof. Lentz, 1859- F. K. Roof, 1899-1905 
Simeon Scherer, 1860-1861 R. A. Yoder, 1905- 

J. L. Smithdeal, 1862-1865 J. D. Mauney, 1906-1909 

Supply, 1865-1869 B. L. Stroup, 1909-1915 

J. H. Fesperman, 1870-1872 V. L. Fulmer, 1915-1920 

J. G. Neifer, 1873-1875 A. R. Beck, 1921-1944 

Supply, 1876-1877 H. D. Hawthorne, 1945-1949 

C. H. Bernheim, 1878-1880 R. N. Peery, 1950- 
J. A. Linn, 1881-1883 



BETHEL, CATAWBA COUNTY 

Bethel Lutheran Church is located in the Oxford Ford section 
of Catawba County about five miles northeast of Claremont. From 
its beginning until 1897 it was connected with the Tennessee Synod, 
but in that year withdrew and remained independent of synodical 
connection for several years. It then united with the Missouri Synod. 

The date of organization is not definitely known. The present 
pastor. Rev. W. P. Hunsucker says that they are planning to observe 
the 75th anniversary in 1953, which would indicate that the church 
was organized about 1878. However there are gravestones bearing 
much earlier dates, even as far back as 1793, thus showing that there 



History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 173 

might have been some kind of church services held in the locality 
at that time. 

The present church is a modern brick structure. It was remodeled 
and rebuilt some years ago, and again in 1951 was enlarged and more 
tully equipped. 

There is no complete list of pastors available, but it is known that 
the present pastor, Rev. Hunsucker, has served that church for the past 
thirty years. 



BETHEL, GASTON CO. 

Bethel Church is located in the northern part of Gaston County, 
on the old Dallas-Lincolnton road, somewhat midway between those 
two places. 

This church was started about 1790, at which time their first 
log church was built. It was situated on the west side of the road, 
north of the Gap of Pasour Mountain. This building was destroyed 
by fire. About 1835 another log house was built, but at a different 
place, near where Landers Chapel now is. This building was used 
jointly by Lutherans and Methodists. It was referred to as the Old 
Log Church. It had a gallery for the colored people. Rev. Adam 
Miller, Jr., was pastor here about that time. 

About 1860, the Lutherans, under the pastoral leadership of Rev. 
George Hunt, decided to build a church for the Lutheran congregation 
at a new location. A lot was given by Mr. William Sloan to the 
Lutheran Christian Society, and Mr. Jonas Senter was employed to 
build a small church 20 x 24 at a total cost of $65.00. The church was 
named Bethel at this time. This seems to have been but a temporary 
building. Then about 1870 a frame structure was built in its place 
on the same lot, which is the lot now owned. But, unfortunately, the 
new building was destroyed by fire in 1892, just a year after Rev. B. 
L. Westenberger became pastor there. After the church was destroyed, 
services were held in a house owned by Mr. M. S. Pasour, until a new 
church could be built. In 1893 the cornerstone was laid for a new 
brick church, however, it was not completed for a few years, but the 
congregation began using it soon after it was under roof. 

When Rev. C. O. Lippard was pastor here, in 1923, this building 
was remodeled and enlarged so as to provide Sunday School rooms. 
A new Parish House was built in 1952 under Pastor Miller's leadership, 
which was dedicated in December the same year. 

This congregation was for a number of years without Synodical 
connection. Then, in 1888, while Rev. M. L. Carpenter, a son of this 



174 History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 

congregation, was pastor, it was united with the Joint Synod of Ohio, 
and remained so until 1912, when it united with the Tennessee Synod. 

List of Pastors: 

J. G. Arends, 1790-1807 J. M. Senter, 1903-1912 

Philip Henkel, 1808-1814 J. C. Dietz, 1912-1914 

Daniel Moser, 1814-1821 O. W. Aderholdt, 1916-1920 

David Henkel, 1821-1830 C. O. Lippard, 1920-1923 

Adam Miller, Jr., 1831- F. M. Speagle, 1923-1928 

George Easterly, 1832- J. J. Bickley, 1929-1932 

George L. Hunt, 1853-1877 H. P. Barringer, 1932-1940 

M. L. Carpenter, 1877-1891 W. N. Yount, 1940-1942 

B. L. Westenberger, 1891-1895 R. L. Fisher, 1942-1943 

J. H. Wannemacher, 1895-1899 L. S. Miller, 1943- 

G. A. Derhammer, 1900-1902 



BETHEL, ROWAN CO. 

Bethel Church is located in Rowan County, about four miles 
from Salisbury, on the highway from Salisbury to Mocksville. This 
church was organized in March 1851, by Rev. Jacob Crim, with twenty- 
one members. The new organization worshipped for the first while in 
the Presbyterian Church in the village and was referred to as Franklin 
Church, built in 1854 it was named Bethel Lutheran Church. 

The first house of worship was built a short distance east from 
the present church, where the cemetery is. It was a small frame 
building with wooden shutters covering the windows. The second 
building is located midway between the old church site and the vil- 
lage, in a pine grove. This church is also a frame structure 40 x 60 
feet. It was completed in 1883, and was dedicated, free of debt, on 
April 29 the same year by Pastor V. R. Stickley and Dr. J. B. Davis. 

In 1928 transepts were added to the building, giving it a cruci- 
form shape. 

Back in 1881 Bethel and St. Paul's churches jointly purchased 
a house and lot in the village of Franklin for a parsonage. But this 
property was later disposed of and the pastor lived at St. Paul's church. 
Just recently Bethel has built a new parsonage near the church. 

This church has furnished many fine men and women to other 
neighboring congregations, and has sent six of her fine young men into 



History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 



175 



the gospel ministry — Turner Earnhardt, Martin M. Miller, J. A. Lock 
Miller, Wesley W. Kennerly, Pleasant E. Monroe, and Moses L. Kester. 



List of Pastors; 



Jacob Crim, 1851-1858 
J. L. Smithdeal, 1858-1860 
Jacob Crim, 1861-1862 
S. Scherer, 1862-1872 
S. Rothrock, 1872-1873 
H. M. Brown, 1873-1882 
V. R. Stickley, 1882-1884 
C. A. Rose, 1884-1899 



V. Y. Boozer, 1899-1907 
R. R. Sowers, 1907-1911 
M. L. Ridenhour, 1911-1916 
E. A. Repass, 1917-1918 
C. E. Ridenhour, 1919-1928 
W. H. Lefstead, 1929-1930 
G. H. L. Lingle, 1931-1950 
J. J. Smith, 1951- 



BETHLEHEM, HICKORY 

Bethlehem Lutheran Church is located in Catawba County, three 
miles southeast of Hickory. 

This church was organized by Rev. W. P. Cline, D.D., in the 
Barger School House with thirty members in the year 1907. The lot 
for the church was donated by Mr. Abel Barger and his son, Gideon. 

The first building was a frame structure erected by free labor 
at a cost of $500.00. In 1936 a Sunday School Annex was added to 
the back end of this building, and the entire structure was brick veneered 
at a cost of -^,000.00. Rev C. E. Lutz was pastor at that time. 

The parsonage was built in 1940, while Rev. G. A. Phillips was 
pastor. The upstairs was finished by Rev. B. J. Wessinger. The build- 
ing cost $4,200.00. A recreational building was put up in 1942 at 
a cost of $2,000.00. Then in 1952, during Rev. H. L. Whiteside's pas- 
torate, a new Educational Building was constructed for $38,000.00 with 
14 rooms for class work. 

This church went on a fulltime pastoral basis January 1, 1949. 



W. P. Cline, 1907- 

F. K. Roof, 1907-1914 

A. L. Bolick, 1914-1917 

W. D. Haltiwanger, 1917-1925 

E. J. Sox, Supply, 1925-1926 

W. G. Cobb, 1926-1927 



List of Pastors: 

G. H. L. Lingle, 1927-1831 
C. E. Lutz, 1931-1940 
G. A. Phillips, 1940-1943 
B. J. Wessinger, 1943-1949 
H. L. Whitesides, 1950- 



176 History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 



BETHPAGE, LINCOLN 

Bethpage Church is located in Lincoln County, seven miles west 
from Lincolnton. The church was organized by Rev. A. J. Fox on Sep- 
tember 12, 1858. 

This congregation has had three houses of worship. The first 
one was a low frame structure with three doors. Two benches were 
provided for Negro worshipers. The second building was erected in 
1891 at the same place as that of the first one. This building was also 
a frame structure. 

The third building, which is the present one, is a brick structure 
which was constructed in 1926 while Rev. F. M. Speagle was pastor. 
It is located across the road from the original location. It has a base- 
ment and classrooms for Sunday School and is well adapted to local 
reeds. 

The old furniture was used for a while. The church was dedi- 
cated in 1938, and new pews and chancel furniture were installed 
in 1941 when Rev. W. N. Yount was pastor. 

This congregation has had several different pastoral connections. 
At first it was with Trinity, then later with St. John's at Cherryville, 
and for a number of years it constituted a part of the Crouse parish which 
continued until 1950. Bethpage and Cedar Grove are now in a parish 
together, with Rev. L. Clement Hahn as pastor. A new parsonage was 
constructed at Bethpage Church in 1951. A new parish house is now 
being built. 

List of Pastors: 

A. J. Fox, 1858-1873 C. O. Lippard, 1920-1924 

M. L. Little, 1873-1883 F. M. Speagle, 1925-1928 

J. A. Rudisill, 1883- J. J. Bickley, 1928-1932 

L. L. Lohr, 1890- H. P. Barringer, 1932-1940 

J. J. George, 1894- W. N. Yount, 1940-1942 

J. C. Wessinger, 1895-1903 R. L. Fisher, 1942-1943 

R. H. Cline, 1903-1904 L. S. Miller, 1943-1950 

E. H. Kohn, 1904-1909 Keith Beam, Sup., 1950- 

J. C. Dietz, 1909-1914 L. C. Hahn, 1951- 
O. W. Aderholdt, 1916-1920 



CALVARY LUTHERAN CHURCH, CONCORD 

Calvary Lutheran Church in Concord is located on Buffalo Street 
in the northern section of the city. 

This church was organized with thirty-five members on April 1, 
1913, by Rev. C. P. McLaughlin, D.D., who was then pastor of St. James 



History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 177 

Church in that city. A lot was secured and a building was started while 
Rev. C. H. Day was pastor, and the church was completed under the 
pastoral leadership of Rev. M. L. Kester. It was opened for services 
on Sunday, November 20, 1921. 

A house and lot by the side of the church were purchased for a 
parsonage at about the same time the church was built. The entire 
plant represented an outlay of around $35,000.00. For lack of sufficient 
funds for further outlay at that time, temporary furnishings were used 
until 1938, at which time new pews and chancel furniture were in- 
stalled at a cost of $900.00, much of which was raised by the ladies of 
the congregation. The church was dedicated, free of debt, February 5, 
1939, by the President of Synod and Pastor Goodman. 

A new parsonage, located on 163 North Church Street, was pur- 
chased in 1949, while Rev. Paul B. Cobb was pastor, at a cost of $12,000.00, 
but the deferred payments for the same were paid off while Rev. 
Glenn L. Barger was pastor. A church hut was built in 1946 at a cosi 
of $4,000.00. 

Soon after Rev. W. N. Yount became pastor here, the congrega- 
tion decided to relocate and build an entirely new church plant. A 
lot, of 250 feet frontage, on Lake Concord Road, was purchased during 
the summer of 1952, and plans were worked out for a new church. The 
lot itself is valued at $12,000.00, located in a new development in the 
northern section of the city. 

List of Pastors: 

C. P. McLaughlin, 1913-1914 G. A. Miller, 1934-1936 

C. E. Norman, As't, 1913-1914 G. B. Goodman, 1936-1945 

B. S. Dasher, 1915-1916 Paul B. Cobb, 1945-1949 

C. H. Day, 1918-1920 G. L. Barger, 1949-1950 
M. L. Kester, 1921-1928 Supply Services, 1951- 
F. M. Speagle, 1928-1932 W. N. Yount, 1951- 

J. F. Davis, Sup., 1932-1934 



CALVARY, MORGANTON 

Calvary Lutheran Church is located on King and Queen Streets 
in Morganton, Burke County, N. C. 

A Lutheran Church was started at Glen Alpine, about six miles 
west of Morganton, about 1884. A small frame church was built, and 
services were conducted by Rev. J. A. Rudisill and other ministers of 
the Tennessee Synod for a number of years. Mrs. J. E. Garrison was 
confirmed in that church in 1886, but later became a member of Cal- 
vary congregation in Morganton. Services were discontinued at Glen 
Alpine sometime prior to 1897, and the church building was sold in 



178 History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 

1908, and the lot was returned to the original owner. But a few faith- 
ful Lutherans who lived in or near Morganton wanted a Lutheran 
Church. Supply pastors from Concordia College at Conover held ser- 
vices at different times and places. These ministers were connected 
with the Missouri Synod. 

About the year 1908 a lot was purchased by the Lutheran group 
and the Missouri Synod brethren; however, no building was erected 
on it. For some reason the supply pastors from Conover stopped coming. 
Then pastors of the Tennessee Synod at Hickory began holding services 
in Morganton. On March 2, 1910, this group, under the leadership of 
Dr. W. A. Deaton, then Synodical Missionary, purchased the old Metho- 
dist church for $600.00. The title is in the name of the Lutheran Church 
in Morganton belonging to the Tennessee Synod, and that of the North 
Carolina Conference of the Tennessee Synod. This building was used 
until 1936, when it was removed to build the new church. 

On September 1, 1932, Rev. D. P. Rudisill became pastor here. 
The congregation, under his leadership, was re-organized June 9, 1933 
with 36 members. By 1937, the new brick church, with full basement 
had been constructed, and on August 8 that year was opened for divine 
services. Pastor Rudisill was assisted in this service by Dr. E. C. Cooper 
and Dr. J. L. Morgan. The completion of this work was made possible 
by the fine cooperation of the pastor and local mission, and the different 
major auxiliaries of the Synod. The building, with furnishings, cost 
about $15,000.00. The church was dedicated, free of all indebtedness, 
on August 10, 1941 by Pastor D. P. Rudisill, Rev. W. A. Deaton, D.D., and 
President Morgan. 

While Rev. A. W. Lippard was pastor, an additional lot adjoining 
the church grounds was purchased for $6,000.00 in the year 1946, and 
on April 27, 1948, a lot for a parsonage was purchased for $1,500.00. 

Rev. John H. Sigmon became pastor June 1, 1949. On March 27, 
1950, work was begun on a new parsonage to cost $14,000.00. On June 
20, 1951, the pastor and his family moved into the completed building. 
Beginning January 1, 1952, Calvary congregation went on a self-sustain- 
ing schedule. 

At the beginning of this work. Rev. J. A. Rudisill and other supply 
pastors served the congregation from about 1884 until around 1897, at 
which time services were apparently discontinued for a time. 

List of Pastors: 

W. A. Deaton, 1910-1917 D. P. Rudisill, Sup. 

G. W. Nelson, 1917-1918 E C. Cooper, 1930- 

Students, 1918-1920 S. L. Sox, 1931- 

F. K. Roof, 1920-1924 E. C. Cooper, 1931-1932 

E. R. Lineberger, S., 1924- D. P. Rudisill, 1932-1942 

W. A. Craun, 1924-1927 A. W. Lippard, 1942-1949 

Vacant, 1927-1928 J. H. Sigmon, 1949- 



History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 179 

CALVARY, SPENCER 

Calvary Lutheran Church is located near the corner of Carolina 
Avenue and Fifth Street in Spencer, N. C. 

Mr. E. L. Ritchie, Seminary student, held services here during the 
summer of 1904. A Sunday School was organized August 21, 1904, and 
carried on in the Spencer School House. 

The church was organized by Rev. Ritchie on September 17, 
1905, in a hall on the third floor of the bank building. A lot for a 
church was secured from the Southern Railway Company July 7, 1906. 
Services were held at various places by different ministers, and many 
discouragements were experienced by long delays before a church build- 
ing could be provided. After a few years the Episcopal Church in Spen- 
cer offered us the use of their chapel, which made the services more 
inviting. 

After Rev. G. H. Cox, D.D., became pastor, conditions became more 
settled, and it was decided to start building. A stone church was plan- 
ned for, and the cornerstone was laid August 2, 1914 by Rev. M. M. 
Kinard, D.D., and Dr. Cox. The building was completed in February, 
1915 at a cost of $8,000.00. A donation of $500.00 was received from 
the Southern Railway Company for the building, and $1000.00 from 
Synod, along with other donations from various churches and from dif- 
ferent friends. 

The first service in the new church was on June 6, 1915 with the 
sermon by the pastor. Dr. G. H. Cox, the text being Psalm 122:1. 

The church was dedicated, free of debt, on May 17, 1925 by the 
President of Synod, Pastor F. B. Lingle, and Dr. G. H. Cox. A house 
and lot were purchased for a parsonage on the corner of Fifth Street 
and Carolina Avenue for $4,500.00, while Rev. Lingle was pastor. 

Rev. Paul C. Sigmon's pastorate was cut short by illness and death 
October 25, 1932; however, he did a fine work while there. A new stone 
annex for Sunday School purposes was built under the leadership of 
Rev. B. J. Wessinger, which was opened for use on December 31, 1933. 

The congregation had, up to 1944, been in a parish with Christ 
Church in East Spencer, but on February 6, 1944, the church decided to 
support its own fulltime pastor. Rev. G. F. Schott was called as their 
first fulltime man. Under his leadership their new brick Educational 
Building was constructed, at a cost of $47,000.00 during the year 1950. 
At about the same time the parsonage building on the church corner 
was dismantled, and a new house and lot for a parsonage were pur-- 
chased on Fifth Street, a short distance away, for $8,000.00. 

List of Pastors: 

E. L. Ritchie, 1905-1907 R. R. Fisher, Sup., 1931- 
R. A. Goodman, S., 1908-1909 P. C. Sigmon, 1931-1932 
R. A. Goodman, 1909-1911 B. J. Wessinger, 1933-1944 
G. H. Cox, 1912-1916 W. B. Aull, Sup., 1944- 

F. B. Lingle, Sup., 1917- G. F. Schott, 1944-1952 

F. B. Lingle, 1918-1931 G. H. L. Lingle, Sup., 1952- 

C. M. Starr, 1952- 



180 History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 



CEDAR GROVE, LINCOLN COUNTY 

Cedar Grove Church is located in the western part of Lincoln 
County, ten miles west of Lincolnton. The church was organized Sep- 
tember 17, 1892, by Rev. J. A. Rudisill and was received into the Ten- 
nessee Synod the same year. 

This church, a brick structure 30 x 50 feet, was completed in 
1892 and was dedicated on the fourth Sunday in June 1894 by Pastor 
Rudisill. In 1938, a Sunday School building 30x40 feet was added, 
which has an assembly hall and seven classrooms. It is a brick veneered 
structure and was dedicated June 22, 1941, by the pastor. Rev. W. J. 
Roof, and the President of Synod. 

List of Pastors: 

J. A. Rudisill, 1883-1895 J. J. Bickley, 1920-1922 

J. C. Wessinger, 1895-1903 B. J. Wessinger, 1922-1926 

R. H. Cline, 1903-1905 L. L. Lohr, 1927-1930 

J. F. Deal, 1906-1907 W. A. Sigmon, 1931-1937 

M. L. Pence, 1908-1914 Wade Yount, Sup., 1937- 

D. L. Miller, 1916-1918 W. J. Roof, 1938-1950 

J. A. Yount, 1919- L. C. Hahn, 1951- 



CENTER GROVE, KANNAPOLIS 

Center Grove Church is located in Kannapolis on Cannon Bou- 
levard in Cabarrus County. This church was first located about three- 
fourths of a mile east of this place, where the cemetery is. Services 
were first held under a brush arbor, about where Mr. and Mrs. Flake 
Edminston's home is. 

The church was organized September 9, 1876, with twenty-one 
members by Rev. Whitson Kimball. A lot for a church was purchased 
from Mr. and Mrs. P. W. Furr on April 6, 1878, where the old church 
stood. Soon a Building Committee was appointed; namely: Fred Cline, 
D. H. Winecoff, J. I. Patterson, W. H. Barnhardt, Peter Glass, and Joseph 
Chambers. The building was started right away. It was a frame 
structure 30 x 50 feet, but was later enlarged by adding transepts and 
Sunday School rooms, while Rev. C. A. Brown was pastor. The church 
was dedicated the first Sunday in April 1880, by Rev. W. H. Cone and 
Rev. V. R. Stickley. 

In 1945, a lot for a new church was purchased on Cannon Boule- 
vard, and on July 25, 1948, ground was broken for the new church. The 
service was by the pastor. Rev. D. F. Swicegood, and President V. R. 
Cromer. 



History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 181 

The church was completed in 1950 and was formally opened Oc- 
tober 6, 1950, and the cornerstone was laid that same afternoon by 
Pastor Swicegood, President F. L. Conrad, and Dr. J. L. Morgan. 

This is a beautiful brick church, with ample provision for the 
educational work of the congregation. It represents a cost of around 
$135,000.00. The first and only air-conditioned church in the Synod. 

For most of the time this congregation was in a parish with 
Lutheran Chapel Church, but by 1945 the congregation had grown to 
v/here a fulltime pastor was called. 

A new brick parsonage, near the new church was purchased 
in 1945. 

List of Pastors: 
Whitson Kimball, 1876-1878 C. A. Brown, 1900-1901 

W. H. Cone, 1878-1880 J. Q. Wertz, 1902-1907 

B. S. Brown, Sr., 1881-1886 C. A. Brown, 1908-1924 
W. Kimball, Supply, 1887 E. F. K. Roof, 1925-1928 

J. L. Buck, 1888-1889 C. E. Ridenhour, 1928-1945 

C. A. Marks, 1889-1896 D. F. Swicegood, 1945-1951 
J. Q. Wertz, 1896-1898 E. L. Misenheimer, 1951- 
W. B. Oney, 1898-1900 



CHRIST CHURCH, EAST SPENCER 

Christ Church is located on the corner of North Long and West 
Earnhardt Streets, in East Spencer; however, the original location was 
on the Salisbury-Lexington Highway, about a mile north of Spencer. 

The congregation was organized November 13, 1870, by Rev. Simeon 
Scherer, while he was pastor at Union Church. Services were held in 
the old Smith Schoolhouse on Long Street, near where the old church 
v/as located. 

A congregational meeting was held at Michael Kluttz's home 
January 15, 1872, to plan for a church building. Soon a lot was pur- 
chased and a small frame building, approximately 25x40 feet, was 
constructed. After the frame was set up, the building stood for a few 
years before it was finished. It was dedicated in 1882, while Rev. V. 
R. Stickley was pastor. 

In 1898 a new location was secured as a gift from Mr. Newton 
Earnhardt, one of the members, and a new frame church 30 x 60 feet 
was constructed, facing Earnhardt Street. It appears that Rev. P. L. 
Miller was pastor at that time. A frame parsonage was built a few 
years later. 



182 



History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 



For some years this church was in a parish with Haven Church in 
Salisbury, but in 1918 Christ Church was associated with Calvary 
Church in Spencer. Rev. F. B. Lingle became pastor about that time. 
A year or so later the church was damaged by fire, so plans were 
made for a new church. The building was erected and was opened 
for services on May 25, 1924. This is a brick building with full base- 
ment. 

This congregation called a pastor for fulltime service, beginning in 
1944, and in 1948 a seven-room brick parsonage was constructed on 
Long Street near the church. 



List of Pastors: 



S. Scherer, 1870-1875 
H. M. Brown, 1875-1880 
W. J. Smith, 1881-1882 
V. R. Stickley, 1882-1884 
C. A. Rose, 1884-1897 
W. Kimball, 1897-1898 
P. L. Miller, 1898-1899 
W. A. Julian, 1899-1900 
H. W. Jeff coat, 1900-1901 
J. P. Miller, Sup. 1902- 
Jacob L. Morgan, 1902-1903 
Stu. E. P. Conrad, 1903- 
C. L. Miller, 1903-1904 
Stu. E. L. Ritchie, 1904- 
E. C. Witt, 1905- 



E. L. Ritchie, 1905-1907 
Stu. R. A. Goodman, 1908- 

C. L Morgan, Sup., 1908-1909 
R. A. Goodman, 1909-1911 
G. H. Cox, 1912-1916 
Stu. F. B. Lingle, 1917- 

F. B. Lingle, 1918-1931 
Stu. R. R. Fisher, 1931- 
P. C. Sigmon, 1931-1932 

B. J. Wessinger, 1933-1944 
W. B. Aull, Supply, 1944 

G. S. Bowden, Jr., 1944-1947 

E. R. Lineberger, Sr., 1948-1951 
G. G. Robertson, 1952- 



CHRIST CHURCH, STANLEY 

Christ Church is located in the town of Stanley, in Gaston County. 
It is not definitely known when this church was organized; however, 
the cornerstone bears the date 1841. The congregation celebrated its 
hundredth anniversary on October 5, 1941, while Rev. J. J. Bickley was 
pastor here. 

The first building was a frame structure, oblong in shape, with 
two doors in the front end. It stood just back from where the present 
building now is. We have no record of when this building was con- 
structed, but the records show that it was used a while before it was 
completed. A congregational meeting was held May 22, 1858, to author- 
ize its completion. Then, several years later, we are told that important 
repairs and improvements were made on the building after which it 
was "Rededicated" on Saturday, June 5, 1875. This would indicate that 



History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 183 

there had been a previous dedication when the church was first com- 
pleted. The dedication service was conducted by their Pastor, Rev. J. 
R. Peterson, assisted by Rev. M. L. Little. It merits our notice here 
that "Father Peterson", as he was affectionately called, served this 
church for a period of forty years. 

In 1899, under the pastoral leadership of Rev. W. A. Deaton, plans 
were worked out for a new brick church. The cornerstone for it was 
laid on October 14, 1899, and the building carried right on to comple- 
tion. However, it was not fully paid for until some ten years later, while 
Rev. R. H. Cline was pastor. After paying off the church debt, Pastor 
Cline led the congregation in building a parsonage on a lot next to 
the church. Then, in 1948, a new brick parsonage was built on a new 
location farther from the church, at a cost of $15,000.00, and the old one 
was converted into an educational unit of the church. 

We have not been able to learn definitely the earlier list of men 
who preached at this church. It is thought that David Henkel, as well 
as others, preached here before a regularly established church was 
formed. 

List of Pastors: 
P. C. Henkel, 1846 A. L. Bolick, 1917-1919 

A. J. Fox, 1854- C. N. Yount, 1919-1925 

J. R. Peterson, 1857-1897 D. P. Rudisill, 1925-1931 

M. J. Matthias, Sup., 1897- J. J. Bickley, 1932-1944 

W. A. Deaton, 1898-1906 C. E. Bernhardt, 1945-1951 

J. F. Deal, 1906-1909 R. B. Cuthbertson, 1951- 

R. H. Cline, 1910-1915 



CHRISTIANA, GRANITE QUARRY 

Christiana Church is located in Rowan County, one mile south of 
Granite Quarry on the Albemarle Highway. 

This church was organized on January 23, 1871 with seven 
charter members by Rev. Simeon Scherer, then pastor of Union Church. 
The organizational service was held in the home of Nathan Brown, 
who lived near where the church now stands. The five and one-half 
acre lot owned by this church was purchased from Nathan Brown and 
his wife, and his mother, Mrs. Amy Brown, for $25.00. 

The first building was a frame structure 35 x 50 feet for which the 
cornerstone was laid July 25, 1871, by Revs. W. Kimball, S. Rothrock, 
S. Scherer, and R. L. Brown then pastor of the congregation. The build- 
ing was completed in 1874. 

The second church was also a frame building 50x65 feet con- 
structed in 1898 while Rev. C. A. Brown was pastor. The cornerstone 



184 History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 

was laid September 17, 1898, by Rev. C. A. Rose, Rev. R. L. Brown, and 
the pastor. Rev. C. A. Brown. It was dedicated January 1, 1899 by Pastor 
C. A. Brown and Rev. L. E. Busby, D.D. 

Transepts, with ten classrooms, were added to this building while 
Rev. H. A. Trexler was pastor, in 1925. Their brick parsonage was 
built about 1931. 

The church was completely destroyed by fire March 11, 1945. 
The congregation then held services in the Granite Quarry School Build- 
ing until they could build again. Plans were made for a beautiful brick 
church with an Educational Building and a full basement and class- 
rooms. The cornerstone was laid November 7, 1948, by their pastor. 
Rev. P. G. Kinney; Rev. V. R. Cromer, D.D., President of Synod; and 
Rev. G. W. McClanahan, D.D. 

This church with its furnishings cost approximately $120,000.00 and 
was dedicated free of debt, April 17, 1949 by Pastor P. G. Kinney, Dr. 
G. W. McClanahan, Dr. J. L. Morgan, and Dr. P. D. Brown. Special ser- 
vices for the blessing of furniture of the church were held under the 
direction of Rev. W. Gilmer Boggs, the present pastor, on September 
9, 1950. 

During the first forty-five years of the congregation, Christiana 
and Union Church were in a parish together. Then for a few years 
other connections were made. But about the time when the two 
Synods reunited Christiana went on a self-sustaining basis for a full- 
time pastor. A recreational building is now under construction. 

List of Pastors: 

Simeon, Scherer, 1871- B. E. Petrea, Sup., 1911- 

R. L. Brown, 1871-1884 R. R. Sowers, 1911-1913 

J. M. Hedrick, 1884-1885 N. D. Bodie, 1914-1918 

Harry Yarger, Sup., 1885- C. B. Miller, 1919-1921 

J. W. Strickler, 1886-1889 H. W. Jeffcoat, 1922-1923 

J. Q. Wertz, 1889-1894 E. R. Lineberger, Sr., 1923- 

C. A. Brown, 1894-1900 H. A. Trexler, 1924-1930 

J. L. Morgan, Sup., 1900- G. W. McClanahan, 1931-1938 

J. P. Miller, 1900-1903 J. W. Iddings, 1938-1943 

N. D. Bodie, 1903-1907 P. G. Kinney, 1943-1949 

L. B. Spracher, 1908-1909 W. G. Boggs, 1950- 
J. A. Linn, 1909-1911 



COBLE'S. GUILFORD COUNTY 

Coble's Church is located in Guilford County about twelve miles 
southeast from Greensboro. It was organized by Rev. Jacob Scherer 
in 1812, who was pastor of Lows Church and travelling missionary of 
the North Carolina Synod at that time. The original name of the con- 



History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 185 

gregation was Zion, and the deed recorded in the courthouse has it 
"Mt. Zion," but it later came to be called Coble's, because so many 
ol the members have that name. 

The first church was a log building with galleries on three sides, 
and the pulpit on the other side. It was used jointly by Lutheran 
and Reformed alike until about 1847, when the Reformed people built 
Mt. Hope Church for their congregation alone. 

Following the organization of the Tennessee Synod in 1820, a 
number of the members formed a congregation in connection with 
that body; however, they continued to worship in the same building 
until 1921, when the two Lutheran bodies united. 

The second building was a frame structure, which was erected 
in 1876, and was dedicated at a meeting of the Tennessee Synod in 
1877. This building was later moved to one side of the lot and fitted 
up for a children's department of the Sunday School. 

The third and present building is a brick structure and was 
erected in 1927, under the pastoral leadership of Rev. D. I. Offman, at 
a cost of about $8,000.00. An Educational Building, costing around 
$10,000.00, was added to the church plant in 1946, under the guidance 
of Pastor Q. O. Lyerly. Their modern seven-room brick parsonage was 
constructed in 1940, on a lot given by Mr. and Mrs. C. A. Coble, just 
across the road from the church. 

Cobles, or Zion as it was first called, which belonged to the 
North Carolina Synod, was in a parish with Low's, St. Paul's, and Richland, 
congregations until the merging of the two Synods in 1921; and the 
Cobles which belonged to the Tennessee Synod was in a parish with 
Melanchthon and Mt. Pleasant. 

Then, following the merging of the two Synods, Cobles and 
Zion congregations merged into one church, and took the name Cobles. 
This church was then placed in a parish with Low's, St. Paul's, and 
Mt. Pleasant, with Rev. D. I. Offman as pastor, up till 1940. Richland 
congregation was placed in a parish with Grace at Liberty, and Melanch- 
ton. From 1940 to 1952 Cobles and Low's churches constituted a parish, 
with Rev. Q. O. Lyerly as pastor. 

Pastor Lyerly resigned, effective September 1, 1952, to accept a 
call to Pilgrim Church near Lexington, N. C, at which time Cobles con- 
gregation decided to call a full-time pastor. Rev. J. E. Smith accepted 
a call to Cobles effective December 15, 1952. 

List of Pastors: 
North Carolina Synod 
Jacob Scherer, 1812-1829 W. A. Julian, 1865-1870 

William Artz, 1829-1854 E. P. Parker, 1871-1882 

Simeon Scherer, 1855-1858 A. D. L. Moser, 1883-1886 

Bryant C. Hall, 1859-1864 W. B. Cronk, 1887-1891 



186 History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 

H. M. Brown, 1891-1902 V. R. Stickley, 1909-1913 

R. R. Sowers, 1903-1904 H. W. Jeffcoat, 1914-1921 

C. M. Fox, 1906-1907 

List of Pastors: 

Tennessee Synod 

Philip Henkel, 1825- M. J. Stirewalt, 1859-1862 

Daniel Moser, 1831- Thomas Grouse, 1863-1866 

C. G. Reitzel, 1835-1837 M. L. Fox, 1867-1889 

J. R. Moser, 1838- D. I. Offman, 1890-1902 

Henry Goodman, 1844- D. J. Settlemyre, 1903-1912 

Thomas Grouse, 1848-1857 D. I. Offman, 1913-1921 

Pastors since the merger of Synods in 1921: 

D. I. Offman 1921-1940 Q. O. Lyerly 1940-1952 

J. E. Smith 1952- 



COLD WATER, CONCORD 

Gold Water Church is located in Gabarrus County, about two miles 
east from Concord, near Cold Water Creek. This church dates back 
to 1768, when Governor Tryon attended services there on August 21 and 
heard Rev. Samuel Suther preach. He was a German Reformed min- 
ister. It is not stated that this was a union church at that time; 
however, it most probably was. From the North Carolina Historical 
Review for January 1930, page 144, in referring to Rev. Nussman we 
quote the following: "During the period of his misunderstanding, Mr. 
Nussman also served, at first, a congregation with an admixture of 
members of the German Reformed Church, whose church was located 
six miles southwest of that on Buffalo Creek." The time referred to 
m this statement was about the year 1775. 

According to Cox and Bernheim's History of the N. C. Synod, page 
104, land for a church site was deeded to the congregation in the year 
1792, by Adam Bowers with Martin Phifer trustee. The house was of 
hewn logs. 

Bernheim, in his Lutherans in the Garolinas, page 346, says: "In 
1797 the Rev. Adam Nicholas Marcard, who had been laboring in the 
vicinity of Cold Water Creek, a newly organized church, became the 
pastor of Saint John's Church and labored there nearly three years, and 
then removed to South Carolina." All this would seem to show that 
Cold Water Church was a regularly organized congregation used by 
Lutheran and Reformed organizations for many long years. 

This church was admitted to the North Carolina Synod in 1814. 
In 1843 a large number of the members withdrew from the congre- 
gation and organized St. James Church in Concord, which left the con- 



History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 



187 



gregation too weak to keep a regular pastor for a number of years. 
Then in 1871 the work was reorganized as an entirely Lutheran Church, 
while the Reformed built a church for themselves a few miles away 
and called it Mt. Gilead. 

In 1888 a new house of worship was built by the Lutherans on 
the old grounds. It was remodeled in 1951. 

We do not find a complete list of pastors for this church. 



List of Pastors; 



Adolph Nussman, about 1775 

Adam N. Marcard, 1797 

C. A. G. Storch, 1810 

W. G. Harter, 1841 

P. A. Strobel 

L. A. Bikle, 1877 

S. T. Hallman, 1882 

J. S. Heilig, 1884 

Whitson Kimball, 1885 

R. W. Petrea, 1887 

A. D. L. Moser, 1888 

J. M. Hedrick, 1889-1893 

J. D. Shealy, 1894 

H. A. McCullough, 1895-1898 



M. G. G. Scherer, 1898-1899 

Vacant, 1900-1912 

C. R. Pless, 1913-1915 

G. H. Cox, 1916-1918 

C. H. Day, 1919- 

J. B. Moose, 1920-1922 

L. D. Miller, 1924 

J. H. C. Fisher, 1925-1929 

L. D. Miller, 1930-1933 

J. A. L. Miller, 1934-1940 

G. B. Goodman, 1941-1945 

P. B. Cobb, 1946-1949 

Glenn Barger, 1950-1951 

L. A. Sloop, 1951- 



CONCORDIA, CHINA GROVE 

Concordia Church is located in Rowan County, on the Landis- 
Mooresville highway, about five miles west from Landis. 

It was organized in 1882, with eighty-two charter members, by 
Rev. W. A. Lutz while he was pastor at Enochville. Preaching services 
were, at the beginning of the work, sometimes held in a grove where the 
parsonage now stands. 

The first church was a frame building 50x70 feet, with a balcony 
over the front entrance. The church was completed and was dedicated, 
free of debt, April 23, 1883 by Pastor Lutz, assisted by Dr. G. D. Bern- 
heim and Dr. S. T. Hallman. 

In 1924, Sunday School rooms were added, and the interior of 
the church redecorated. On Sunday, March 1, 1942, the entire building 
was destroyed by fire. After that occurred services were held in the 
Enochville school auditorium until the basement of the new church 
could be used. 

Inspired by their Pastor, Dr. C. P. Fisher, the congregation, at 
once, proceeded to build a new church. This is a brick structure, with 



188 History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 

full basement, balcony over the front entrance, and ample provision for 
Sunday School and other activities. The building cost about $40,000.00. 
It was dedicated, free of debt, May 9, 1943. 

In 1945, Concordia congregation, which formerly carried on its 
v/ork in a parish with some other congregations, called Rev. H. G. Fisher 
as fulltime pastor and built a new brick parsonage. 

A new Electronic Organ with chimes was installed, after Rev. C. 
E. Lutz became pastor, and was dedicated April 23, 1950. 

List of Pastors: 

W. A. Lutz, 1882-1883 S. W. Kuhn, Sup., 1909 

Holmes Dysinger, Sup., 1883 M. L. Ridenhour, 1909-1911 

W. Kimball, 1884-1885 C. A. Brown, 1912 

C. B. Miller, Sup., 1886 B. S. Brown, Sr., 1912-1915 

C. A. Brown, Sup., 1887 P. E. Shealy, 1916-1917 

D. A. Sox, 1887-1888 C. I. Morgan, 1917-1921 
W. Kimball, 1889-1891 P. D. Risinger, 1922-1924 
C. A. Brown, 1892-1893 C. O. Lippard, 1924-1930 
H. W. Jeffcoat, 1894-1900 C. M. Fox, Sup., 1930 

C. A. Phillips, Sup., 1900 P. G. Kinney, Sup., 1930 

B. S. Brown, Sr., 1900-1904 C. P. Fisher, Sr., 1930-1944 
T. C. Parker, 1905-1908 H. G. Fisher, 1945-1948 
M. L. Ridenhour, Sup., 1908 W. B. Aull, Sup., 1948 

C. B. Miller, Sup., 1908-1909 C. E. Lutz, 1948- 



CONCORDIA LUTHERAN CHURCH, CONOVER 

Concordia Lutheran Church is located in Conover, N. C, in Ca- 
tawba County. The beginning of this congregation runs somewhat 
concurrently with that of Concordia College which was located in the 
same place. 

Their present pastor, Rev. R. F. Lineberger, says that: according 
to the best information he can get, Concordia Congregation began about 
1878, when a group of members of St. John's Church began holding 
services in Conover. It is believed that the first services were held in 
a small school building. Later the group met in Concordia College 
auditorium, until about 1897, when the present brick church was built. 
A. few years ago a large Parish Building was constructed. 

This congregation was a member of the Tennessee Synod from 
its beginning, until 1897, when it withdrew from that body and united 
with the Missouri Synod. It appears that members of Concordia College 
faculty conducted services for the congregation for a number of years, 
before they had a regular pastor. Anyway, we do not have a list of Ten- 
nessee Synod pastors who served it. 



History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 



189 



DANIEL'S, LINCOLNTON 

Daniel's Lutheran Church is located in Lincoln County, about five 
miles northwest of Lincolnton. The fifty-acre tract of land owned 
jointly by the Lutheran and Reformed congregations, which included 
a school house, was a grant from King George III to Matthew Floyd 
dated October 22, 1767. This in turn was conveyed on July 15, 1768 
to Nicholas Warlick, Frederick Wise, Urban Ashebanner, Peter Statler, 
Peter Summey, and Peter Hafner for ten pounds sterling. Then on 
January 9, 1774, those six men conveyed it to the two united congre- 
gations of Lutherans and Dutch Presbyterians. This all shows that there 
was an organized congregation there as far back as 1774, if not earlier, 
since there was a schoolhouse on the land in 1768, which most likely 




Daniel's Lutheran Church 
Lincoln County, North Carolina 



was used for church purposes as well as for schools. It was because 
of this school association that the church was for a long time called the 
School House Church, which name was continued in use until 1830, 
when it was changed to Daniel's. 

The two congregations — Lutheran and Reformed — worshipped in 
a log house until 1845, when a frame building was erected. This frame 
building was used until 1888, when, under the leadership of Rev. J. A. 
Eudisill, the work was divided, and the Lutherans built a new brick 
church separate from the Reformed group, while the Reformed brethren 
remained using the old building until some years later when they too 
built a new church. The new church for the Lutherans was dedicated 
July 28, 1889, under the direction of Pastor Rudisill. 

In 1928, while Rev. W. H. Roof was pastor, a fourteen-room Edu- 
cational Building was put up as an annex to the church, which was 
dedicated July 31, 1938. 



190 



History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 



While Rev. D. S. Brown, Jr., D.D., was pastor there, a Recreational 
Building was constructed on the church grounds. Daniel's congregation 
is now constructing a new parsonage on land donated for that purpose. 

The first pastor to serve this church was Rev. J. G. Arends, who 
came to this country from Germany in 1773 and lived in Rowan County 
until 1785, at which time he moved to Lincoln County and took charge 
of all the Lutheran churches west of the Catawba River. He had, how- 
ever, made repeated pastoral visits to these churches while yet serving 
Organ Church in Rowan County. He continued as pastor here until his 
death in 1807. Rev. Philip Henkel was called to this work in 1808 and 
continued until 1814, when he resigned to accept a call to a parish in 
Tennessee. The pastors who followed here are listed herewith. How- 
ever, we are not sure of the dates for some of the older ones. 



List of Pastors: 



J. G. Arends, 1785-1807 
Philip Henkel, Ast., 1805-1807 
Philip Henkel, 1808-1814 
David Henkel, 1814-1825 
Daniel Moser, 1825-1834 
Adam Miller, Jr., 1835-1846 
P. C. Henkel, 1847-1855 
A. J. Fox, 1855-1875 
J. R. Peterson, 1876-1882 
M. L. Little, 1882-1883 
J. A. Rudisill, 1884-1894 
J. C. Wessinger, 1894-1895 



E. J. Sox, 1895-1896 
M. L. Pence, 1896-1899 
J. P. Price, 1901-1906 
L. L. Lohr, 1907-1918 
L. L. Lohr, 1919-1922 
R. M. Carpenter, 1923-1925 
W. H. Roof, 1926-1939 
B. S. Brown, Jr., 1939-1946 
John Hall, Sup., 1946 
H. H. Ritchie, 1946-1951 
O. K. Knight, 1952- 



DUTCHMAN'S CREEK (REFORMATION). DAVIE CO. 

Dutchman's Creek Church was first located in Davie (formerly 
Rowan) County, about five miles east from Mocksville. About 1760 
a number of German families settled in that vicinity, some of them 
from Heidelberg, Germany, and so the church was often called the 
Heidelberg Church. 

It is not known when the church was first organized, but baptismal 
records date back as far as 1766, by Rev. Valentine Beck, Rev. Paul 
Henkel, and others. Rev. Paul Henkel rendered pastoral services here 
as early as 1785, see Bernheim page 368. The old Church Record Book 
is labeled, "Heidelberg E. Lutheran Church Register," which carries lists 
of early baptisms, communions, and other church services. 

Their church was a log building which has long since given way 
to decay. There was a metal raven mounted on the comb of the roof, 



History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 191 

a symbol of divine providence, which was discarded when the old church 
building was pulled down, but which was later picked up and placed 
on a privately owned building. 

By 1815 this congregation decided to relocate. A lot was secured 
in the Jerusalem settlement, on the road from Salisbury to Mocksville, 
and a new church built there. Mr. Nicholas Click, one of the Lutheran 
members, offered to give the lot for the church. After the church was 
built, a meeting was held to decide on a name for the new church. Rev. 
Gottlieb Schober of the Lutheran Synod was at the meeting. The name 
chosen was New Jerusalem. Lutheran Ministers who served the church 
at that place were: Rev. R. J. Miller, Rev. J. B. Anthony, Rev. Jacob 
Crim, and Rev. L. C. Groseclose. Trustees for New Jerusalem Church 
were: Henry Clement, Sr., Nicholas Click, Jr., John H. Freeling. The 
church council elected July 28, 1861, was: Nicholas Click and Matthias 
Miller, Elders; Daniel Swicegood and David Swicegood, Deacons. 

In 1873 the congregation was again relocated. One of the leading 
Lutherans, Mr. Matthias Miller, offered a tract of land about two miles 
east from the Jerusalem community, which was accepted, and a new 
frame church erected there about that time. Again the church was 
reorganized and was named Reformation; however, it was popularly 
called Cherry Hill. Rev. J. D. Bowles and Rev. P. E. Zink were the pastors 
who assisted in this reorganization. Rev. H. M. Brown was soon called 
as pastor, and the work went on encouragingly for a number of years. 
Then, members moved away, and by 1925 there were only occasional 
services held. 

The following brethren served the Dutchman's Creek congrega- 
tion at one time or another: 

List of Pastors: 
At Dutchman's Creek: 
Paul Henkel, 1785-1789 Paul Henkel, 1800-1805 

Arnold Roschen, 1789-1800 Ludwig Markert, 1805-1816 

At New Jerusalem: 
Gottlieb Schober, 1815-1821 Jacob Crim, 1843-1860 

R. J. Miller, 1816-1821 L. C. Groseclose, 1861-1863 

Supplied, 1821-1843 Caleb Lentz, 1863-1864 

J. B. Anthony, Sup., 1834 W. R. Ketchie, 1869-1870 

At Reformation: 
J. D. Bowles, 1870-1873 P. J. Wade, 1895 and in 1898 

H. M. Brown, 1874-1880 G. H. L. Lingle, 1907-1909 

W. A. Julian, 1880-1885 J. L. Smith, 1911-1912 

J. M. Hedrick, 1885-1887 N. D. Bodie, 1912-1913 

R. L. Brown, 1888-1892 W. C. Buck, 1914-1915 

E. P. Parker, 1893-1894 M. L. Ridenhour, 1915-1916 

H. E. H. Sloop, 1896-1897 M. L. Kester, 1918-1919 

Whitson Kimball, 1897 C. E. Ridenhour, 1919-1925 



192 History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 

ebenezer church. newton 

Ebenezer Lutheran Church is located in Catawba County, ten miles 
east of Newton, in a rural community. 

The date given for the organization of this church is 1889. The 
congregation has had two houses of worship, both of them frame struc- 
tures. The first church was built about the time the congregation was 
organized. The present church was erected in 1942, and was dedicated 
August 20 of that same year, by President J. L. Morgan, and their 
pastor, Rev. E. R. Lineberger. 

This church is in a parish with St. James near Newton, and 
receives afternoon preaching services. 

List of Pastors: 
J. L. Cromer, 1899-1900 C. L Morgan, 1913-1917 

R. A. Yoder, 1901-1905 W. J. Boger, 1918-1936 

J. A. Arndt, 1906-1909 Leo Smith, Sup., 19-36 

W. D. Wise, Ast., 1908-1909 E. R. Lineberger, 1936-1947 

W. D. Wise, 1909-1912 G. L. Hill, 1948- 



EBENEZER, ROWAN CO. 

Ebenezer Church in Rowan County is located on the old road 
from Salisbury to Concord, and about midway between Organ Church 
and China Grove. This work was started in 1866 when a number of 
Lutherans living in that community requested Conference to authorize 
the formation of a new congregation in that area. The request was 
granted, and Rev. G. D. Bernheim, Dr. P. A. Sifferd and Capt. J. A. Fisher 
were appointed a committee to help carry out the organization. The 
matter was approved by Synod in 1867, and on Sunday, June 3, that 
year Ebenezer Lutheran Church was formally organized with nineteen 
members. Officers elected were Dr. P. A. Sifferd and Frederick Stire- 
walt. Elders; and Moses J. Barger and J. A. Eddleman, Deacons. 

A three and one-half acre lot was donated by Frederick and Paul 
Stirewalt, and in 1868 a frame church 40 x 60 feet was constructed. 
The church was dedicated, free of debt, January 31, 1869 by Pastor G. 
D. Bernheim and Dr. L. A. Bikle. 

In 1879 this church was placed in a parish with Organ Church, 
and a parsonage was built at Organ Church, Ebenezer having a third 
interest in the building. This arrangement continued until about 1927, 
when each of these churches went on a fulltime basis for a pastor. 

In 1939, under the pastoral leadership of Rev. P. G. Kinney, the 
church was remodeled — a full basement was made under the old build- 
ing, the entire building was brick veneered on the outside, and the 
interior completely refinished, and refurnished. The building was re- 
opened and a cornerstone laid November 26, 1939. The remodeled house 



History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 193 

of worship was rededicated May 30, 1943. The work which was done 
cost about $10,000.00. In 1947, while Rev. L. C. Hahn was pastor, a new 
brick parsonage was built at a cost of $14,000.00. 

List of Pastors: 

G. D. Bernheim, 1867-1870 L. L. Lohr, 1918-1919 

L. A. Bikle, 1870-1875 M. L. Ridenhour, 1919-1922 

W. Kimball, 1875-1876 P. L. Miller, 1922-1927 

R. W. Petrea, 1876-1877 B S. Brown, Sr., 
S. S. Rahn, 1878-1879 Supply, 1927-1930 

S. Rothrock, 1879-1885 Stu. J. W. Iddings, 1927-1930 

W. R. Brown, 1886-1893 J. W. Iddings, 1930-1938 

G. H. Cox, 1894-1903 P. G. Kinney, 1938-1943 

C. A. Brown, 1904-1907 L. C. Hahn, 1943-1950 

H. A. Trexler, 1908-1913 G. H. Rhodes, Sup., 1951 

R. R. Sowers, 1914-1918 H. F. Lineberger, 1952- 



EMMANUEL LUTHERAN CHURCH, DAVIDSON COUNTY 

Emmanuel Lutheran Church in Davidson County was located 
about four miles south of Thomasville. This congregation was organ- 
ized in 1813, as a so-called union church, in which the church property 
was owned jointly by the Lutheran congregation and the Reformed 
congregation. 

In that same year, 1813, three acres of land were deeded to Philip 
Kanoy, Jacob Myers, and John Bowers, "Elders of the Presbyterian and 
Lutheran German Churches or their successors in said churches", by 
John Myers and his wife Elizabeth for a consideration of five dollars. 

In 1814 the two congregations built a union house of worship. 
Legend has it that one Gottlieb Grimes, a staunch Lutheran, struck the 
first lick with axe in felling a tree for this church. This building served 
the two congregations until 1901, when, on December 12, it was de- 
stroyed by fire. A new and more modern building was constructed by 
the combined efforts of the two congregations the next year. 

However, in 1925, the Lutheran congregation sold its interest in 
the building to the Reformed Church for a consideration of $400.00, and 
the fifty or more Lutheran members transferred their membership to 
neighboring Lutheran churches — some to Grace Church in Thomasville, 
and others to Holly Grove. 

Sometime after the Tennessee Synod was organized, Emmanuel's 
congregation was affiliated with that body, in a parish with the Ten- 
nessee groups in Pilgrim and other congregations of that county. 
Hence a list of pastors for Emmanuel's may be found in the history of 
Pilgrim congregation. 



194 History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 



EMMANUEL, HIGH POINT 

Emmanuel Lutheran Church in High Point is located on the cor- 
ner of North Main and Howell Streets. However, it was first located 
on English Street, and was called the Woman's Memorial Lutheran 
Church. 

This work was started in 1907, when a number of Lutherans in 
High Point petitioned the Executive Committee of Synod for assistance 
in establishing a church there. Rev. J. L. Morgan, Field Missionary of 
the North Carolina Synod, took charge of the work July 4, 1907. The 
first service was held in the old Opera House on North Main Street on 
Sunday, July 7, 1907, with an attendance of 26 persons. 

Beginning with January 1908, the Young Men's Reading Room on 
North Main Street was used for a place of worship until the new church 
was ready for use. Formal organization of the church was effected in 
the Reading Room on Sunday, February 16, 1908, with forty-one members. 

With the help of Synod, a lot was purchased on English Street, 
and on September 10, 1908, a contract was let for a brick building to 
cost $4,600.00. The Women's Missionary Society took on this mission 
as a "Special" and contributed liberally toward the building of the 
church. The first service was held in the church March 28, 1909, when 
Rev. J. B. Shoup — Mrs. Morgan's father — preached from Isaiah 6:8. 

After the church was completed. Pastor Morgan moved to Moores- 
ville to direct the building of a church at that place. His last sermon 
at High Point was on September 19, 1909, and the family moved Septem- 
ber 30th, leaving the work in charge of Rev. M. L. Canup. 

This church was dedicated April 24, 1910, by Dr. V. Y. Boozer, 
then President of Synod; Missionary J. L. Morgan; and Pastor M- L. 
Canup. 

Rev. P. D. Brown took charge of the work May 15, 1913. In 1915 
a house and lot were purchased on English Street for a parsonage. Due 
to business buildings being constructed near the church property, it was 
decided to relocate the place of worship. The church was, therefore, sold 
on August 2, 1919, and the present lot, on North Main Street, was pur- 
chased from Dr. C. E. Reitzel. 

The new church building, costing about $65,000.00, was begun 
June 4, 1920, and the cornerstone was laid October 31, 1920, by Pastor 
Brown and President Morgan. The building was opened for services 
July 3, 1921, and one week later Pastor Brown preached his last sermon 
as pastor of this congregation, after which he moved to Columbia, South 
Carolina. 

On September 5, 1920, the name of the church was changed from 
Woman's Memorial to Emmanuel Lutheran Church, by request of the 
Women's Society. 



History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 195 

Rev. F. L. Conrad was called to succeed Rev. Brown and took charge 
August 1, 1921. In 1922 the parsonage on English Street was sold and 
a new brick parsonage was built on the south end of the church lot. 
The basement of the church was completed for use in 1924, and by 
1936 the $35,000.00 debt for the church building, as of 1921, was paid 
off, and the church was dedicated December 6, 1936, by Pastor Conrad 
and President J. L. Morgan. 

In 1937 the parsonage on Woodrow Avenue was purchased for 
$6,000.00, and the building back of the church was converted into educa- 
tional and office purposes. 

Dr. Conrad, having been elected as President of Synod in 1949, 
relinquished the High Point parish June 27, 1949. Rev. Harry D. Haw- 
thorne was called and took up the work of the parish October 1, 1949. 

On April 20, 1952, groundbreaking services were held for a new 
Educational Building in place of the old parsonage at the back of the 
church, at a probable cost of around $70,000.00. 

List of Pastors: 
Jacob L. Morgan, 1907-1909 F. L. Conrad, 1921-1949 

M. L. Canup, 1909-1912 • H. D. Hawthorne, 1949- 

P. D. Brown, 1913-1921 



EMMANUEL LUTHERAN CHURCH, LINCOLNTON 

Emmanuel Lutheran Church, formerly known as the Old White 
Church, is located right in the center of the town of Lincolnton, in 
Lincoln County. This congregation originally owned its property jointly 
with the Reformed congregation. Their first building is said to have 
been the first house of worship, of any kind, erected in this town. 

We do not know definitely when this church was organized, how- 
ever the date given for it in the more recent minutes of Synod is 1787, 
which is probably correct. The deed for their first tract of land is 
dated January 10, 1788, when Joseph Dickson, as Trustee for Lincoln 
County, conveyed two acres and sixteen poles, in the Southeast Square 
of the Town of Lincolnton, to Christian Reinhardt, agent for the Dutch 
Presbyterians and Andrew Heedick, agent for the Dutch Lutherans, in 
a part of which the Dutch Meeting House for public worship stood. 

It is stated in "Historical Sketches of the Reformed Church", page 
275, that this Dutch Meeting House was a small one-story log building, 
but that in 1819 a second story was added, a gallery constructed, and 
that it was then weatherboarded and ceiled. In 1830 the building was 
painted white, hence called the Old White Church. 

This Old White Church is associated with some very interesting 
history. It was here that the adjourned meeting for organizing the 



196 



History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 




Emmanuel Lutheran Church 

LiNcoLNTON, North Carolina 



History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 197 

North Carolina Synod was held on October 17, 1803. Also, the annual 
meeting of the N. C. Synod of 1820 was held here, which eventuated 
in the organization of the Tennessee Synod on July 17, that same year, 
in Solomon's Church, Greene County, Tennessee. Emmanuel united with 
that Synod. 

However, this church was not without its share of disappoint- 
ments also, "for it must needs be that offences come", so in course of 
time it became necessary to call on the church at large for help to meet 
current expenses. This condition was due to a lack of fulltime pastoral 
services, and, consequently, a let down in interest. Beginning about 
1830, and continuing for nearly sixty years, this congregation had to 
rely on supply preaching for spiritual leadership. But, by 1890 efforts 
were made, by neighboring pastors, to revive the congregation. Dr. L. 
A. Bikle, among others, began holding services, at stated times, in the 
Old White Church. 

On Saturday, December 23, 1893, the Old White Church went up in 
flames. It being a log structure, weatherboarded and ceiled inside, 
burned a long time before it fell. It is said that as the walls swayed 
from the burning heat and winds, the old bell in the tower tolled a 
heart rending wail. 

Services were held in the Methodist Church, while plans were 
made and carried out for a new building. By this time Rev. J. F. Moser 
had been called as pastor, who reorganized the congregation with four- 
teen members, and led them successfully in building their new house 
of worship. The hearts of the people were rejoiced over their completed 
brick church. It was about this time that the Lutherans bought the 
half interest which the Reformed congregation had in the old property, 
so that from now on it belonged entirely to the Lutherans. 

In 1910, while Dr. R. A. Yoder was pastor here, the church nave 
was enlarged to make room for the growing congregation. However, 
by 1917 it became necessary to plan for still more room. So, a lot for 
a new church was purchased just across the street from the old build- 
ing, and plans made for a new building. But World War I delayed 
matters until 1920, when the new church was built. The church, a 
brick structure, with modern equipment, including a ground story for 
educational work, was completed for approximately $65,000.00. Rev. W. 
J. Roof was pastor in charge of the work at that time. 

This building was dedicated, free of debt, in October 1920, and 
during the 12th to the 16th of the same month and year, the Tennessee 
Synod held its Centennial Convention here, at which meeting it was 
decided to reunite with the North Carolina Synod, which reunion was 
happily consummated on March 2, 1921, in St. John's Lutheran Church, 
in Salisbury. 

In 1924, while Dr. V. C. Ridenhour was pastor here, the old par- 
sonage on South Aspin Street, opposite the church, was sold, and a new 
brick parsonage was built on East Main Street. The first unit of the 



198 History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 

new Educational Building was put up in 1942 under the pastoral leader- 
ship of Dr. L. A. Thomas. The second unit is now being planned for 
early construction. 

In 1951 the congregation disposed of a portion of the old cemetery 
lands, and made extensive improvements on the retained portion, in 
which are the graves of the first pastor and his wife of this church, the 
Rev. and Mrs. John Gottfried Arends. An appropriate historical marker 
will be erected to direct public attention to these graves. 

Pastor Arends served this church from 1785 until about 1805, when 
failing eyesight compelled him to turn the work over largely to an 
assistant pastor, however he remained the official pastor until his 
death in 1807. 

We have not been able to get a complete list of pastors for this 
church, or accurate dates for some of them. Rev. Mr. Arends comes 
first, who was assisted for a short while during the summer of 1803 by 
Rev. Paul Henkel. Rev. Philip Henkel was regular assistant 1805-1807, 
and then in 1808 he became regular pastor. 

List of Pastors: 

J. G. Arends, 1785-1807 J. Allen Arndt, 1898-1899 

Paul Henkel, As't, 1803 J. C. Dietz, 1900-1903 

Philip Henkel, As't, 1805-1807 H. J. Matthias, 1903-1905 

Philip Henkel, 1808-1814 R. A. Yoder, 1905-1911 

Daniel Moser, 1815-1820 Enoch Kite, 1911-1918 

David Henkel, 1821-1830 W. J. Roof, 1918-1923 

Adam Miller, Jr., 1830-1840 V. C. Ridenhour, 1923-1930 

Supply Services, 1830-1890 V. R. Cromer, 1930-1936 

L. A. Bikle, Sup., 1890 L. A. Thomas, 1936-1945 

J. F. Moser, 1892-1895 A. H. Keck, Jr., 1946-1948 

W. P. Cline, Sup., 1895 H. A. McCullough, Jr., 1948- 



EMMANUEL, ROCKWELL 

Emmanuel Church is located in Rowan County, about two miles 
south from Rockwell. This church was organized on Easter Sunday, 
April 14, 1895, with sixteen members. The name chosen was Emmanuel. 
The officers who were elected and installed that day by Dr. G. H. Cox, 
pastor in charge of the organization were: Calvin L. Brown and M. J. 
Earnhardt, Elders; and Luther C. Miller and Julius A. Earnhardt, 
Deacons. 

Sunday School had been carried on in this section for more than 
thirty years, using the Elm Grove School House, where also preaching 
was held occasionally. The congregation was organized under the aus- 



History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 199 

pices of the pastor and officers of the Organ Church parish. So, the 
new congregation was, for the first year, served by the Organ Church 
pastor — Dr. G. H. Cox — with afternoon preaching twice each month. 

A two-acre lot was purchased right away from Eli Brown, and 
the house of worship started by the labors of the members themselves — 
young and old, men and women. The cornerstone of their new brick 
church was laid August 19, 1897, and on the fifth Sunday in October 
1898, the church was dedicated by the pastor, Rev. R. L. Brown, assisted 
by his brother Rev. H. M. Brown, Rev. C. A. Brown, and others. A 
steeple was built to the church, and a bell installed in 1915. A Sunday 
School annex was built in 1927, under Dr. C. P. Fisher's leadership. 
An Organizational Building was constructed in 1944 on the old Elm 
Grove School grounds. This church was in a parish with Faith 1903- 
1918, and then with St. James until 1949. It and St. James purchased 
a parsonage in Rockwell in 1919, but later sold it and in 1948 built 
her own parsonage at Emmanuel's church for $14,000.00. Then, on 
January 1, 1949, they called Rev. Glenn A. Yount as fulltime pastor. 

List of Pastors: 

G. H. Cox, 1895-1897 J. A. Yount, Supply, 1925 

R. L. Brown, 1897-1900 E. R. Trexler, Supply, 1925 

J. H. C. Fisher, 1900-1902 C. P. Fisher, Sr., 1926-1930 

C. P. Fisher, Sr., 1903-1918 J. D. Sheppard, 1930-1935 

M. L. Ridenhour, Sup., 1918 J. E. Walker, 1935-1942 

G. O. Ritchie, 1918-1919 E. L. Misenheimer, 1943-1948 

C. R. Pless, 1919-1922 G. A. Yount, 1949- 
E. F. K. Roof, 1922-1925 



FAITH CHURCH, FAITH 

Faith Lutheran Church is located in the town of Faith, Rowan County. 

A group of Lutherans living at Faith asked the Southern Conference, 
at a meeting in China Grove, in the fall of 1898 to send a minister to 
organize a church in their community. The Rev. R. L. Brown was asked 
to answer their request, and on March 26, 1899, he organized a congre- 
gation with fourteen members enrolled that day. Two weeks later, 
on April 9th, nine others were enrolled, making a charter membership 
of twenty-three. Officers were elected as follows: H. M. L. Anger, G. 
W. Hoffner, W. M. Foil, and H. W. Cauble. A Building Committee was 
appointed composed of H. M. L. Agner, W. S. Earnhardt, and D. A. 
Wiley. Mr. and Mrs. D. A. Wiley gave the lot for the church, and ser- 
vices were held there during the summer under a brush arbor. A frame 
building about 28 x 50 feet was started in 1899 and completed early in 
the next year. The cornerstone was laid February 17, 1900, by Rev. C. 
E. Miller, president of Synod; and Rev. R. L. Brown, the pastor. The 
church was dedicated October 5, 1902, by Dr. R. C. Holland, then presi- 



200 History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 

dent, and student C. P. Fisher who was to become the first regular pastor 
after graduation the next spring. 

Faith and Emmanuel churches were in a parish together during 
the entire time when Rev. Fisher was pastor, 1903-1918, but in 1919 
during the pastoral services of Rev. G. O. Ritchie Faith became self- 
sustaining. 

The congregation built a parsonage in 1905, located about two 
blocks from the church. Transepts were built to the church while Pastor 
Fisher was with them. 

During the pastoral service of Rev. John L. Morgan plans were 
begun for the erection of a new church. So offerings for a building 
fund were started on April 14, 1935, when $29.60 was received as the 
first offering for this purpose. However it was under the pastoral leader- 
ship of Rev. C. N. Yount that the plans for the new church were per- 
fected and carried out. The ground-breaking services were held Janu- 
ary 16, 1949, by Dr. V. R. Cromer, president of Synod, Dr. J. L. Morgan, 
president emeritus, Pastor Yount and others. The opening services in 
the completed church were held February 11, 1951. However services 
were held in the auditorium of the first floor beginning July 16, 1950, 
until the building was completed. The cornerstone was laid on the day 
VA'hen the first services were held on February 11, 1951, Dr. F. L. Conrad, 
president of Synod, Dr. J. L. Morgan, and Pastor Yount officiating. 

This is one of the best and most churchly houses of worship in 
the Synod. It has a full basement and a large educational annex at 
the back of the main church. The entire plant completely furnished 
represents a cost of approximately $200,000.00. The pipe organ is a 
gift of the Raney Brothers in memory of their parents, Mr. and Mrs. 
R. A. Raney. 

List of Pastors: 

R. L. Brown, 1899-1901 G. O. Ritchie, 1918-1926 

Student C. P. Fisher, 1902 L. E. Blackwelder, 1927-1933 

V. Y. Boozer, Supply, 1902-1903 John L. Morgan, 1934-1936 

C. P. Fisher, 1903-1918 C. N. Yount, 1936- 



FIRST CHURCH. ALBEMARLE 

The First Lutheran Church in Albemarle is located right in the 
central part of that city. Its first location was on South First Street, 
just west one block from the present church. 

Work was begun here in 1879 by Rev. Whitson Kimball, who 
was authorized by Synod that year to investigate the possibilities for 
a Lutheran church in that place. A congregation was organized Sep- 
tember 19, 1880, with five charter members — Mrs. L. C. Lilly, Mrs. Jose- 



History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 201 

phine Hearne, Mrs. Elizabeth Heilig Betts, Mr. J. W. Bostian, and Mr. 
S. H. Hearne. Mr. Bostian was elected Elder, and Mr. Hearne was 
elected Deacon of the church. 

That same year, a lot was donated by Mrs. L. C. Lilly, and a 
frame house of worship was soon erected on it, which was dedicated 
on the third Sunday in August 1881. 

The congregation became self-supporting as to pastor's salary in 
1905. By 1907 it had grown to where it was necessary to provide for 
a larger building. On July 1, 1907, Rev. H. A. McCullough became 
pastor and soon a new location was secured on the corner of Second 
and South Streets for $2,500.00 and a new brick church was erected on 
it. The cornerstone was laid July 2, 1908, and the name of the church 
was changed from that of the Albemarle Lutheran Church to the First 
Lutheran Church of Albemarle. The cost of the new church was ap- 
proximately $20,000.00. There is a basement in the church for Sunday 
School work, and other activities. 

In 1912, while Rev. V. C. Ridenhour, D.D., was pastor, a new brick 
parsonage was built, just back of the church, on South Street. This 
parsonage has more recently been remodeled and made into an ideal 
home for the pastor. The remaining debt for the church building was 
paid off under Pastor Ridenhour's leadership, and the church was 
dedicated October 17, 1915, by Pastor Ridenhour, assisted by Dr. H. A. 
McCullough. 

In 1929, Mr. J. S. Efird, a leading member of the congregation, 
gave the church a lot, adjoining the north side of the church property, 
on which to build an Educational Building. The building was put up 
during 1930-1931, under the pastoral supervision of Dr. G. H. Rhodes, 
at a cost of approximately $60,000.00. 

In 1951 the main church building was completely renovated and 
redecorated, under the pastoral supervision of Pastor J. White Iddings, 
at a cost of $30,000.00. At the same time, a three manual pipe organ 
was installed, which was given by Mrs. W. H. Morrow as a memorial 
to her parents, Mr. and Mrs. John S. Efird. 

Although this church was begun with only five members, it has 
become one of the strongest congregations in the North Carolina Synod, 
with an outlook for continued expansion. 

List of Pastors: 
Whitson Kimball, 1880-1882 Vacant, 1897 

G. F. Schaeffer, 1883-1884 W. Kimball, 1898 

A. D. L. Moser, 1884-1886 P. L. Miller, 1898-1901 
J. A. Linn, 1887-1888 C. B. Miller, 1901-1902 
J. H. Wyse, 1889 A. R. Beck, 1903-1904 

J. A. Linn, Sup., 1890 G. H. Cox, Sup., 1904-1905 

B. S. Brown, 1892-1896 R. R. Sowers, 1905-1906 



202 History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 

G. H. Cox, Sup., 1906-1907 L. E. Blackwelder, S, 1925-1926 

H. A. McCullough, 1907-1911 G. H. Rhodes, 1927-1948 

V. C. Ridenhour, 1912-1923 J. W. Iddings, 1949- 
E. C. Cooper, 1923-1925 



FIRST CHURCH, GREENSBORO 

The First Lutheran Church in Greensboro is located on West 
Market Street, near the central part of the city. The original location, 
however, was on Ashe Street near Walker Avenue. 

Work leading up to the formation of this church was begun 
during the summer of 1907 by Rev. J. L. Morgan, then Field Missionary 
of the North Carolina Synod. The first worship service was held Octo- 
ber 27, 1907, in the Y.W.C.A. rooms on West Market Street with twenty- 
three in attendance. Mrs. J. J. Stone played the piano for the services. 
Arrangements were made for services every first, third, and fourth Sun- 
day afternoons. Pastor Morgan preached at High Point and other 
mission places at the morning hours. 

After meeting for some Sundays in the Y.W.C.A. rooms, arrange- 
ments were made to hold services in the Christian Church on Walker 
Avenue. It was in this church that the congregation was formally 
organized on Sunday, September 27, 1908, with twenty-one members, 
by Missionary J. L. Morgan. 

Pastor Morgan continued to serve the congregation until October 
1, 1909, when he, having completed the new church in High Point, 
moved to Mooresville to take up a new mission point. Rev. M. L. 
Canup was called as pastor at High Point and supplied Greensboro 
after Pastor Morgan left. 

Then in 1910 Rev. J. E. Schenck was called as fulltime pastor at 
Greensboro. Soon after he accepted the call, a lot for a church was 
purchased on Ashe Street containing a frame dwelling house. The 
property cost $4,000.00 and was largely paid for by the Home Mission 
Board of the United Synod in the South. 

In 1911 a brick church was built at a cost of $12,500.00, toward 
which the Women's Missionary Society of the North Carolina Synod 
contributed $6,000.00. The balance of the cost was carried by the 
congregation under the pastoral leadership of Rev. E. A. Shenk and 
was fully paid off in 1944 after Rev. S. L. Sox became pastor. The 
church was dedicated, free of debt, October 22, 1944, by Pastor Sox 
and President J. L. Morgan. 

Meanwhile, soon after Rev. C. E. Fritz became pastor in 1935, 
the congregation purchased a house and lot by the west side of the 
church for parsonage purposes. But in 1943 the building was converted 



History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 203 

into a service center, and a new parsonage purchased at 404 Aycock 
Street for $6,000.00, which is still occupied by Pastor Sox and his family. 

In 1945 a large lot was purchased on West Market Street for 
$8,000.00 on which to build a new church. The lot was soon paid 
for, but the high cost of building delayed construction. Then, in 
1951, the First Baptist Church building, on West Market, was offered 
for sale, and the First Lutheran Church purchased it for $105,000.00, 
which will provide room for all their needs for many years. It is a 
brick and stone building. First service was held February 15, 1953. 

List of Pastors: 
J. L. Morgan, 1907-1909 Student supply, 1917-1918 

M. L. Canup, 1909-1910 E. A. Shenk, 1918-1935 

J. E. Schenk, 1910-1915 C. E. Fritz, 1935-1939 

F. B. Lingle, Sup., 1915-1916 J. A. Ritchie, Sup., 1939-1940 

E. L. Folk, 1916-1917 S. L. Sox, 1940- 



FIRST CHURCH, LEXINGTON 

The First Lutheran Church in Lexington is located on 318 South 
State Street. 

This work was started by Dr. E. Fulenwider in 1904, who was 
Field Missionary at that time. The church was organized June 30, 1905, 
with 16 members by Pastor Fulenwider. 

The lot on State Street was purchased, and a building was 
soon started. The cornerstone of the church was laid June 8, 1906, by 
Rev. G. H. Cox, D.D., then President of Synod, and Pastor Fulenwider. 
The church was fortunate in having the liberal support of Mr. C. M. 
Thompson, a loyal member of the congregation, and the fine coopera- 
tion of the entire group. 

The church was opened for its first service November 25, 1906, 
with the sermon by the pastor. A Sunday School was begun December 
9, that same year, with 37 members. On February 1, 1907, Dr. Fulen- 
wider became fulltime pastor of the congregation and continued so 
until March 1, 1908, when he was called to the College Church at 
Newberry, S. C. 

A parsonage was built on the lot by the side of the church in 
1907. This was replaced, however, by the present new one in 1940, 
under Rev. C. R. Ritchie's supervision. 

The church was dedicated, free of debt, December 31, 1909, by 
Rev. V. Y. Boozer, D.D., who was at that time pastor hjere and also 
President of Synod, assisted by Dr. M. M. Kinard. In 1926 a two-story 
brick Educational Building was constructed, under the pastoral direc- 
tion of Rev. B. S. Brown, Jr., D.D., at a cost of $5,500.00. 



204 History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 

Rev. C. Ross Ritchie was given a leave of absence from August 
12, 1942, to February 10, 1946, to serve as chaplain in World War II. 
Dr. J. C. Dietz and Rev. W. T. Nau, Ph.D., supplied the congregation 
during that time. Rev. M. R. Farris became pastor May 1, 1951. 

List of Pastors: 
E. Fulenwider, 1904-1908 C. R. Ritchie, 1939-1942 

G. W. Spiggle, 1909 J. C. Dietz, 1942-1944 

V. Y. Boozer, 1909-1916 W. T. Nau, 1944-1946 

P. J. Bame, 1917-1924 C. R. Ritchie, 1946-1950 

B. S. Brown, Jr., 1924-1939 M. R. Farris, 1951- 



FRIEDENS, GIBSONVILLE 

Friedens Church is located in Guilford County, about three miles 
west of the town of Gibsonville. It is one of the oldest Lutheran 
churches in North Carolina; however, the date of its organization is 
not definitely known. Historians tell us that German immigrants 
began to settle in that section as early as 1740, or earlier. These Ger- 
man settlers were lovers of their church. Some of them were Lutherans 
while others were German Reformed. Dr. R. D. W. Connor, in his Three 
Volume History of North Carolina, Volume I, page 159; says that there 
was a Lutheran church on Haw River as far back as 1745, which would 
have had to be Friedens or Lows, or maybe St. Paul's, all of which are 
located not too far from Haw River or its tributaries. Letting that be as 
it may, the organizational date carried by the congregation is 1745. 
It is interesting to note here that Walter Whitaker, in his Centennial 
History of Alamance County, makes this statement: "Two miles north- 
west of Gibsonville stands Friedens Evangelical Lutheran Church which 
was founded as a union Lutheran and Reformed meeting house about 
1744." Then W. T. Whitsett, who lived in that community all his 
life, and was a member of Friedens Church, says: "While the early 
records are lost, it is believed that the first rude building was erected 
as early as 1744, but a reorganization took place in 1771 and a second 
house of worship was built at that time and so the latter date has 
been used." Grave stones carry dates as far back as 1751, and there 
are others whose writing has worn away, which may be even older. 

At the first, Friedens owned its property jointly with the Re- 
formed Church; however, after the Revolutionary War the Reformed 
congregation was without a pastor so long that it became only a 
nominal organization. Then in 1857 they withdrew and built a church 
of their own which is called St. Mark's. 

Friedens' first building was of unhewn logs, and stood where the 
old graveyard now is, and is supposed to have been built in 1744. 
The second building was a frame structure, on the same grounds as 



History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 



205 



the first, and was built in 1771. It was 45 x 60 feet in dimensions, 
two stories high, and had a high pulpit. The third house of worship 
was erected in 1869, which was of brick and was on land across the 
road from the old church, which had been purchased for that purpose in 
1854. In 1928, an eight-room annex was added to this building for 
Sunday School purposes. Unfortunately the entire building was de- 
stroyed by fire on January 8, 1939, but in one year's time a new build - 




Friedens Lutheran Church 
GiBSONviLLE, North Carolina 



ing was erected on the same grounds and was dedicated, free of debt, 
on April 21, 1940. Rev. John L. Morgan was pastor at that time, and 
rendered fine service in rebuilding. 

Friedens was all the while associated with one or more neigh- 
boring Lutheran congregations in a parish until 1950, when it became 
a parish in itself alone. For a while she owned a parsonage in co- 
operation with St. Paul's in Gibsonville, but she later bought St. Paul's 
part, and since becoming self-supporting she has now built a new 
parsonage, about half way between Gibsonville and the church. 



206 



History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 



Although Friedens began her work at a very early date, she did 
not secure a grant for the fourteen acres of land on which her first 
church was built until the year 1797. Later on, other small tracts were 
purchased in addition to the original grant. 

Friedens, like many of the other old churches, was organized 
and developed for many years by the laity of the church, without 
pastoral leadership. There were no Lutheran ministers residing in 
North Carolina prior to 1773. Rev. Samuel Suther, a Reformed minister, 
served his people in that vicinity during 1771 and the year following 
and preached to Lutherans, as well as to the Reformed, as he found 
opportunity. 

Rev. George Soelle, a Dane, who was ordained as a Lutheran 
minister in Denmark, in the year 1741, and later came to this country 
and worked with the Moravians, repeatedly visited the Friedens com- 
munity and preached for the different Lutheran congregations, but he 
never lived in that section. 

The first Lutheran minister that visited the Guilford area in an 
official capacity was the Rev, Adolph Nussmann. He came to this 
county in 1773, and located first in Rowan County, and then in 1774 
moved to Cabarrus County. From there he made repeated trips, on 
horseback, to Guilford and other sections and ministered to the various 
congregations. Pastor Nussmann was followed by Rev. J. G. Arends, 
who likewise lived first in Rowan and then in Lincoln County, 



List of Pastors: 



Adolph Nussman, Supervisor, 

1774-1789 
J. G. Arends, Visitor, 1775-1785 

C. E. Bernhardt, 1789-1800 
Philip Henkel, 1800-1805 
J. L. Markert, 1805-1810 

J. Scherer 1810-1828 

D. J. Hauer, 1828-1829 
W. A. Artz, 1830-1852 

J. Grieson, Asst., 1834-1839 
S. Scherer, 1854-1858 
J. D. Scheck, 1859-1864 
L. C. Groseclose, Sup., 1865-1866 
S. Rothrock, Supply, 1867-1868 
C. H. Bernheim, 1868-1872 
S. Scherer, 1873-1876 
W, Kimball, 1877-1880 



J. L. Buck, 1881-1888 
C. B. Miller, 1890-1892 
J. R. Sikes, 1893-1895 

E. P. Parker, 1895-1900 
C, A, Brown, 1901-1904 

G. H. L. Lingle, 1904-1906 

F. M. Harr, 1906-1909 
C. J. Sox, 1910-1913 

W. G. Cobb, Sup., 1913 
B. S. Dasher, 1913-1915 
y. Von A. Riser, 1916-1920 

G. W. McClanahan, 1921-1931 
E. H. Kite, 1931-1935 

John L. Morgan, 1936-1943 
M. R. Farris, 1943-1951 
K. J. Beam, 1952- 



History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 207 



FRIENDSHIP, ALEXANDER CO. 

Friendship Ciiurch is located in Alexander County, seven miles 
southwest from Taylorsville. The date given in the Minutes of Synod 
for the organization of this church is 1833. However, it may be older 
than that date, forasmuch as a lot had already been selected and a 
meeting house placed upon it. Also, church officers had been elected 
and a pastor called prior to that date. 

The first pastor here wa^ Rev. Adam Miller, Jr., and the first 
officers were Lewis Hafer, Samuel Bowman, Daniel Fry, and George 
Deal. Until 1847 this church was in Burke County, then the county 
line was changed, and Friendship was included in the newly formed 
Alexander County. 

The first "Meeting House" was a small log building, with a 
gallery for slaves. The congregation became a member of the Ten- 
nessee Synod, and their first lay delegate to that body was Michael 
Friday, in the year 1835. 

On December 22, 1858, a one- acre lot, across the road from the 
old church, was purchased on which to erect a new and larger house 
of worship. A frame building, octagon in shape, was built of the best 
of lumber, and is still in regular use. It was dedicated May 21, 1859, 
by the Pastor, P. C. Henkel. In 1933, their centennial year, an eight- 
room annex for Sunday School purposes was added and new pews in- 
stalled. The interior of the church was completely renovated in the 
year 1945. 

Through the years Friendship has been associated in parishes 
with St. Peter's, St. Paul's, St. Stephen's, St. Luke's, St. John's, and 
Shiloh congregations. From 1920 to 1947 she was with St. John's and 
Shiloh, with a parsonage jointly owned in Taylorsville. 

In 1947 the old parsonage was sold and a new home built near 
the church. In the same year Rev. C. F. Kyles was called to full time 
service in Friendship alone. In 1948 a new Minshall Estey Electric 
Organ was installed. 

Seventy young men went out of Friendship congregation into 
World War II, five of whom paid the supreme sacrifice. They were: 
Fred C. Fox, Raymond Isenhour, Rayford D. Bowman, Marvin Stafford, 
and Thomas Edsel Jenkins. 

The congregation has purchased a passenger bus in which to 
convey people to and from Sunday School and church services. 

List of Pastors: 
Adam Miller, Jr., 1833-1842 Timothy Moser, 1862-1867 

C. G. Reitzel, 1842-1844 J. M. Smith, 1867-1877 

J. R. Moser, 1844-1845 P. C. Henkel, 1877-1886 

P. C. Henkel, 1847-1861 D. J. Settlemyre, 1886-1887 



208 



History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 



C. H. Bernheim, 1887-1889 
A. L. Crouse, 1890-1891 
J. P. Miller, 1891-1893 
G. E. Long, 1893-1896 
A. L. Crouse, 1897-1905 
J. C. Moser, 1906-1907 
J. A. Yount, 1907-1909 
A. L. Bolick, 1909-1912 
J. A. Yount, 1912-1918 
J. P. Price, Sup., 1919 
J. A. Yount, 1920-1924 



M. L. Pence, 1924-1926 
E. J. Sox, Sup., 1926-1927 
C. E. Lutz, 1927-1931 
E. J. Sox, Sup., 1931 
L. P. Boland, 1932-1940 

C. W. Harbinson, 1940-1943 
Albert Reiser, S., 1943-1944 
H. B. Leonard, 1944-1946 

D. P. Rudisill, Sup., 1946-47 
W. T. Nau., Sup., 1946-1947 
C. F. Kyles, 1947- 



GOOD HOPE, HICKORY 

Good Hope Lutheran Church is located in the eastern suburbs of 
Hickory. This work was begun as a Sunday School in a small frame 
house south of the railroad, near the Highland Cordage Mills. 

Ministerial students from Lenoir Rhyne College assisted in this 
work. On July 1, 1923, a congregation was organized with 35 members. 

After finishing his school work, Rev. C. K. Wise, who had worked 
here as a student, was called as regular pastor of this mission, 1924-1932. 
During his pastorate a new Sunday School building was erected. This 
entailed a considerable debt, which was paid off in yearly installments. 
Rev. J. C. Deitz, D.D., who was pastor here 1932-1936, deserves credit 
for paying off the greater part of this debt; however, it was not paid in 
full until after Rev. P. L. Miller became pastor. 

For some years Good Hope was in a parish with St. Paul's Church 
at Startown, but on February 20, 1944, the congregation voted to become 
self-sustaining June 1 that year. 

On December 15, 1946, the congregation, under the leadership of 
Pastor Paul L. Miller, voted to purchase a two-acre lot on Highway 70-A 
out of Hickory, at a cost of $3,700.00, for a new church. The old church 
was sold to the Highland Cordage Company for $5,000.00 to which the 
company added $5,000.00 as a donation. 

A consecration service for the new site was held October 21, 1947, 
by Pastor Miller and the congregation. Work was begun on the 
new building the last week in October. The cornerstone was laid July 4. 
1948, by Dr. V. R. Cromer, then President of Synod, and Pastor Miller. 
The building was completed November 1, 1948. The total cost of 
the church and furnishings was about $52,000. It has a seating capacity 
of about 400, with full basement for Sunday School and other needs. 



History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 209 

On April 10, 1949, a new Hammond organ, the gift of Mr. and Mrs. A. D. 
Ecl^ard, was dedicated. 

List of Pastors: 
Rev. C. K. Wise, Sup., 1923-1924 Rev. J. C. Deitz, 1932-1936 

Rev. C. K Wise, 1924-1932 Rev. P. L. Miller, 1936- 



GOOD SHEPHERD, BREVARD 

This field was surveyed by the Board of American Missions and 
was approved for occupancy the early part of 1950. 

On September 1, 1950, Rev. David F. Cooper was called here as 
mission developer, under the direction of the Board of American Missions. 
The old Presbyterian Church and parsonage has been purchased for 
$26,000.00 for which the Board of American Missions loaned the congre- 
gation $16,000.00, and the Loan and Gift Fund of the Brotherhood 
helped liberally on the balance needed. 

The church was organized October 21, 1951, under the guidance of 
Pastor Cooper and Dr. F. L. Conrad, President of Synod, with 52 members. 

List of Pastors: 
Rev. David F. Cooper, 1950- 



GOOD SHEPHERD, GOLDSBORO 

Good Shepherd Lutheran Church in Goldsboro is located on the 
corner of Mulberry and Herman Streets. 

This work was started in 1936, when Rev. W. H. Hiller, a retired 
Lutheran minister living in Goldsboro, began holding services in the 
County Court House. Due to impaired health, Pastor Hiller was not 
able to continue the services very long. Rev. C. E. Norman of Raleigh 
was requested by Synod to continue the work until more permanent 
arrangements could be made. 

In 1938 Rev. J. K. Lasley was called as regular pastor and took 
charge on June 17 that year. Services were now held in the Palace 
Funeral Home. The church was organized, however, in St. James 
Episcopal Church on March 12, 1939, with 50 members. Pastor Lasley was 
in charge of the services and President J. L. Morgan preached the 
sermon. 

The lot for the church was purchased July 1, 1939, for $2,150.00, 
on a fifty-fifty basis, by the mission and the Synod. 



210 History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 

Groundbreaking services were held on March 25, 1940, and the 
completed church was opened for services on September 8, 1940. The 
cornerstone service was held in connection with the opening program. 
These services were under the direction of Pastor Lasley, assisted by 
Dr. F. L. Conrad, and President J. L. Morgan. The building represents 
a cost of $11,500.00. 

This was an instance in which the mission congregation, the 
Missionary Society, the Brotherhood, the Luther League, and the Synod, 
all cooperated in providing the money for the building. It worked 
beautifully. The Board of American Missions helped on the pastor's 
salary. i ' 

The church was dedicated October 17, 1943, by the pastor and the 
officers of Synod. 

Rev. Leroy C. Trexler became pastor here October 9, 1945. Under 
his direction a new brick parsonage was built in 1946 at a cost of $8,500.00. 

Rev. Paul L. Morgan took charge here December 1, 1949. During 
his ministry the debt on the parsonage was paid off in full, and a new 
pipe organ was purchased and paid for when installed. Rev. H. M. 
Yoder became pastor August 22, 1952. 

List of Pastors: 

Rev. W. H. Hiller, 1936- Rev. L. C. Trexler, 1945-1949 

Rev. C. E. Norman, S., 1937- Rev. P. L. Morgan, 1949-1952 

Rev. J. K. Lasley, 1938-1945 Rev. H. M. Yoder, 1952- 



GOOD SHEPHERD, MT. HOLLY 

The Lutheran Church of the Good Shepherd is located in Gaston 
County on South Main Street in Mt. Holly, N. C. 

The church was organized in the spring of 1881. In that year 
a subscription pledge was signed by thirteen persons for a new church. 
Probably the first services were held by Rev. J. R. Peterson. Rev. Junius 
B. Fox became the first regular pastor in August 1882 and served until 
January 1884, at which time Rev. J. R. Peterson took charge and served 
until March 13, 1892. It was in the latter part of 1881 that the first 
church building was erected. This was a frame building, located on a 
lot given by Mr. A. P. Rhyne. This frame building was used by the 
different denominations in the town, each using a particular Sunday 
for services. This continued until 1903 when each denomination made 
provisions for its own work. At that time the frame building was torn 
down to give place for the erection of the brick building that is still in 
use with some additions. 

Rev. John F. Moser served as pastor from 1892 to 1897. Rev. W. J. 
Boger succeeded him, taking charge June 8, 1897, and served Good Shep- 



History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 211 

herd and Lutheran Chapel which were in a charge together until 
November 12, 1909. In the year 1903, under the leadership of Pastor 
Boger, the brick church was built. From 1909 until January 1, 1913, 
Pastor Boger served Good Shepherd as fulltime pastor. 

Rev. E. H. Kohn, Ph.D., D.D., was pastor here from July 1, 1913. 
until July 31, 1946, a total of thirty-three years. A parsonage was pur- 
chased in 1913. In 1916 the church was remodeled, and some additions 
were made to it, and art glass windows and a pipe organ were in- 
stalled. A rededication service for the remodeled church, and the 
consecration of the new equipment, were conducted on June 23, 1921, 
by Dr. J. L. Morgan, as President of Synod, and Dr. E. H. Kohn, pastor. 

Rev. Carl H. Fisher became pastor here November 1, 1946. In the 
year 1948, a new Sunday School building with two auditoriums, thirteen 
class rooms, a ladies parlor, choir robing room, and a kitchen were added 
at a cost of $45,240.00. In 1952 the interior of the church was re- 
decorated and new carpet put down, altar, pulpit, lectern, baptismal 
font, pews, and lighting fixtures installed, and other improvements 
made, all at a cost of $14,620.00. These improvements add greatly to 
the appearance and serviceableness of the church building. 

List of Pastors: 
J. B. Fox, 1882-1884 W. J. Boger, 1897-1913 

J. R. Peterson, 1884-1892 E. H. Kohn, 1913-1946 

J. F. Moser, 1892-1897 C. H. Fisher, 1946- 



GRACE, BESSEMER CITY 

Grace Lutheran Church in Bessemer City, Gaston County, N. C. 
is located on the corner of Maryland Avenue and North Fourteenth 
Street. 

The church was organized with 19 members, in the year 1903, by 
Rev. C. I. Morgan. The first church was located on the corner of Wash- 
ington Avenue and Eleventh Street, where a lot was purchased, and in 
1904 a frame church, 30 x 56 feet, was built at an approximate cost 
of $1,000.00. Sunday School rooms were added in 1939, while Rev. G. W. 
McClanahan was pastor there. From its organization up until 1926 this 
church was in pastoral connection with Holy Trinity Church in Gastonia, 
except for two years when it was with Lutheran Chapel. It was then 
with Shelby for twelve years, but in 1938 this congregation called a 
pastor for fulltime work in that one congregation. 

The pasonage was built while Rev. N. D. Yount was pastor, about 
1926. 

For a few years, plans were in the making for a new church, so in 
1949 a new location was secured and on November 26, 1950, the corner- 
stone of the new brick house of worship was laid. The service was 
by President F. L. Conrad and the pastor, Rev. J. Paul Rimmer. The 



212 History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 

church was completed and on November 5, 1951, was opened for divine 
services. The building and furnishings cost $65,000.00. 

List of Pastors: 
C. I. Morgan, 1903-1905 J. L. Yost, 1923-1924 

John Hall, 1906-1912 N. D. Yount, 1925-1937 

M. A. Ashby, 1912- G. W. McClanahan, 1938-1947 

L. L. Huffman, 1913-1914 J. P. Rimmer, 1948-1952 

J. C. Dietz, 1915-1923 H. P. Barringer, 1952- 

GRACE LUTHERAN CHURCH, BOONE 

Grace Lutheran Church is located in the town of Boone, the County 
Seat of Watauga County, at the intersection of the Blowing Rock and 
Boone Highways. The history of this congregation dates back several 
years prior to the organization of the congregation, during which time 
services were held at different places in the town. The congregation 
was formally organized in 1925 by Rev. H. W. Jeffcoat, who was then 
pastor of the Watauga Mission, under the direction of President J. L. 
Morgan, with twenty -six members. 

A lot for a church was purchased here several years prior to 
the organization of a church, by a number of interested Lutheran 
laymen in Kings Mountain and in Cherryville, who held the property 
until it was needed. This lot was, however, taken over by the city 
for public school purposes at a consideration of $2,000.00. A second lot 
was purchased with the proceeds from the sale of the first one, one 
block back of the Boone Hotel, but it was later disposed of, and the 
money for it was used to pay for the lot the church now owns. The 
present lot was purchased about 1927, when the Synod advanced the 
money for it, until the congregation could sell the one near the hotel. 

With the generous help of the Women of the United Lutheran 
Church in the sum of $13,000.00, the congregation managed to erect its 
brick church and parsonage, for which both labor and material, as well 
as money, were donated, by members and interested friends. 

The cornerstone of the church was laid on Thanksgiving Day, 1928, 
by the pastor. Rev. J. A. Yount, and Dr. H. B. Schaeffer preached the 
sermon for the occasion. The completed building was opened for 
divine services on May 26, 1929, and was dedicated the same day by 
Dr. J. L. Morgan, President of Synod. Pastor Yount was in charge of 
the liturgical services, and Rev. F. F. Fry, D.D., then Executive Secretary 
of the Board of American Missions, preached the sermon. The parsonage 
is located on a part of the church lot. 

This congregation has enjoyed splendid growth under the pastoral 
leadership of Rev. E. F. Troutman, and will have the full time of 
its pastor by 1953, who also serves as student pastor in Appalachian 
Training School in Boone. 

List of Pastors: 

Rev. H. W. Jeffcoat, 1925-1926 Rev. E. F. Troutman, 1938- 

Rev. J. A. Yount, 1926-1937 



History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 213 



GRACE CHURCH, CATAWBA COUNTY 

Grace Church is located in Catawba County, about eight miles 
west of Newton. German families settled in that section in consider- 
able numbers prior to and following the Revolutionary War, but they 
had no church. Then, on January 14, 1797, Samuel Jarrett, a Lutheran, 
sold three acres of land to John Yoder and John Hoffner, trustees, for the 
Lutheran and Reformed congregations for church purposes for $8.00. 

The congregation was organized that same year, by Rev. J. G. 
Arends, or it could have been organized earlier, for as much as trustees 
were elected already for the two congregations. 

The first house of worship was a two-story log building 24x30 
feet in dimensions. The walls were put up and a roof put over it in 
1797 and it was used that way for about two years before it was 
completed. 

The second building was of brick, which was built in the year 
1858, during the pastoral leadership of Rev. A. J. Fox, at a cost of 
$1,400.00. This, like the log church, was jointly owned and used by 
both Lutheran and Reformed congregations. This church was used 
jointly until 1941, when, under the leadership of Rev. B. S. Brown, Jr., 
the two groups mutually agreed that each should have its own fulltime 
house of worship. The Reformed brethren received the old church, and 
the Lutherans accepted vacant land across the highway as their part. 
The graveyard is held jointly by both congregations. 

In 1941 the Lutheran congregation, with Rev. B. S. Brown, Jr.. 
pastor, began to build a new brick church with basement, and all 
modern equipment was installed. The church was completed in 1942, 
and on Easter of that year the first service was held in it. It was dedicated, 
free of debt, June 6, 1943. On March 7, 1948, this building was totally 
destroyed by fire. But the congregation, guided by Pastor Hoke Ritchie, 
set to work building a new church the same year, which was completed 
in 1950. The new building is similar to the one that burned, with some 
additions. On September 16, 1951, the cornerstone was formally laid, 
and the church dedicated. 

Grace Church was first served by Rev. J. G. Arends, from about 
1797 to 1807, as often as he could do so. Following Rev. Arends, Rev. 
Philip Henkel served the church for some years. However, for many 
years up to about 1827, only occasional services were held for lack 
of a preacher. Then, about 1827, Rev. Henry Graeber, of the North 
Carolina Synod, came and effected a reorganized group of a small num- 
ber which he served for a few years, but when he left they were again 
without a pastor, which was discouraging. Many of them moved to 
other Lutheran congregations. Then about 1835 Rev. Adam Miller, Jr., 
of the Tennessee Synod, was called, who revived the congregation 
and served it until about 1846, when he left the Tennessee Synod. How- 
ever, the congregation remained in the Synod. 

Grace congregation was for many years in a parish with Daniel's 
Church, but during a period of vacancy in 1952, the two churches decided 



214 History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 

that each should have a fulltime pastor. So Grace congregation built 
a nice eight-room parsonage on their church lot, and called Rev. H. L. 
Gruber as their first fulltime minister. 

List of Pastors: 

J. G. Arends, 1785-1807 M. L. Pence, 1896-1899 

Philip Henkel, Asst, 1805-1807 J. P. Price, 1900-1906 

Philip Henkel, 1808-1814 L. L. Lohr, 1908-1923 

Henry Goodman, 1827-1831 R. M. Carpenter, 1923-1925 

Adam Miller, Jr., 1835-1846 W. H. Roof, 1925-1939 

P. C. Henkel, 1847-1854 B. S. Brown, Jr., 1939-1946 

A. J. Fox, 1855-1884 John Hall, Sup., 1946 

R. a. Yoder, 1884-1895 H. H. Ritchie, 1946-1951 

E. J. Sox, 1895-1896 H. L. Gruber, 1952- 



GRACE. HENDERSONVILLE 

Grace Lutheran Church in Hendersonville is located at the corner of 
Seventh Avenue and Church Street. 

Rev. J. H. Wannemacher, chairman of the Mission Committee of the 
Tennessee Synod, visited Hendersonville in 1914 and inquired as to the 
needs for a Lutheran Church there. A small number of Lutherans were 
found, and occasional services were thereafter held by visiting ministers, 
among whom were Rev. M. L. Stirewalt, Student M. M. Kipps, Student 
Muller Wingard, and others. Rev. F. G. Morgan was in charge of the 
mission during part of the time in 1915-1916. Dr. C. L. Miller supplied 
them for a while in 1916. 

It appears that the church was formally organized on September 3, 
1916, with fifteen members by Rev. R. S. Patterson, Superintendent of 
Home Missions in the United Synod, South. Due to war conditions affect- 
ing our country, and a shortage of available ministers, the next four 
years turned out to be a period of waiting with intermittent supply 
preaching in various buildings, the last place being the high school 
building. 

At long last, a regular resident pastor was secured in the person of 
Rev. J. D. Mauney, April 1921, who found a congregation of fourteen 
members to welcome his coming. 

With the assistance of friends, a lot was purchased on August 8, 
1921, at a cost of $5,000.00, and a building fund amounting to $25,000.00 
or more was donated by the Mauney family — in memory of David and 
Fannie Mauney — and soon a new brick church was under construction. 
The cornerstone was laid on August 17, 1924, by President J. L. Morgan, 
assisted by Rev. E. Fulenwider, D.D., Rev. W. H. Greever, D.D., and Pastor 
J. D. Mauney. Money for the art windows in the church was given by 
Pastor Mauney's father, Mr. Jacob Mauney, of Kings Mountain, N. C. 



History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 215 

Pastor Mauney resigned May 31, 1928, and for a year or more the 
church was supplied by Student John F. Futchs and others. 

Rev. A. W. Lippard served the congregation 1929-1937, during which 
time good progress was made, both in the organized work and in the 
building improvements. During Rev. J. A. Linn's pastorate improve- 
ments were made on the basement and the balance of the debt on the 
church was paid off, and the church dedicated August 22, 1943, by Pastor 
Linn and the President of Synod. 

In 1949, while Rev. W. F. Hook was pastor, the basement was 
redesigned and newly equipped for educational purposes. The debt for 
this educational unit is about paid off. An attractive sign for the front 
lawn has been purchased. 

List of Pastors: 

J. H. Wannemacher and R. S. J. F. Futchs, Sup., 1928- 

Patterson, Sup., 1914-1915 A. W. Lippard, 1929-1937 

M. L. Stirewalt, Sup., 1915- J. A. Linn, 1938-1946 

M. M. Kipps, Sup., 1915- J. D. Barringer, 1946-1948 

F. G. Morgan, Sup., 1916- W. F. Hook, 1949-1951 

C. L. Miller, Sup., 1916- J. D. Lindler, 1952- 
J. D. Mauney, 1921-1928 



GRACE, LIBERTY 

Grace Lutheran Church is located in the town of Liberty, in 
Randolph County. Attention was directed to this field for a Lutheran 
Church at a meeting of the Northern Conference in Peace Church, in 
August 1909. As a result of this report. Rev. J. L. Morgan, synodical 
missionary, was authorized to visit Liberty and investigate the situation, 
which he did January 16, 1910. A service was held in the M. E. Church 
and J. S. Patterson, J. Rom Smith, and David Moser were appointed as 
an advisory committee in the matter. Some twenty or more Lutherans 
were found in Liberty at that time. 

On April 2, 1911, Pastor Morgan again visited this field and con- 
ducted services. At this meeting it was arranged for this work to be 
associated in a parish with Raleigh. On July 30, 1911, a congregation 
was organized by Pastor Morgan in the Methodist Protestant Church 
with ten names then enrolled. 

On April 28, 1912, a lot was purchased on the corner of Greens- 
boro and Graham Streets, for $400.00, and plans were worked out for 
a church building. Brick work was begun November 8, 1915, and by 
the end of January 1916, the building was under roof, and by the end 
of August that year it was practically completed, but there was a delay 
in shipment of pews. Services were first held in the church October 1, 
1916, when a Sunday School was organized with thirty-seven in at- 
tendance. Mr. L. H. Smith, Jr., was chosen superintendent. 



216 History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 

About this time Pastor Morgan was called to devote his full time 
to the new church in Raleigh, so Rev. H. W. Jeffcoat was secured to 
carry on the work at Liberty in connection with his parish obligations 
at Richland and other neighboring congregations. 

In the fall of 1921, following the merger of the two Synods, Grace, 
Melanchthon, and Richland congregations formed the Randolph parish. 
Rev. B. A. Barringer was called as their first pastor and began his 
services June 1, 1922. Early in 1950 Grace congregation withdrew 
from the parish in order to have a fulltime pastor of her own. Rev. 
Harold M. Yoder was called to Grace Church alone in 1950. However, 
the Grace pastor cooperated with Melanchthon and Richland in special 
services and in pastoral visits. 

In the year 1929, during the pastorate of Rev. Q. O. Lyerly, a new 
brick parsonage was built by the Liberty or Grace congregation, at a 
cost of $3,500.00. Within the past few years, their church has been 
redecorated and a number of appropriate interior improvements added, 
which give it a worshipful atmosphere. A new brick educational 
unit was added to the church building in 1951. 

List of Pastors: 

J. L. Morgan, 1911-1916 E. A. Schenk, Sup., 1937- 

H. W. Jeffcoat, 1916-1920 C. H. Fisher, 1937-1939 

B. A. Barringer, Sup., 1920-192^ E. A. Shenk, 1939-1941 

B. A. Barringer, 1922-1926 J. C. Dickert, 1941-1946 

P. G. Kinney, Sup., 1926- J. R. Boggs, 1946-1948 

F. P. Cauble, Sup., 1927- R. B. Sigmon, 1949-1950 

Q. O. Lyerly, 1928-1936 H. M. Yoder, 1950-1952 

W. D. Yount, 1936-1937 J. K. Linn, 1952- 



GRACE LUTHERAN CHURCH. ROWAN COUNTY 

Grace Lutheran Church in Rowan County, is located seven miles 
southwest of Salisbury and three miles north of China Grove. This 
church was organized on the second Sunday in May, 1880, with twenty- 
two members by Rev. V. R. Stickley and Rev. J. B. Davis, D.D. The 
organization meeting was held in an old building near Wilhelm's 
graveyard. The name chosen for the new congregation was Grace 
Evangelical Lutheran Church. Officers elected were: J. C. Bernhardt 
and William Lentz, as elders; William Smith and Elijah Miller, as 
deacons; and Capt. J. A. Fisher, as secretary-treasurer. 

Their first house of worship was a frame structure, 35 x 60 feet 
in dimensions. The cornerstone for this building was laid on August 
25, 1880, by Rev. W. A. Lutz. Most of the material for the framing 
was donated by different friends of the new congregation. The building 
was completed without delay, and was dedicated on April 24, 1881, by 
Rev. V. R. Stickley, Rev. J. A. Linn, and Rev. W. A. Lutz. This building 



History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 217 

was remodeled, first in 1923, and again in 1929 when Sunday School 
class rooms were added under the pastoral supervision of Rev. C. A. 
Brown. 

This building was destroyed by fire on Sunday, March 30, 1947, 
but the congregation at once set itself to the task of rebuilding. Labor 
and materials, as well as money, were freely given by the members of 
the congregation, so that the new church was soon completed. This 
is a beautiful brick church, which is fitted out with modern equipment 
for Sunday School and other church activities. The cost of the building 
was around $60,000.00, including a part of the equipment. A consider- 
able amount of labor and material were given without charge, by 
members of the congregation. 

The church was dedicated, free of debt, on Sunday, November 5, 
1949, by President F. L. Conrad, D.D., and their pastor, the Rev. C. S. 
King. 

Back in 1939 a choice lot was donated by Mr. A. M. Miller, one 
of the members of the congregation, on which a brick parsonage was 
built soon thereafter, about which time the congregation decided to 
have a fulltime pastor. 

List of Pastors: 

V. R. Stickley, 1880-1882 R. T. Troutman, 1918-1921 

J. D. Shirey, 1882-1887 J. Arthur Linn, Sup., 1921- 

D. A. Sox, 1887-1888 C. M. Fox, Sup., 1922- 

C. A. Brown, Sup., 1888- C. P. Fisher, Sup., 1922- 

Whitson Kimball, 1889-1892 W. G. Cobb, 1922-1923 

C. A. Brown, 1892-1894 C. P. Fisher, Sup., 1923-1925 

V. Y. Boozer, 1894-1895 C. A. Brown, 1925-1932 

H. N. Miller, 1895-1897 • C. F. Kyles, 1932-1940 

H. A. Trexler, 1897-1907 C. E. Lutz, 1940-1949 

B. S. Brown, Sr., 1908-1911 C. S. King, 1949-1951 

O. W. Aderholdt, 1911-1912 J. E. Walker, 1951- 

G. O. Ritchie, 1913-1918 



GRACE. THOMASVILLE 

Grace Lutheran Church in Thomasville is located on the corner 
of Salem and Guilford Streets in the central part of the city. 

Services were held here occasionally by visiting ministers for a 
few years before the work was formally organized. 

Rev. V. Y. Boozer, D.D., organized the congregation on November 
5, 1911, while he was pastor of the church in Lexington. There were 28 
names enrolled at that service, which was held in the Reformed Church. 

Rev. J. B. Moose was the first regular pastor, who took charge of 
the work in 1917, and served the mission about one year. On September 
15, 1918, Rev. N. D. Bodie was called by Synod as Field Missionary, 



218 History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 

with headquarters in Thomasville, with a view to developing that mission. 
Then, on May 19, 1919, he was called as regular pastor of Grace Church 
in Thomasville. 

On this same date the mission congregation and the Executive 
Committee of Synod purchased from Dr. J. M. Peacock the lot we now 
have on the corner of Salem and Guilford Streets. Soon thereafter work 
on the construction of the new building was under way, and the build- 
ing was opened for divine services on July 2, 1922. Guest speakers were 
Dr. A. D. R. Hancher, Dr. M. L. Stirewalt, and the President of Synod, 
along with the pastor, Rev. N. D. Bodie. The cornerstone for this 
building seems not to have been laid until April 8, 1923. The church 
was dedicated on November 27, 1927, by Rev. G. O. Ritchie, who was 
then pastor there, and President Morgan. 

A large brick parsonage was built near the church in 1930, under 
the pastoral direction of Rev. G. O. Ritchie at a cost of $6,500.00. Then, 
in May 1937, a vacant lot was purchased on Salem Street for $3,500.00 
for recreational and future needs. About this same time new chancel 
funiture was installed in the church, and other improvements were made, 
including a new organ. Rev. C. R. Patterson, pastor. 

Under the guidance of the present pastor, Rev. C. S. Wessinger, 
on August 15, 1950, a new house and lot were purchased for a parsonage, 
and the old parsonage was converted into an Educational plant. The 
new parsonage cost $15,500.00. A series of 15 stained glass windows were 
installed in the church during 1952. 

List of Pastors: 

V. Y. Boozer, Sup., 1911-1915 G. O. Ritchie, 1926-1937 

P. D. Brown, Sup., 1916-1917 E. F. Troutman, 1937-1938 

P. J. Bame, Sup., 1917- G. D. Conrad, Sup., 1938- 

J. B. Moose, 1917-1918 C. R. Patterson, 1938-1947 

N. D. Bodie, 1918-1926 C. L. Miller, Sup., 1947 

C. R. Ritchie, Sup., 1926- C. S. Wessinger, 1947- 



HAVEN, SALISBURY 

Haven Church is located on West Harrison Street in what used to 
be called Chestnut Hill, Salisbury. This church was begun in 1898, 
when some of the Lutheran families then living in that vicinity started 
a Sunday School there. During that fall and winter occasional preach- 
ing services were held by Rev. W. A. Julian, who was then pastor at 
Christ Church, Spencer. 

The church was organized on August 13, 1899, under the pastoral 
direction of Rev. Julian. The name first chosen was Mt. Zion. Rev. 
Julian resigned soon after the church was organized, and Rev. H. W. 
Jeffcoat was called. 



History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 219 

The first church was a frame building and was started in 1900 
and completed in 1901. The cornerstone was laid on January 20, 1901 
by Rev. C. B. Miller, President of Synod, and Pastor Jeffcoat. At that 
time the name was changed to Haven Lutheran Church. Rev. Jeffcoat 
was succeeded as pastor by Rev. J. L. Morgan in 1902. 

The second building was a brick structure, with full basement for 
Sunday School work. The cornerstone for it was laid May 19, 1919 by 
the pastor. Rev. G. H. L. Lingle, and Rev. J. L. Morgan, President of 
Synod. The building was completed in 1920 and was opened for a sunrise 
service on Easter morning. The cost was around $22,000.00. A frame 
parsonage was built by the side of the first church, about 1904, but 
this was removed when the brick church was built and a new brick 
parsonage constructed on a lot purchased for that purpose. 

Two major developments were carried out by Haven Church 
during Rev. C. A. Phillips' pastorate: First, an Educational Building 
was constructed in 1939, which was opened for use August 13 — their 
40th anniversary. Secondly, the church was remodeled and enlarged 
in 1949. A beautiful chancel was built, the interior of the church 
refinished, and the front of the building redesigned. A new corner- 
stone was laid August 17, by President F. L. Conrad, Pastor Phillips, 
Dr. J. L. Morgan, and Mr. H. E. Isenhour, chairman of the committee. 
The church was reopened for services August 14 — their 50th anniversary. 
Dr. A. K. Hewitt accepted a call as pastor here September 1, 1950. 

List of Pastors: 

W. A. Julian, 1899-1900 M. L. Kester, 1912-1913 

H. W. Jeffcoat, 1900-1901 G. H. L. Lingle, 1914-1922 

J. L. Morgan, 1902-1903 G. H. Cooper, 1923-1926 

E. P. Conrad, Sup., 1903 B. J. Wessinger, 1927-1933 

C. L. Miller, 1904-1905 C. A. Phillips, 1933-1949 

C. I. Morgan, 1905-1911 A. K. Hewitt, 1950- 



HOLLY GROVE, DAVIDSON COUNTY 

Holly Grove Church, organized by Rev. W. P. Cline in 1885, is 
located in Davidson County, four miles east of Lexington. The first 
building, a frame structure 30 x 50 two stories, was erected in 1888. The 
upper story was used as a nave and for school purposes. The first 
floor was divided into two school rooms. 

The school, founded by Rev. W. P. Cline with Peter Kepley, Peter 
Younts, Henry Conrad and Haley Myers collaborating, was known as 
Holly Grove Academy, and was directed by the pastor, from its beginning 
in 1888. Many ministers as well as laymen and women caught the thirst 
for learning at Holly Grove Academy. 

The second church building is a brick structure, erected in 1914 
while Rev. J. M. Senter was pastor. It is a splendid building with seating 
capacity for around 350 people. A Sunday School annex was added 



220 History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 

in 1940, while Rev. Roy L. Fislier was pastor. The Holly Grove Parish 
built a frame parsonage in 1886, on a lot just across the road from the 
Holly Grove Church. This was replaced by a large brick building in 
1926, under Rev. R. B. Sigmon's leadership. A heating system was in- 
stalled in it in 1951. This congregation was for many years in a 
parish with Beck's, New Jerusalem, and Lebanon, but it is now with 
New Jerusalem only. 

The Tennessee Synod met in Holly Grove Church in 1888, at which 
time the building was dedicated. 

List of Pastors: 

W. P. Cline, 1885-1893 J. F. Deal, 1910-1911 

Jacob Wike, 1893-1894 J. M. Senter, 1911-1918 

A. R. Beck, 1894-1896 R. B. Sigmon, 1919-1928 

Vacant, 1897- R. L. Fisher, 1928-1942 

C. L. Miller, 1898-1903 C. F. Kyles, 1942-1947 

W. P. Cline, 1904-1905 C. L. Miller, Sup., 1948 

A. L. Bolick, 1906-1909 L. O. Roof, 1948- 



HOLY COMFORTER, BELMONT 

The Lutheran Church of the Holy Comforter is located in the town 
of Belmont, in Gaston County, N. C. 

Services were first held in this place, looking to the establishment 
of a Lutheran Church by Rev. W. J. Boger, D.D., then pastor at Mt. Holly, 
from 1910 to 1913. Services were first held in the Presbyterian Church 
and then in a school building. 

Rev. E. H. Kohn, D.D., Ph.D., succeeded Dr. Boger as pastor. A lot 
for the church was given by the Majestic Mill Company. The church 
was organized January 16, 1917, by Rev. E. H. Kohn as pastor; however, 
the name by which it is now known was not adopted until the following 
December 9. 

Ground was broken for the church building November 20, 1917, 
and the cornerstone was laid April 15, 1918, both of these services were 
in charge of Pastor Kohn. The first service was held in the new church 
on July 14, 1918. This work was carried on by Dr. E. H. Kohn for a 
number of years, with some assistance by students during the summer 
months. The church was dedicated on October 23, 1923, by Dr. Kohn 
and the President of Synod. 

Dr. E. C. Cooper was in charge of this work as field missionary 
from 1927 to 1929. The parsonage was built while Rev. R. F. Shelby 
was the pastor in 1938. 

List of Pastors: 
W. J. Boger, 1910-1912 Student J. L. Norris, 1924 

E. H. Kohn, 1912-1927 Student E. F. Troutman, 1925 

Student J. E. Stockman, 1921 Student W. J. Moretz, 1926 



History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 221 

E. C. Cooper, 1927-1929 B. L. Trexler, 1941-1943 

Student M. R. Farris, 1929-1930 R. H. Kepley, 1943-1949 

M. R. Farris, 1931-1936 F. L. Conrad, Jr., 1949-1950 

R. F. Shelby, 1936-1941 H. H. Robinson, Jr., 1951- 



HOLY COMMUNION, DALLAS 

Holy Communion Church is located in Dallas, N. C, in Gaston 
County. 

The church was organized in November 1885, with nineteen mem- 
bers, by Rev. M. L. Little. Following Rev. Little, Rev. Jacob Steck of 
Maryland supplied the newly organized congregation for about six 
months. The new organization was called the College Chapel Church, 
but when the church was built, the name was changed to Holy Com- 
munion. This congregation entertained the annual convention of the 
Tennessee Synod in 1886. 

After Rev. W. A. Deaton became pastor, work was started on 
the new church, which was built of handmade brick and was erected at 
a cost of $3,150.88. This low cost was due to the sacrificial labors of 
both pastor and people which went into the building of this church. A 
lot had been given by the town of Dallas, as it did for other churches, 
and by October 8, 1905, the building was opened for services. 

In 1906 the United Synod in the South met in this church, and 
it was counted a fine meeting. A pipe organ was installed in 1917, 
which was in part a gift from the Carnegie Foundation. 

A Sunday School building was constructed as an annex to the 
church in 1924, while Rev. C. N. Yount was pastor. In 1948 a new brick 
parsonage was constructed, under the leadership of Rev. C. E. Riden- 
hour at a cost of $20,000.00. 

At the present time plans have been made and funds are being 
raised for a new building to be added for worship services, at a cost of 
approximately $100,000.00. 

List of Pastors: 

Rev. Jacob Steck, Sup., 1885-1886 Rev. P. D. Risinger, 1907-1911 

Rev. M. L. Little and Rev. L. A. Rev. A. R. Beck, 1912-1917 

Bikle, Sup., 1886-1891 Rev. C. E. Fritz, 1917-1919 

Rev. J. R. Peterson, 1891-1892 Rev. C. N. Yount, 1919-1925 

Rev. S. S. Rahn, 1892-1893 Student L. E. Blackwelder, 1925 

Rev. J. R. Peterson, 1893-1897 Rev. D. P. Rudisill, 1925-1931 

Rev. H. J. Mathias, Sup., 1897- Rev. J. J. Bickley, 1932-1944 

Rev. W. A. Deaton, 1897-1906 Rev. C. E. Ridenhour, 1945- 



222 History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 

holy communion, watauga county 

Holy Communion Church in Watauga County is located on Clark's 
Creek Mountain, two miles south from Valle Crucis. The original 
location, however, was near Valle Crucis. 

We are not certain when this church was first started. In the 
"History of Watauga County," by John Preston Arthur, page 112, speaking 
of the Lutheran church says: "One was established at Valle Crucis before 
Bishop Ives arrived in 1842." 

The Valle Crucis building was of logs and stood on the left of the 
road going from Mast's store toward the Mission School, opposite from 
the site of the Methodist Church. This property was sold, after many 
years, and the present location up on the mountain was purchased 
instead thereof. 

The second building was a frame structure, and the date on 
the cornerstone is 1884, which would seem to indicate that the change 
of locations took place about that time. However, the records show 
that this change took place while Rev. J. L. Deaton was pastor, which 
was from 1895 to 1900. 

The third church is built of field stone and is also located on Clark's 
Creek Mountain. This building was built largely by the free will 
labor of the members of the congregation. Miss Cora Pearl Jeffcoat, 
who was then parish helper in that mission, was a great inspiration 
to the congregation all through their building operations. The women 
of the ULCA contributed liberally toward the building. 

Holy Communion has all the while been associated with other 
congregations in a parish. For many years there was no regular pastor 
located in the parish, but different ministers visited and preached for 
them from time to time. Among these were Reverends Christian Moretz, 
Henry Goodman, P. C. Henkel, R. A. Yoder, D. A. Goodman, Jacob Wike, 
W. P. Cline, J. C. Moser, J. C. Dietz, and P. C. Wike. 

List of Pastors: 
Rev. J. L. Deaton, 1895-1900 Rev. M. L. Carpenter, 1913-1917 

Rev. John Hall, 1901-1905 Rev. N. D. Yount, 1918-1923 

Rev. H. A. Kistler, 1906-1910 Rev. H. W. Jeffcoat, 1923-1926 

Vacant, 1911-1912 Rev. J. A. Yount, 1926-1937 

Rev. J. A. Yount, 1912-1913 Rev. E. F. Troutman, 1938-1952 



HOLY TRINITY, CHAPEL HILL 

Holy Trinity Lutheran Church in Chapel Hill is located on East 
Rosemary Street and Pickard Lane. 

Our work in Chapel Hill dates back to the time when Rev. J. L. 
Morgan, as synodical missionary, was located in Raleigh, 1911-1919, 
and made pastoral calls on Lutheran students in the State University. 



History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 223 

Later on, Rev. J. L. Thornburg, while pastor in Durham, was placed in 
charge of student work in Chapel Hill, about 1924-1927. For a while 
seminary graduates wanting to do advanced study in the university here 
were in charge of this work, each beginning as follows: Rev. J. F. Davis, 
1928; Rev. G. A. Metz, 1929; Rev. F. P. Cauble, 1931; and Rev. R. B. 
Fisher, 1934. About 1936 Rev. P. G. Kinney was pastor here, while 
doing post graduate study at Duke University. At different periods, and 
for a year or more at a time, Rev. H. A. Schroder, pastor of St. Paul's 
Church in Durham, served this mission, his work continuing up to 1942. 

In September 1942, Rev. D. P. Rudisill took charge of this work 
while pursuing post graduate studies in Duke University, and, upon 
completion of his studies at Duke, was called as fulltime pastor in 
Chapel Hill, June 1, 1944. St. John's Church in Cherryville, and St. 
Matthew's Church in Kings Mountain, together with Holy Trinity, 
Hickory, cooperated with the Synod in providing the pastor's salary. 
Meantime, the Executive Committee of Synod authorized the purchase 
of a church lot, in Chapel Hill, while members of St. John's Church in 
Cherryville gave $5,000.00 to pay for it. 

At the Concord meeting of Synod, 1944, a resolution was offered 
by Mr. W. K. Mauney, authorizing the Brotherhood to raise $50,000.00 for 
a church building, and also the appointment of a Planning and Building 
Committee to have charge of operations. Holy Trinity Church was 
organized on Sunday, July 21, 1946, with thirty-two members, by Pastor 
Rudisill and Dr. J. L. Morgan, President of Synod. Services were held 
in Gerard Hall on the university campus. 

On August 15, 1946, Dr. Rudisill resigned as pastor here, in order 
to accept a Professorship in Lenoir Rhyne College, and on September 15, 
the same year. Dr. E. C. Cooper was called to become pastor of this 
field, which includes students in the university, and, along with his 
pastoral work to help to raise funds for a church building. 

A lot for a parsonage was purchased by St. John's Church in 
Cherryville, at a cost of $5,000.00, and a $20,000.00 building was erected 
on it. Mr. W. K. Mauney gave approximately 85 percent of the money 
for this parsonage. An appreciable sum was contributed by the local 
congregation also for this purpose. Additional funds were raised to pay 
for plumbing, heating, and lighting. 

On July 17, 1950, the contract was let for the church building, 
to cost $96,359.66. It is a brick structure, of Gothic design, with interior 
appointments according to conservative Lutheran arrangement. It has 
a full ground story fitted out for educational and social activities of the 
church. Groundbreaking services for the church building were held on 
July 23, 1950, in charge of Dr. Cooper, with Dr. D. P. Rudisill and Dr. 
J. L. Morgan sharing in the service. 

This church plant is a distinct credit to the local congregation and 
its pastor, the Synod, the Brotherhood, the Women's Missionary Society, 
the Luther League, and individual friends, all of whose combined efforts 
made it a pleasing reality. 



224 History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 

The opening services in the completed church were held on Sun- 
day, January 6, 1952, under the direction of Pastor Cooper. The corner- 
stone was laid by Dr. J. L. Morgan at 10 A.M. Dr. F. L. Conrad, Presi- 
dent of Synod, dedicated the parsonage, the educational rooms, the 
organ, and the chancel furnishings, and consecrated the church building 
as a House of God. Rev. Edgar M. Cooper was liturgist, and Dr. D. 
P. Rudisill brought the message for the occasion. 

The following is a list of pastors who ministered to the students in 
the university, from time to time, and also the regular pastors of the 
congregation. 

List of Pastors: 

J. L. Morgan, 1911-1919 Student P. G. Kinney, 1936 

J. L. Thornburg, 1924-1937 H. A. Schroder, 1937-1942 

Student J. F. Davis, 1928 Student D. P. Rudisill, 1942-1944 

Student G. A. Metz, 1929 D. P. Rudisill, 1944-1946 

Student F. P. Cauble, 1931 E. C. Cooper, 1946- 
Student R. B. Fisher, 1934 



HOLY TRINITY, CHARLOTTE 

Holy Trinity Lutheran Church, Charlotte, is located on the corner 
of The Plaza and Belle Terre Avenue. The congregation was started 
as a Sunday School which was organized February 15, 1914, in a room 
over Long's Store on the corner of Central and Pecan Avenues, sponsored 
by the Brotherhood of St. Mark's Lutheran Church, Charlotte, Rev. Robert 
L. Patterson, pastor. Mr. W. L. Dixon was the first Sunday School 
Superintendent. 

The congregation was organized April 30, 1916, with twenty-eight 
charter members. The organization was conducted by Rev. C. A. Brown, 
President of the North Carolina Synod. 

In November 1916, a lot was purchased on the corner of Central 
and Thomas Avenues for the building of a church. On January 28, 1917, 
Rev. W. A. Lutz was called as the first regular pastor. The church was 
built during the year 1917. The cornerstone was laid in April of that 
year. It was dedicated November 11, 1923. The cost was $25,000.00. 

In the year 1924 a parsonage was built by the side of the church 
facing Central Avenue, under the pastoral leadership of Rev. Roy T. 
Troutman, at a cost of $9,000.00. 

On February 10, 1946, the congregation voted to purchase a lot 
140 X 170 feet on the corner of The Plaza and Belle Terre Avenue at a 
cost of $5,000.00. On April 21, 1946, the congregation voted to sell the 
old church and parsonage for the sum of $25,000.00. Groundbreaking 
services for the new church were held June 25, 1950, by the President of 
Synod, Dr. F. L. Conrad; assisted by Dr. J. L. Morgan, President-Emeritus; 



History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 



225 



and Pastor Olin W. Sink. The cornerstone was laid December 10, 1950, 
by President Conrad and Pastor Sink. The church was completed in 
March 1951. It is valued at $125,000.00, including the furnishings. It 
has a seating capacity of 350 and an educational building that ac- 
commodates 300. 




Holy Tritinity Lutheran Church 

Charlotte, North Carolina 



In February 1951 a new parsonage was purchased on the corner 
of The Plaza and Chestnue Avenue, one block from the church, at a 
cost of $13,000.00. 



List of Pastors; 



R. L. Patterson, Sup., 1914 
W. P. Cline, Jr., Sup., 1914 
J. P. Miller, Sup., 1914-1915 
E. H. Kohn, Sup., 1915-1916 
Student F. B. Lingle, 1916 
A. G. Voigt, Sup., 1916-1917 
L. G. M. Miller, Sup., 1916-1917 



W. A. Lutz, 1917-1924 
R. T. Troutman, 1924-1927 
J. F. Davis, Sup., 1927 
John L. Morgan, 1928-1934 
R. L. Patterson, 1934-1936 
Olin W. Sink, 1936- 



226 History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 

HOLY TRINITY, GASTONIA 

Holy Trinity Lutheran Church in Gastonia is located on South 
York Street, opposite the City High School. The original location was 
on York Street near the Southern Railroad. 

This church was organized in the YMCA Building on April 30, 
1899, with twenty -two members. The organization was in charge of Rev. 
W. J. Boger, D.D., then pastor of Lutheran Chapel congregation in East 
Gastonia, and Rev. W. A. Deaton, D.D., then pastor of Holy Communion 
congregation in Dallas, N. C. The name first chosen for the new con- 
gregation was Gastonia Evangelical Lutheran Church, but it was, in 
1918, changed to Holy Trinity Lutheran Church. 

The lot for the first church, near the railroad, was purchased on 
August 4, 1898, nearly a year before the church was organized, at a 
price of $540.00. The church erected on this lot was a brick structure, 
and was completed in 1900. The District Conference of the Tennessee 
Synod met in the new church on April 27, 1900. 

Sunday School rooms were added in 1921, under the pastoral 
direction of Rev. J. C. Dietz, D.D., and a pipe organ was purchased and 
installed about the same time. The parsonage on South York Street 
was built in 1925, and was first occupied by Rev. J. L. Yost, D.D., and 
family. 

The lot for the new church on South York Street was purchased 
in 1939, while Rev. Mr. Bowden was pastor, for $4,250.00. Ground- 
breaking services for their new house of worship were held on April 
9, 1950, and the cornerstone for the building was laid on November 5, 
that same year, both by Dr. F. L. Conrad, President of Synod, and 
their pastor, Rev. Geo. W. Lingle, who was assisted by his father. 
Rev. G. H. L. Lingle. 

This is a large and beautiful church, built of brick, with stone 
trimmings, in which the nave, chancel, and furnishings all harmonize in 
producing an atmosphere of worship. It has a ground story for edu- 
cational and other programs of the congregation. The estimated cost 
of the building and equipment is approximately a little over $200,000.00. 

Opening services were held in the completed building on Sunday, 
August 5, 1951, with a sermon by the President of Synod, and Pastor 
Lingle conducting the liturgical services, assisted by his father-in-law, 
Rev. P. J. Bame. 

List of Pastors: 

W. J. Boger and W. A. Deaton, John Hall, 1905-1912 

Organizers, 1898-1900 M. A. Ashby, 1912-1913 

J. L. Cromer, 1900-1901 J. C. Dietz, 1914-1923 

W. J. Boger and J. L. Yost, 1923-1929 

W. A. Deaton, Sup., 1901-1902 G. S. Bowden, 1929-1944 

C. L Morgan, 1902-1905 Geo. W. Lingle, 1945- 



History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 227 

holy trinity, hickory 

Holy Trinity Church in Hickory was organized on Friday, Septem- 
ber 22, 1876, with twenty-six members. The meeting was held in the 
Town Hall of Hickory. 

Following the adoption of a constitution and the election of of- 
ficers, formal application was made for enrollment in the Tennessee 
Synod, and they were enrolled at the October meeting that year. 

It is a little uncertain who the minister was that helped this 
group to effect the organization; however, he is thought to have been 
Rev. A. J. Fox. For the first four years the congregation did not have a 
resident pastor. Then in 1880, the North Carolina Conference of the 
Tennessee Synod appointed Rev. A. J. Fox to take charge of the congre- 
gation. 

For the sake of clarity, we note here that a second Lutheran 
Church was organized in Hickory in 1880, which applied to the North 
Carolina Synod for admission that year. The name of this congregation 
was Christ Lutheran Church. A lot was secured, and on December 31, 
1881, the cornerstone of the church was laid. The pastor of this church 
was Rev. J. A. Linn, who served it in a parish with Beth Eden Church 
in Newton, which at that time belonged to the North Carolina Synod. 
However, in 1884, the North Carolina Synod advised the members of 
Christ Church to unite with the Tennessee Synod congregation, which 
they did, and Christ Church was discontinued. Up to this time the 
Tennessee congregation in that town had been referred to as the "Hickory 
Church", but in 1884 it was named Holy Trinity. 

In 1880 Rev. A. J. Fox accepted a call from Holy Trinity and served 
it along with a number of other congregations until his death on June 
10, 1884. 

Mr. Henry W. Robinson gave the church a building lot in 1881, 
and plans were soon worked out for a house of worship. The building 
was a frame structure 36 x 70 feet with a vestibule, steeple for a bell, 
and a balcony over the front entrance. 

By 1904 a new brick church was under construction. The corner- 
stone for this building was laid June 8, 1904, and on the first Sunday 
in November 1905 the first service was held in the completed building. 
The church was dedicated March 3, 1907, the service being in charge of 
their Pastor, J. C. Moser, D.D. The building is fitted out with rooms for 
Sunday School. The total cost for the church and furnishings was about 
$12,000. 

Up to this time Holy Trinity had been in a parish with one or 
more other churches, but when they got in their new church Pastor Moser 
was called to give his fulltime service to this one congregation, which 
he did until near the time of his death in 1911. 

About the year 1935, while Rev. V. C. Ridenhour, D.D. was pastor, 
a new and modern parsonage was built a few blocks from the church, 
and the old parsonage was converted into an Educational Building. 



228 History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 

Now the congregation, under Pastor H. L. Dressler's leadership, has 
again outgrown its building. A new lot has been donated by the Alfred 
Moretz family, and a new and larger church will, in a few years, be 
built. Pastor Dressier died unexpectedly on November 10, 1952. 

List of Pastors: 

A. J. Fox, 1880-1884 C. R. W. Kegley, 1919-1923 

B. S. Brown, 1887-1888 P. E. Monroe, 1924-1930 

J. C. Moser, 1888-1911 V. C. Ridenhour, 1930-1941 

J. H. Wannemacher, 1911-1915 Voigt R. Cromer, 1941-1947 

W. E. Murray, 1915-1919 Hugo L. Dressier, 1947-1952 



HOLY TRINITY, MT. PLEASANT 

Holy Trinity Church is located in the town of Mt. Pleasant, in 
Cabarrus County. The church was organized in the chapel of North 
Carolina College in 1868 by Rev. L. C. Groseclose, then pastor of St. 
John's Church. The congregation worshiped in the college chapel for 
five years. 

On March 18, 1871, a lot was secured, and the next year a new 
brick church 40 x 50 feet was constructed. It was dedicated on Sunday, 
March 30, 1873, during a meeting of Conference, by Pastor D. M. Henkel 
and Rev. Nathan Aldrich, who preached the dedicatory sermon. 

In the year 1902, a steeper roof was placed on the building, and a 
tall spire built to the tower. But by 1952 the old spire was replaced 
by one not so tall. The interior of the church was refinished while Rev. 
J. W. Link was pastor there, and new pews and chancel furniture were 
installed. 

A new Educational Building was constructed in 1949, during Rev. 
D. F. Cooper's term of service, at a cost of $35,000.00. This building 
was fully freed of debt under the leadership of Rev. E. R. Trexler, and 
was dedicated October 26, 1952. 

For many years Holy Trinity was the spiritual mother to students 
in North Carolina College, the Collegiate Institute, and in Mont Amoena 
Seminary. 

Their first parsonage stood on the east side of the street in close 
proximity to the old Mont Amoena Seminary. This building was de- 
stroyed by fire about 1910. Meanwhile a house and lot on the south side 
of the church was secured for a parsonage, but this was likewise burned 
in 1915. They then built the present home for the pastor. 

List of Pastors: 
L. C. Groseclose, 1868-1872 J. H. Wyse, 1888-1889 

D. M. Henkel, 1872-1875 J. D. Shirey and C. L. T. 

J. B. Davis, 1881-1887 Fisher, Sup., 1890-1892 



History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 229 

B. S. Brown, Sr., 1892-1895 R. A. Goodman, 1911-1921 

H. N. Miller, 1897-1898 C. A. Linn, 1922-1923 

P. H. E. Derrick, Sup., 1897 C. L. T. Fisher, 1923-1925 

J. A. Linn, 1898-1902 C. L. T. Fisher, Sup., 1926 

L. E. Busby, 1902-1903 J. W. Link, 1927-1947 

H. A. McCullough, 1903-1907 David F. Cooper, 1947-1949 

J. P. Miller, 1907-1911 E. R. Trexler, 1950- 



HOLY TRINITY, RALEIGH 

Holy Trinity Church in Raleigh is located at 624 Hillsboro Street. 
This church was started and established by Rev. J. L. Morgan, Synod- 
ical Missionary of the North Carolina Synod, who moved to Raleigh 
June 19, 1911. 

The first service was on Sunday, July 2, 1911 in the Chamber 
of Commerce Rooms on Fayetteville Street. The attendance that day, 
besides the pastor and his family, was two — Mr. John C. Root and Mr. 
Moses L. Brown. The pastor had to divide his time with other mission 
points, so that at first services were held only twice per month. The 
church was organized July 7, 1912 with twelve members. The officers 
elected were: A. E. Goodmar fcnd J. C. Root, Elders; O. M. Clark and 
L. R. Detjen, Deacons. J. C. Root was elected Secretary -Treasurer. 

On July 19, 1913, the lot on Hillsboro Street was purchased for 
$4,750.00. The Home Mission Board of the United Lutheran Synod South 
assisted in this purchase. On April 2, 1914, work was begun on thf 
church building. Mr. W. H. Germann, a member of the Lutheran Church, 
supervised the construction. The cost of the church was approximately 
$10,000.00, of which the Women's Synodical Society gave $6,000.00. 

The cornerstone was laid August 5, 1914 by Dr. M. M. Kinard, 
President of Synod, and Pastor Morgan. The first service held in the 
new church was on Sunday, May 9, 1915, with an attendance of 125 
persons. On July 4, 1915 baptism was administered for John Shipman 
Bost and for Linus Marcellus Parker, Jr., who were the first to be 
baptised in the new church. The first member confirmed in the church 
was Pauline Miller, now Mrs. A. M. Huffman, on April 23, 1916, Easter 
Sunday morning. The church was dedicated September 7, 1919, by Rev. 
M. L. Stirewalt and the pastor, Rev. J. L. Morgan. 

Pastor Morgan, having been elected as fulltime President of Synod 
in May 1919, resigned Holy Trinity Church, effective September 30, 
1919, and moved to Salisbury to take up his new work. Rev. A. M. 
Huffman, just back from World War I, in which he was a chaplain, 
was called to Holy Trinity and took charge October 1, 1919. 

On July 1, 1922, while Rev. Huffman was pastor, the house and 
lot by the side of the church were purchased for parsonage and Sun- 



230 History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 

day School purposes at a consideration of $17,000.00. A pipe organ 
was purchased and installed in 1925, while Rev. E. R. McCauley was 
pastor, at a cost of $3,500.00. A number of improvements were made 
while Rev. C. E. Norman was pastor there, notwithstanding the hard- 
ships of World War II. Under the leadership of Pastor Stroup, the 
congregation began looking forward to a new house of worship 

List of Pastors: 
Jacob L. Morgan, 1911-1919 R. B. Peery, 1931-1933 

A. M. Huffman, 1919-1924 C. E. Norman, 1933-1949 

E. R. McCauley, 1924-1929 H. W. Stroup, 1950-1952 

Student F. P. Cauble, 1930 



HOLY TRINITY, TROUTMAN 

Holy Trinity Church is located in the town of Troutman in Iredell 
County. This church was organized January 5, 1924, when St. Michael's 
Church of the former North Carolina Synod, where Rev. John L. Morgan 
was pastor; and St. Martin's Church of the former Tennessee Synod, 
where Rev. D. L. Miller was pastor, merged into one congregation 
under the name of Holy Trinity. But, back of this: 

St. Michael's Church was organized in 1815 by Rev. Robert J. 
Miller in the Cambridge Associate Presbyterian Church, two miles south 
of Troutman, where services were held for eight years. The church was 
received into the North Carolina Synod in October, 1815, as New Perth 
Lutheran Church. 

In 1823 Michael Walcher donated a tract of land, one mile south- 
east of Troutman, to the Lutherans and Episcopalians for a church site. 
A log church 25 x 36 feet was built here for the use of these two organi- 
zations. 

For several years both congregations worshipped here, alternately, 
until the Episcopalians withdrew and built a church of their own. St. 
Michael's second church was a frame structure 36 x 60 feet and was 
located in Troutman, where the present church stands. The corner- 
stone for it was laid August 19, 1886. It was dedicated August 14, 1892 
by Rev. D. W. Micheal, and Rev. J. D. Shirey, D.D. 

St. Martin's Church was organized June 28, 1833, with twenty-three 
members, most of whom came from St. Michael's congregation, by Rev. 
Henry Goodman, under an apple tree in his yard. 

William Lippard donated a tract of land for the church, about 
three miles northwest from Troutman. A small frame church was built 
here which was later replaced by a larger frame building, in 1853, while 
Rev. Timothy Moser was pastor. This building was refinished in 1902, 
and served their needs until the two congregations united in 1924. 



History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 



231 



Following the merging of the two congregations, a call was ex- 
tended to Rev. John L. Morgan, who came and at once began paving 
the way for a new house of worship. A modern brick building with 
basement was constructed in 1927-1928. The cornerstone was laid April 
3, 1927, by Pastor Morgan and the President of Synod. The new church 
was opened for services in 1928. It was dedicated December 1, 1935, 
by the Pastor, Rev. P. D. Risinger, Rev. John L. Morgan, and the Presi- 
dent of Synod. 

A new brick parsonage was built by Rev. John L. Morgan in 1924, 
which was later taken over, in a trade, by the congregation. It is just 
across the street from the church. 

From here came the following ministers: Revs. Simeon W. Harkey, 
Luther Goodman, David Goodman, C. K. Lippard, Carl O. Lippard, 
Wike Lippard, H. C. Haithcock, Roy T. Troutman, Edwin F. Troutman, 
C. F. Kyles, and J. Paul Rimmer. 

List of Pastors: 



At St. 
R. J. Miller, 1815-1821 
John Reck, 1825-1830 
J. T. Tabler, 1832 
Benjamin Arey, 1837-1853 
S. Scherer and John 

Swicegood, Sup., 1853-1856 
Paul Kistler, 1856-1858 
J. D. Stingley, 1860-1862 
G. D. Bernheim, 1862-1865 
Whitson Kimball, 1868-1870 
J. H. Fesperman, 1871-1877 
J. B. Anthony, 1878-1880 
H. M. Brown, 1882-1887 
Whitson Kimball, 1888 



Michael's 

T. H. Strohecker, 1889-1891 
D. W. Michael, 1891-1894 
G. S. Diven, Sup., 1895 

B. S. Brown, Sr., 1896-1899 
R. A. Helms, 1899-1900 

C. B. King, Sup., 1901 

V. C. Ridenhour, 1901-1905 
R. R. Sowers, 1905-1907 
C. R. Pless, 1908-1909 
H. W. Jeff coat, 1909-1912 
T. C. Parker, 1912-1914 
Student C. E. Norman, 1915 
John L. Morgan, 1916-1923 



At St. Martin's 



Henry Goodman, 1833-1841 
J. W. Hull, 1841-1848 
Timothy Moser, 1848-1857 
J. M. Smith, 1857-1870 
Henry Goodman, 1871-1873 
T. Moser, Sup., 1873 
A. J. Fox, 1874-1875 
P. C. Henkel, 1876-1881 
J. C. Moser, 1881-1883 
C. H. Bernheim, 1883-1886 



D. J. Settlemyre, 1887-1891 
G. A. Romoser, 1892-1893 
W. P. Cline, 1894-1895 
W. L. Darr, 1896-1906 

C. J. Sox, 1907-1910 

W. D. Haltiwanger, 1913-1916 
F. C. Longaker, Sup., 1917 
J. M. Senter, 1918-1920 

D. L. Miller, 1921-1923 



At Holy Trinity 
John L. Morgan, 1924-1927 E. Fulenwider, 1940-1947 

P. D. Risinger, 1928-1936 O. G. Swicegood, 1947- 

Q. O. Lyerly, 1936-1940 



232 History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 
holy trinity, watauga county 

Holy Trinity Church is located in Watauga County at Deep Gap, 
ten miles east of Boone. 

For many years we have had a group of faithful and loyal 
Lutherans in this community. Rev. J. L. Deaton preached for them in 
a school house. In more recent years a frame church was built, about 
two miles north from the present location, and a congregation was 
organized under the pastoral supervision of Rev. N. D. Yount in the 
year 1918. This church was dedicated on July 13, 1919 in charge of 
Pastor Yount, with Rev. J. A. Yount preaching the dedication sermon. 

Some years later the lot on the main highway was purchased, 
and in 1939 a nice new church was erected at that place. The corner- 
stone laying services, the formal opening of the new church, and its 
dedication all took place on Sunday, July 23, 1939. These services 
were in charge of the President of Synod, together with Pastor J. A. 
Yount, Rev. W. A. Deaton, D.D., and Rev. E. F. Troutman. 

This congregation is associated with the other churches of the 
Watauga Parish and has an interest in a parsonage at Mt. Pleasant 
Church, where a new building was recently put up to replace the one 
which was destroyed by fire. 

List of Pastors: 

N. D. Yount, 1918-1823 J. A. Yount, 1938-1939 

H. W. Jeffcoat, 1923-1925 J. A. Yount, Sup., 1939-1943 

W. A. Deaton, 1925-1931 H. B. Leonard, 1943-1944 

Students D. F. Swicegood, O. G. H. H. Ritchie, 1944-1946 

Swicegood, and others, Sup., F. M. Speagle, 1947-1951 

1931-1934 H. C. Linn, 1951- 
H. A. Kistler, 1934-1937 



KIMBALL MEMORIAL, KANNAPOLIS 

Kimball Memorial Church is located on South Union Street in 
Kannapolis, N. C. 

This church was organized February 15, 1914 in the Y.M.C.A. 
Auditorium, with twenty-three members, by Rev. C. A. Brown of China 
Grove, N. C, then President of the N. C. Synod. Rev. G. H. C. Park 
was called as regular pastor, February 26, 1924, to take charge after 
his ordination. May 10, 1914. Plans were at once made for a house 
of worship. The cornerstone of the new church was laid May 20, 1917, 
by Pastor Park and Rev. C. A. Brown, president of Synod. The Church 
was opened for divine services February 17, 1918. 

Rev. Park closed his work as pastor here May 1, 1922 and was 
succeeded by Rev. M. L. Ridenhour, the same day. At this time the 
church assumed full self-support. Under Pastor Ridenhour's leader- 
ship, it became necessary to provide for more room, so the transept on 
the north side of the church was extended and additions were made to 
the west end of the building for classrooms. The pipe organ was pur- 



History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 233 

chased and installed in 1934. Pastor Ridenhour died in the prime of 
his life, May 10, 1937. 

Rev. J. L. Norris was called on October 20, 1937. During his pastor- 
ate, a large Parish Education Building was constructed. Work on this 
building was begun August 7, 1939, and it was ready and opened for 
Sunday School work on January 21, 1940. The cost of this building, 
which has six assembly halls, and thirty class rooms, all modernly 
equipped, was approximately $25,000.00. 

Pastor Norris resigned, effective December 31, 1946, to accept a call 
to Macedonia Church in Burlington, N. C, and Rev. R. F. Shelby was 
called to Kimball Memorial effective March 1, 1947. 

Soon after Pastor Shelby took charge of this work, a house and 
lot were bought for a parsonage in the Jackson Park area, but in 1951 
the congregation purchased the houses and lot by the north side of the 
church for parsonage purposes, and for future needs for a new church, 
at a cost of $37,500.00. The house and lot in Jackson Park were sold 
in 1952. 

This church was started with 23 confirmed members in 1914, and 
it now has an enrollment of 940. 

List of Pastors: 

G. H. C. Park, 1914-1922 J. L. Norris, 1937-1946 

M. L. Ridenhour, 1922-1937 R. F. Shelby, 1947- 



KURE MEMORIAL, KURE BEACH 

Kure Memorial Lutheran Church is located at Kure Beach, 18 miles 
south of Wilmington, North Carolina, and 3 miles north of Fort Fisher. 

A frame Chapel, composed of two old army barracks, was erected 
in 1946 on a lot 200 x 100 bequeathed by Hans Kure, a Lutheran, for 
religious purposes. 

For about two years. Rev. B. D. Wessinger, D.D., a retired Lutheran 
minister, formerly of the North Carolina Synod, conducted worship 
services in the Chapel. 

Kure Memorial Chapel operated as non-denominational until 
October 7, 1951, at which time Jack Martin, supply student from the 
Southern Seminary, organized Kure Memorial Lutheran Church with 
thirty-six members. The church was received into the North Carolina 
Synod at the 1952 Convention. 

A seven-room frame parsonage, with enclosed garage, was built 
on the northeast corner of the lot in the Spring of 1952 at a cost of 
$9,650.00. The Synod making a grant of $5,000, and the congregation 
assuming the remainder. 

Student W. Dexter Moser, Jr., supplied during the summer of 1949, 
and student Jack Martin during the summers of 1950 and 1951. 
Rev. David F. Johnson became Mission Developer on June 1, 1952. 

Adult membership now stands at sixty-five. 
List of Pastors: 
David F. Johnson 



234 History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 

LEBANON, DAVIDSON CO. 

Lebanon Church is located in Davidson County, six miles east 
of Lexington. It is not known when this church was organized; how- 
ever, the Old Church Book records baptisms as far back as October 4, 
1834, and communion services in 1835. Record of business meetings 
are also carried from time to time, for instance, in 1855, 1865, 1870, 
1874, 1880, and 1890 for the election of officers or other matters. 

The original name by which this congregation was known was the 
Arbor Church, but about 1890 it was named Lebanon Lutheran Church. 
This indicates that for a while the congregation worshiped under an 
arbor. About this time, 1890, a frame church 25x45 feet was started 
and was used for a while before it was completed. Up to this time the 
work appears to have been carried on by the North Carolina Synod, 
but a group of Tennessee Synod members petitioned the Northern 
Conference of the North Carolina Synod, at a meeting at St. Luke's 
Church in Tyro, July 28-29, 1893, to grant the Tennessee Synod brethren 
a half interest in the church property. This request was granted, with 
the provision that the two groups would cooperate in completing the 
church building which had recently been started. From this time on 
most of the services were by pastors of the Tennessee Synod, until 
1921, when the Synods reunited. 

In 1930, the church was remodeled and brick veneered. Transepts 
were added and classrooms built, which gives it an attractive appearance. 

In 1950 this church and Silver Valley were placed in a parish 
together, which, since that arrangement, have purchased a house and 
lot at Silver Valley for a parsonage. 

We have not found a complete list of pastors for this congre- 
gation; however, the following served here at one time or another: 

List of Pastors: 
W. A. Julian, 1854-1862 J. M. Senter, 1912-1918 

W. H. Cone, 1864-1865 R. B. Sigmon, 1919-1928 

J. D. Bowles, 1870-1874 R. L. Fisher, 1928-1942 

C. H. Bernheim, 1874-1878 C. F. Kyles, 1942-1945 

Jacob Wike, 1891-1893 C. R. Patterson, Sup., 1946-1947 

C. L. Miller, 1898-1903 C. R. Ritchie , Sup., 1947-1948 

J. C. Wessinger, 1904-1905 C. S. Wessinger, Sup., 1948-1949 

A. L. Boliek, 1906-1909 C. C. Adderholdt, 1950-1951 

E. F. K. Roof, 1953- 



LEBANON, ROWAN CO. 

Lebanon Church is located in Rowan County, about two miles 
north from the town of Barber. 

This church is an outgrowth of a Sunday School which, for a 
few years, had been conducted in a log school house in that neighbor- 



History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 235 

hood. This congregation was organized on September 17, 1893, in the 
school building, with eight members enrolled that day. Rev. B. W. 
Cronk was in charge of the organization. 

A lot and timber for a church were given by Eli Powlas, and the 
other members and friends had the timber sawed and prepared for 
use. The building was erected largely by the members themselves, 
without charge, and was dedicated free of debt, December 22, 1896. 

Their parsonage was built near the church about the time Rev. 
Boland became pastor in 1904, by the members of the three congre- 
gations in the parish — Lebanon, St. Matthews, and Providence. The 
lot and timber for the framing were given by Eli Powlas, and the fin- 
ishing lumber by members of the other two congregations. The carpen- 
ter work was done mostly by free labor by the congregation. Both 
the church and parsonage have been repaired and redecorated during 
the past few years. 

Lebanon is the home church of the Powlas sisters — eight of them — 
who have given such full service to the church, both at home and 
abroad. 

List of Pastors: 

B. W. Cronk, 1893-1894 G. H. Cox, Sup., 1922 
V. Y. Boozer, 1894-1895 J. L. Yost, Sup., 1923 
H. N. Miller, 1895-1897 W. G. Cobb, Sup., 1924 
Student W. W. J. Ritchie, John L. Morgan, Sup., 1925 

Sup., 1897 E. F. Troutman, 1926-1929 

H. A. Trexler, 1897-1904 C. F. Kyles, 1929-1932 

L. P. Boland, 1904-1908 r. h. Kepley, 1932-1935 

T. C. Parker, 1908-1913 O. G. Swicegood, 1935-1937 

Students H. S. Petrea and John h. A. Kistler, 1937-1938 

L. Morgan and Pastors L E. ^ ^ Misenheimer, 1938-1939 

m3^19M ""■ ""■ ^''''''^' ^''''■' J- ^- Stoner, 1939-1945 

V. R. Stickley, 1915-1920 ^^^^^^ ^- ^1°°?' 1948-1950 

C. M. Fox, Sup., 1921 ^- Kenneth Knight, Sup., 1951 

F. C. Trexler, Sup., 1952 



LOWS, GUILFORD. CO. 

Lows Church is located in Guilford County, about 18 miles 
southeast from Greensboro, and two miles south from the Alamance 
Battle Ground. It is situated on what, at that time, was known as the 
Trading Path, leading from Hillsboro to Salisbury. According to Colonel 
Byrd, in his "History of the Dividing Line," this road was in use in 1728, 
and was widely used by Pennsylvania immigrants who came into that 
section of the state in large numbers from 1750 to 1760. 

It is not definitely known when this church was organized. The 
date given in the more recent Minutes of Synod is 1771, but judging 



236 



History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 



from the number of German families which settled in that area at a 
much earlier time, one would think that the church was started at an 
earlier date. There is evidence to substantiate the claim that itinerant 
preachers visited and preached to both Lutheran and Reformed groups 
at repeated intervals from 1759 to 1764, and it is quite likely that this 
church was organized about that time, if not earlier. 

Rev. George Soelle, who was ordained a Lutheran minister in 
Denmark in 1741, later came to America and worked with the Moravian 
Brethren, visited in the Guilford section and preached for the churches 
there about 1769 and the following two or three years. Rev. Adolph 
Nussmann made repeated visits to Lows and other churches in that 
section and ministered to the spiritual needs of those people, beginning 
about 1773. 

The first building for Lows, of which we have definite knowledge, 
was a log structure, and was used by both Lutheran and Reformed 
congregations, which stood about where the present Lows Church now 
stands. It is thought that this building was in use as far back as 
1765 or 1770, while improvised places of worship may have been used 
prior to that time. But the Reformed congregation withdrew, after 
some years, and built a church of their own, a few miles away, which 
is now known as Brick Church. 

The second building was a frame structure, built in 1841, by the 
Lutheran congregation alone. It was used until 1889, in which year 
the present frame building was constructed. This is their third building 
of which we have record. In 1934, under the leadership of Rev. D. I. 
Offman, this building was remodeled and provision made for Sunday 
School class work and other necessities of modern church activities. A 
Recreational Building was constructed in 1950, under Rev. Q. O. Lyerly's 
pastoral leadership, near the main church. 

The parsonage for the parish was located at Lows until 1940, 
however the pastor did not always live there, but when Cobles built a 
parsonage near that church, the pastor lived at Cobles. In 1952 Lows and 
Cobles each decided to have a full time pastor, and Lows is now 
building a new parsonage on their grounds. 



List of Pastors: 



Adolph Nussmann, 1774-1789 
J. G. Arends, 1775-1789 

C. E. Bernhardt, 1789-1800 
Philip Henkel, 1800-1805 
Ludwig Markert, 1805-1810 
Jacob Scherer, 1810-1828 
Jacob Grieson, Asst., 1810-1854 

D. J. Hauer, Asst., 1827-1828 
William Artz, 1829-1853 
John Swicegood, 1854 
Simeon Scherer, 1855-1859 
B. C. Hall, 1860-1864 



W. A. Julian, 1865-1870 
E. P. Parker, 1871-1882 

A. D. L. Moser, 1883-1886 

B. W. Cronk, 1887-1891 
H. M. Brown, 1891-1902 
R. R. Sowers, 1903-1905 

C. M. Fox, 1906-1907 
V. R. Stickley, 1909-1913 
H. W. Jeffcoat, 1914-1921 

D. I. Offman, 1922-1940 
Q. O. Lyerly, 1940-1952 



History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 237 



LUTHERAN CHAPEL, CHINA GROVE 

Lutheran Chapel Church is located in Rowan County, just south 
of China Grove on the east side of the Southern Railroad. It is not 
known definitely when this church was organized; however, reliable 
tradition indicates that Pastors Nussmann and Arends held regular 
services in this community prior to 1780 and that a congregation was 
organized about that time. Pastor C. A. G. Storch became pastor here 
January 7, 1789. 

In "Historical Sketches of the Reformed Church in North Caro- 
lina" it is stated that the first building was of logs, afterwards dis- 
placed by a larger one which was burned, and that a third building 
was then erected. It was at that time called Savitz Church. The first 
building of which we have record was erected in 1799, by the Lutheran 
and German Reformed congregations and was used jointly until 1834. 
It was at the old grave yard, west of the railroad. Meanwhile, following 
the organization of the Tennessee Synod in 1820, a number of the Chape] 
members formed a new congregation named Mt. Moriah in affiliation 
with that Synod, which also worshiped in this same building. 

Then, about 1836, each group proceeded to provide a church home 
for itself. About 1835 the Lutheran Chapel congregation purchased two 
and one-half acres of land adjacent to the original tract from Moses 
Linn and erected a frame building 40 x 60 feet. 

The original unit of the present brick church was erected in 1866, 
while Rev. Whitson Kimball was pastor. Considerable additions were 
made in 1892 while Rev. Marks was pastor, and in 1933 under Rev. 
C. E. Ridenhour's leadership, for Sunday School and other organizational 
work. 

A parsonage was built near China Grove about 1881, while Dr. 
B. S. Brown, Sr., was pastor there. A modern brick house was erected 
in 1951 on the west side of the railroad, under the supervision of Dr. 
B. S. Brown, Jr. 

In 1834 the congregation, under the pastoral leadership of Rev. 
Henry Graeber, adopted a constitution which helped to guide them in 
their future worship and activities. 

This church has had different names: At first it was referred to 
as Savitz Church, while the correct name for it at that time was Luther's 
Chapel. Then in 1866, when the cornerstone for the new brick church 
was being readied, the name was changed to "Lutheran Chapel". 

It is thought that this church was one of the original congregations 
that took part in the organization of the Synod in Salisbury in 1803. 

It would seem of interest here to note that while Rev. John D. 
Scheck was pastor at this church, he was made postmaster at China 
Grove from 1844 to 1849, and that the name of the post office was changed 
in 1846 from China Grove to Lutherville; however, it was changed back 
in 1849. 



238 History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 

This church might well be called a mother church, because from 
her have gone out so many members to help organize and build other 
surrounding congregations. But with it all, Lutheran Chapel is stronger 
today than at any other time in her history. 

Fortunately we find here a fairly complete list of pastors who 
served this church. 

List of Pastors: 

A. Nussmann and J. G. Whitson Kimball, 1861-1877 
Arends, 1780-1789 W. H. Cone, 1877-1881 

C. A. G. Storch, 1789-1820 B. S. Brown, Sr., 1881-1887 

Daniel Scherer, 1820-1830 J. L. Buck, 1887-1889 

Jacob Kaempfer, 1830-1833 C. A. Marks, 1889-1896 

Henry Graeber, 1833-1837 J. Q. Wertz, 1896-1907 

J. D. Scheck, 1837-1854 C. A. Brov^, 1908-1924 

S. Rothrock, 1854-1855 E. F. K. Roof, 1925-1928 

B. C. Hall, 1855-1857 C. E. Ridenhour, 1928-1945 
William Artz, 1859-1861 B. S. Brown, Jr., 1946- 



LUTHERAN CHAPEL, GASTONIA 

Lutheran Chapel Church is located in Gaston County, in the 
eastern extension of Gastonia. 

This church was organized by Rev. Abel J. Brown, in the year 
1828. Mr. Caleb J. Lineberger, who was born in 1818, used to say he 
helped to haul logs for the first church when he was ten years old. 
That would be in 1828. 

Rev. J. R. Peterson was pastor when, in 1872, the original frame 
building was replaced by a brick church, about 40 x 60 feet. The corner- 
stone of this building was laid in December 1872, by Rev. A. J. Fox, 
President of the Tennessee Synod, assisted by Pastor Peterson, and Rev. 
Nathan Aldrich, Pastor of St. Mark's Lutheran Church in Charlotte. This 
was the first brick church in Gaston County. It was dedicated on June 1, 
1884, by Dr. L. A. Bikle, and Pastor Peterson. 

On Monday morning, January 8, 1883, the interior of the church 
was burned out, leaving the walls standing. The inside of the building 
was soon rebuilt, and the church used again. Meanwhile, Pastor Peter- 
son had resigned before the building was burned, and so preached only 
one time after the fire. Rev. M. L. Little succeeded Rev. Mr. Peterson 
as pastor, and served the congregation until he was killed in a train 
wreck on February 16, 1891. 

In 1898, members of Lutheran Chapel, led by their pastor. Rev. W. 
J. Boger, took an active part in organizing Holy Trinity Church in 
Gastonia. On March 1, 1922 Rev. G. H. C. Park became the first full- 
time pastor of Lutheran Chapel. 



History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 239 

In 1902, 1910, and 1919 respectively, three tracts of land, ad- 
joining the church property, were secured, which gives the church in 
all, about eleven acres. 

In 1922-1923 a new brick church was constructed, under Rev. 
Park's pastoral leadership, at a cost of around $50,000.00 of which Mr. 
D. E. Rhyne gave an initial sum of $10,000.00. This building has a full 
basement, and is provided with equipment for modern church work. 
The new building was opened for services in the summer of 1923. The 
1924 meeting of Synod was held here in November 17-20. This church 
was dedicated November 8, 1936. Meanwhile the parsonage has been 
modernized and made inviting for the pastor. 

List of Pastors: 

A. J. Brown, 1828 L. L. Huffman, 1914-1915 

J. R. Peterson, 1840-1883 A. L. Bolick, 1916-1921 

M. L. Little, 1883-1891 G. H. C. Park, 1922-1926 

L. L. Lohr, 1891-1893 V. Y. Boozer, 1926-1931 

S. S. Rahh, Sup., 1894 C. O. Lippard, 1932-1933 

J. A. Rudisill, 1895 J. F. Davis, 1933-1938 

J. F. Moser, 1895-1897 F. P. Cauble, 1938-1941 

W. J. Boger, 1897-1909 C. V. Deal, 1941-1942 

John Hall, 1910-1911 John L. Morgan, 1942-1947 

M. A. Ashby, 1912 L. C. Bumgarner, 1947-1952 



LUTHER'S CHAPEL, LINCOLNTON 

Luther's Chapel Church was located in Lincoln County, two miles 
north of Lincolnton, on the highway leading to Maiden. 

The church was organized about 1885 with twenty members in 
a nearby school building by Rev. M. L. Carpenter. The deed for the 
church lot bears the date July 7, 1885. 

The first building was a cheap frame structure, probably erected 
the same year in which the organization was effected. In 1905 a new 
and better frame building was erected and dedicated, which was used 
until services were discontinued there in 1949, after which it was 
sold and dismantled. The proceeds were used to fix up the graveyard. 

This church was at first connected with the Ohio Synod, but 
in 1912, under the pastoral leadership of Rev. J. M. Senter, it applied 
for membership and was received into the Tennessee Synod. It was for 
the last number of years associated with the Maiden Parish, but when St. 



240 History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 

Martin's became self-sustaining, no further pastoral provision was 
made for Luther's Chapel, so in 1949 it became inactive and disbanded. 

List of Pastors: 
G. A. Derhammer, 1900-1902 J. E. Walker, 1942-1947 

J. M. Senter, 1903-1912 A. H. Keck, Jr., Sup., 1947-1948 

F. M. Speagle, 1914-1917 H. A. McCullough, Jr., Sup., 

W. D. Wise, 1918-1921 1948-1949 



LUTHER'S CHURCH, ROWAN CO. 

Luther's Church is located in the southeastern part of Rowan 
County, about three miles west of the Yadkin River, on the Stokes 
Ferry Road. 

It is not definitely known when this church was organized; how- 
ever, the Minutes of the North Carolina Synod for 1828, page 7, re- 
port: "Petition from the members of the congregation of Luther's 
Church, Rowan County, which was lately organized through the instru- 
mentality of Rev. Daniel Scherer, to be received into connection with 
this body, and to be supplied with regular preaching." The congre- 
gation was received and Pastor Scherer was asked to continue to serve 
the new congregation. 

The first church was a log building, which stood between the place 
of the present church and the road. The second building was a frame 
structure erected in 1882, when Rev. T. H. Strohecker was pastor. This 
building was dedicated September 7, 1883 by Pastor Strohecker, Dr. 
Samuel Rothrock, and others. 

A third building was undertaken by this congregation about 1910, 
which also was a frame structure. This church was started while Rev. 
W. A. Button was pastor, but was dedicated while Rev. J. B. Moose was 
in charge, on April 25, 1914. This building was destroyed by fire from 
lightning on July 22, 1930. 

The fourth building was constructed of brick. It was carried to 
completion without much delay, and was opened for services on Sunday 
morning, August 9, 1931. The sermon was by the pastor, Rev. E. R. 
Trexler. The cornerstone of the building was laid that same afternoon. 
The church was dedicated April 12, 1936. 

Sunday School rooms were added to the church a few years after 
the main building was completed. 

M. L. Carpenter, 1885-1891 C. R. Patterson, 1922-1926 

B. L. Westenberger, 1891-1895 J. L. Norris, 1927-1937 

J. H. Wannemacher, 1895-1899 A. W. Lippard, 1938-1942 



History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 



241 



Luther's congregation has an interest in the new parsonage at 
Richfield, which was built under the pastoral leadership of Rev. John 
L. Morgan. 

List of Pastors: 



Daniel Scherer, 1828-1830 
Jacob Kaempfer, 1830-1833 
H. Graeber, 1833-1841 
S. Rothrock, 1841-1845 
J. A. Linn, Sr., 1846-1852 
W. G. Harter, 1853-1856 
J. A. Linn, Sr., 1856-1863 
L. C. Groseclose, 1866-1867 
R. L. Brown, 1868-1874 
W. H. Cone, 1875-1877 
J. A. Linn, Jr., 1878-1880 
T. H. Strohecker, 1881-1886 
H. A. Trexler, 1886-1888 
S. Rothrock, 1888-1889 
C. C. Lyerly, 1891-1892 
J. H. C. Fisher, 1894-1896 
C. C. Lyerly, 1897-1898 



P. H. E. Derrick, 1898-1899 

P. L. Miller, 1899 

E. W. Leslie, Sup., 1901-1902 

C. L. T. Fisher, 1903 

C. R. Pless, 1903-1907 

W. A. Dutton, 1907-1912 

J. B. Moose, 1913-1914 

J. A. Linn, 1914-1915 

C. M. Fox, 1916-1918 

H. A. Trexler, 1920-1923 

B. D. Castor, Sup., 1925 
E. R. Trexler, 1927-1931 

C. Lee Shipton, 1934-1938 
P. E. Moose, 1938-1943 

J. L. Lackey, 1944-1947 
John L. Morgan, 1947- 



MACEDONIA, BURLINGTON 

Macedonia Church is located in the City of Burlington, in Alamance 
County. This church was organized by Rev. W. A. Julian, in 1869. The 
place was then called Company Shops, because the Southern Railroad 
shops were located there at that time. 

Synod met in Frieden's Church that year, when a petition from a 
group of Lutherans in Company Shops was presented to Synod, asking 
for a minister to come and organize a church at that place. The request 
was granted, and Pastor Julian was assigned to that field. 

The organization was soon effected, and the new church was 
received into Synod at a called meeting at Salem^ Church in Rowan 
County, in August that same year. 

The congregation worshiped in a union chapel for a number of 
years. But, during Rev. Whiston Kimball's pastorate, the congregation 
moved into its own house of worship. This was a small frame building, 
but served a fine purpose. A parsonage was built while Rev. C. B. Miller 
was pastor there which added stability to the cause. 

The present brick church was built in 1909, under the pastoral 
leadership of Rev. C. B. Cox. It was dedicated October 23, 1910, by Rev. 
V. Y, Boozer, President of Synod; Pastor Cox, and Dr. R. C. Holland. 

The Adjourned Meeting of the Merger Convention of the United 
Lutheran Synod of North Carolina was held in Macedonia Church, June 



242 History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 

8-10, 1921. The Parish Building Annex was built during Rev. H. P. 
Wyrick's pastorate, and was opened for occupancy January 18, 1925. 

Property for a playground was made possible by a generous gift 
from Mr. and Mrs. B. V. May, while Rev. Edward Fulenwider was pastor. 
The same year, when Rev. L. Boyd Hamm became pastor, the congregation 
purchased a new parsonage and converted the old one into a church 
office building. 

During the pastorate of Rev. J. L. Norris, the congregation has 
been accumulating a fund for a new church which they plan to build 
in the near future. 

List of Pastors: 

W. A. Julian, 1869-1870 C. B. Cox, 1904-1912 

Simeon Scherer, 1873-1876 C. I. Morgan, 1912-1913 

Whitson Kimball, 1876-1880 T. S. Brown, 1913-1922 

J. L. Buck, 1882-1887 H. P. Wyrick, 1922-1930 

Stu. C. A. Brown, 1889 E. Fulenwider, 1930-1940 

C. B. Miller, 1890-1895 L. Boyd Hamm, 1940-1946 

V. Y. Boozer, 1895-1898 L. D. Miller, Asst., 1942 

W. W. J. Ritchie, 1898-1903 J. L. Norris, 1947- 



MELANCHTHON, RANDOLPH CO. 

Melanchthon Church is located in Randolph County, five miles 
south from Liberty on the highway leading to Asheboro. 

The old Minutes of Synod give 1824 as the year when this church 
was organized. It was originally a part of Richland congregation, but 
withdrew on account of differences in teaching and practices, and formed 
a new congregation in connection with the Tennessee Synod. The new 
congregation kept the old name — Richland — and continued to worship 
in the same old church up until 1851. 

During 1850 a tract of land was secured where the church is now 
located, on which to build a new church. It was a :^rame building 
24 X 30 feet, which stood on the opposite side of the road from the present 
building. 

On August 9, 1851, a meeting was held in the new church, and the 
congregation was reorganized and called Melanchthon. Also Calvin C. 
Fox and Moses Ruth were elected and installed as Elders of the church. 

On Sunday, August 10, 1851, the church was dedicated by Rev. 
Thomas Crouse. Fifty years later — 1900 or 1901 — the present church 
was built. It is a nice frame structure about 30 x 50 feet. Rev. D. I. 
Offman was pastor at that time and helped to construct this building. He 
was present also in 1951 and preached their anniversary sermon. 

For a long time this church was in a parish with Coble's and Mt. 
Pleasant congregations. From 1921 to 1950 Melanchthon, Richland, and 



History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 243 

Grace congregations were together in the Randolph Parish. But after 
Grace assumed fulltime for its own pastor, Melanchthon has had only 
supply services. 

Rev. A. J. Fox, M.D., and Rev. Michael L. Fox, M.D., came from that 
congregation. 

List of Pastors: 

Daniel Moser, 1831 D. J. Settlemyre, 1903-1912 

C. G. Reitzel, 1835-1837 D. I. Offman, 1913-1921 

J. R. Moser, 1838 B. A. Barringer, 1922-1926 

Henry Goodman, 1844 Q. O. Lyerly, 1928-1936 

Thomas Grouse, 1848-1857 W. D. Yount, 1936-1937 

M. J. Stirewalt, 1859-1862 C. H. Fisher, 1937-1939 

Thomas Grouse, 1863-1866 J. G. Dickert, 1941-1946 

M. L. Fox, 1867-1889 J. R. Boggs, 1946-1948 

D. I. Offman, 1890-1902 R. B. Sigmon, 1949-1950 



MESSIAH, SALISBURY 

Messiah Lutheran Church is located on the corner of Lafayette and 
Boundary Streets in Salisbury. 

This section of Salisbury was surveyed in 1939 by Miss Juanita 
Horton, under the direction of the President of Synod. About 350 
Lutherans were found in that area, of whom only about one-half were 
members of churches in this city. 

In February 1942, the Mission Committee of Synod engaged Stu- 
dent Vance M. Daniel for weekend services and for fulltime work during 
summer vacation in this field. The first meeting was held in Cletus 
Fink's home, which was attended by five members of the local com- 
munity, together with Mr. Daniel and Mr. H. E. Isenhour, Secretary 
of the Mission Committee of Synod. 

At first, services were held in private homes or outdoors. Then 
the Synod purchased a vacant lot for that mission, and Easter services 
in 1942 were held on that lot with more than one hundred in attendance. 

The Lutheran churches of Rowan County together raised $1,800.00 
to help put up a frame building, and the local men did most of the 
carpenter work during off hours without charge. This building was 
opened for services on Sunday, August 16, 1942, at which time the 
church was organized with 87 members. The service was in charge of 
Mr. Daniel, assisted by officers of the Mission Committee. 

When Mr. Daniel completed his seminary school work, he was 
called as regular pastor here, effective June 1, 1943, and served until 
1944. 

Rev. J. Wilford Lyerly became pastor June 1, 1944. Plans for a 
much needed larger church were made, but war conditions delayed the 
building program. Finally, on March 11, 1950, the contract for a new 



244 History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 

church was signed, and on the 19th of the same month groundbreaking 
services were held in charge of Pastor Lyerly, President F. L. Conrad, 
and Dr. J. L. Morgan. 

The cornerstone was laid July 9, 1950 by President Conrad, Pastor 
Lyerly, and Dr. Morgan. 

This is a brick building of English Gothic design, with full base- 
ment, and an Educational Annex. The total cost for the church and 
its furnishings is approximately $68,000.00. The Loan and Gift Fund of 
Synod enabled the congregation to carry the building to completion. 

The completed church was opened for services on Sunday, March 
18, 1951. The service was in charge of Pastor Lyerly and President F. 
L. Conrad preached the sermon. Greetings were given at the after- 
noon service by the various auxiliaries which had contributed to the 
construction of the church. 

The Lutherans of Rowan County and a host of friends contributed 
towards the building of this splendid house of worship, which is meeting 
a spiritual need in this area of the city. 

List of Pastors: 
Vance M. Daniel, 1942-1944 J. Wilford Lyerly, 1944- 



MORNING STAR, MECKLENBURG CO. 

Morning Star Lutheran Church is located in Mecklenburg County, 
about three miles northeast of the town of Matthews, in a rural area. 

We do not know when this church was organized, or who started it. 
However, in the old records of St. John's Church in Cabarrus County, 
we find that Rev. Adam N. Marcard, who was pastor of St. John's from 
1797 to 1800, served this church in connection with St. John's congre- 
gation. He recorded some of his official acts for Morning Star, then call- 
ed Crooked Creek Church, in the St. John's Record Book, from which we 
quote the following: "As deacons in the congregation at Crooked Creek, 
I (A. N. Marcard) installed on November 11, 1798, Conrad Cramm and 
John Herche. Also, on that day the church there was dedicated by me." 

Pastor Marcard goes on to record in St. John's Record Book the 
following further statement: "On November 11, 1798, there went to the 
communion at Crooked Creek, Conrad Cramm, George Fischer, Adam 
Fischer, Andrew Wenss, Mary Fischer, Katherine Wenss, Mary Fischer, 
Mary Magdalene Cramm, Nicholas Pfeiffer, David Pfeiffer, Peter Pfeiffer, 
Maria Magdalene Wenss, and Lydia Wenss." 

Many of the names recorded as of Crooked Creek by Rev. Marcard 
at St. John's are found on the old Record Book of Morning Star. By 
reference to a map, it will be seen that Morning Star is located near 
one of the upper branches of Crooked Creek, hence the name for the 
church. 



History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 



245 



All this substantiates three things: 

1. There was an organized church at Crooked Creek as early as 
1798. 

2. There was a house of worship there. 

3. The names and records identify this Crooked Creek with the 
present Morning Star Church. 

A few years later the church is referred to as McCobbin's Creek. 
This may be intended for McAlpine Creek in that vicinity. However, 
in 1815 McCobbin's Church was enrolled as a member of Synod and two 
delegates from that church were enrolled — Jacob Long and John 
Harkey, from Morning Star Church. This identifies McCobbin's Church 
as Morning Star. 

We do not know who served the church after 1800 to 1815. In 
1815 and for four years, David Henkel visited the congregation and 
preached, baptized children and adults, gave communion, etc. (See 
Morning Star Church Records.) 

The church was first located nearly one mile east from the 
present church. The place is marked by the old graveyard. 

The first building, which Rev. Mr. Marcard dedicated on Novem- 
ber 11, 1798, was on the old lot, and was built of logs. How long it was 
used, or why they relocated, we do not know. The second building also 
was a log structure, but it was on the present lot. No one seems to 
know when it was built. However, the third or present church was 
constructed in 1906. It is a frame building and is still in good condition. 

In 1951, the congregation, encouraged by their pastor, the Rev. 
C. E. Norman, fitted up two Sunday School class rooms in the rear portion 
of the nave, with a vestibule in between. This church has for many 
years been associated in a parish with St. Luke's congregation in 
Monroe, where for decades the different pastors have lived. 

This was the home church of Rev. Irenaeus Conder, a highly es- 
teemed minister of this Synod, who served in that capacity from 1861 to 
1928 — three score and seven years. 



List of Pastors: 



A. N. Marcard, 1797-1800 
David Henkel, 1815-1818 
David Henkel, 1830 
Nehemiah Bonham, 1831 
Adam Miller, Jr., 1831-1832 
Henry Goodman, Adam Miller, 
Jr., A. J. Fox, and 
A. J. Brown, 1833-1839 
Ephraim Rudisill, 1840-1855 
Jacob Killian, 1840-1855 
Timothy Moser, 1856 
Christian Moretz, 1860 
M. Q. Boland, 1902 



G. D. Bernheim, 1905-1907 
R. H. Cline, 1907-1910 
W. J. Boger, 1913-1918 
P. L. Miller, 1920-1922 
J. E. Stockman, 1923-1925 
J. D. Sheppard, 1929-1931 
C. R. Pless, 1931-1934 
C. V. Deal, 1934-1941 
F. K. Efird, 1941-1943 
H. D. Hawthorne, 1943-1944 
H. F. Lineberger, 1945-1949 
C. E. Norman, 1949- 



246 



History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 



MT. CALVARY, CLARE MONT 

Mt. Calvary Church is located in Catawba County, in the town of 
Claremont. 

This church was organized on April 20, 1902, in the Wike School 
House with 29 charter members by Rev. R. A. Yoder, D.D. The first 
officers were: J. H. C. Hewitt, A. L. Hewitt, George Yount, and R. L. 
Smyre. A lot for the church was donated by George Yount. 

Construction on their first house of worship was begun in July 
1902, and the building was completed in 1903. This was a frame 
structure. The first service in the new church was on Sunday, January 
18, 1903, by Pastor Yoder. 

The building was dedicated November 15, 1903, free of indebted- 
ness. Rev. J. C. Moser, D.D. preached the sermon and Dr. Yoder dedicated 
the church. 

In 1912, while Rev. W. D. Wise was pastor, two Sunday School 
rooms were added to the building. Plans for a new parsonage were de- 
veloped while Rev. J. J. Bickley was pastor, which was constructed during 
Rev. S. L. Nease's pastorate. A Sunday School Annex was built about 
1928. 

During Rev. R. B. Sigmon's pastorate, a contract was signed on 
September 15, 1939 for their new brick house of worship and Education 
Building. The building was completed and opened for divine services by 
March 31, 1940. The cornerstone was laid on the opening day by Pastor 
Sigmon and President J. L. Morgan, who preached the sermon for the 
occasion. 

This building cost approximately $20,000.00. It was dedicated, 
free of debt, January 31, 1943, by their pastor, Rev. R. B. Sigmon, and 
the President of Synod. 

A new pipe organ was installed in 1946, while Rev. G. A. Phillips 
was pastor there at a cost of $4,500.00. Soon after the coming of their 
present pastor. Rev. L. O. Dasher, a new parsonage was built in 1948, 
at a cost of $22,500.00. 

List of Pastors: 



R. A. Yoder, 1902-1905 
J. A. Arndt, 1906-1908 
W. D. Wise, 1908-1911 
J. C. Moser, 1911 
W. D. Wise, 1912-1918 
J. J. Bickley, 1918-1920 
E. J. Sox, Sup., 1920-1921 
S. L. Nease, 1921-1924 



Stu. H. J. Rhyne and Dr. 
J. C. Peery, Sup. 1924-1925 
J. C. Deitz, 1925-1927 
Stu. A. K. Hewitt, Sup., 

1927-1928 
R. B. Sigmon, 1928-1943 
G. A. Phillips, 1944-1947 
L. O. Dasher, 1947- 



History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 247 



MT. GILEAD, CABARRUS CO. 

Mt. Gilead Church is located in Cabarrus County, three miles east 
of Mt. Pleasant, on the Albemarle highway. This church is the successor 
of two former congregations which, in the year 1887, merged to form 
one church. 

The older of these two congregations was Lutheran Union Church, 
located two miles south of the present church. This congregation be- 
longed to the Tennessee Synod, but we do not know when it was first 
organized. Dates of deaths carved on grave stones go as far back 
as 1835. The building, being of wood, decayed years ago, but the walled- 
in graveyard marks the location. 

The other of those two churches was Mt. Carmel, located a mile 
west of Lutheran Union, and two miles southeast of Mt. Pleasant. This 
congregation belonged to the North Carolina Synod. It was received into 
Synod at the meeting in Newton in 1853. This was a frame building 
which has been removed, leaving only the burying ground to mark 
the place. 

A joint meeting of those two congregations was held January 1, 
1887, and they agreed to merge into one congregation. By a ma- 
jority vote of one, it was decided to unite with the Tennessee Synod, 
and it was also decided to call the merged congregation Luther Union 
and worship at that place. However, services were held at Mt. Carmel 
for some years after this merger. 

At a congregational meeting on January 19, 1889, it was decided 
to build a new church on the main highway and call it Mt. Gilead 
Lutheran Church. So, a frame building was started early in 1889 and 
was completed in December 1890. The church was dedicated April 12, 
1891 by the pastor, Rev. J. P. Price. 

This building was remodeled in 1911, while Rev. L. D. Miller was 
pastor, and again in 1935, while Rev. J. W. Link was pastor. It was re- 
dedicated on November 3, 1935. On October 30, 1949 a Sunday School 
Annex and a number of new furnishings were dedicated by Rev. E. 
Fulenwider, D.D., pastor; and Dr. J. L. Morgan. 

On October 28, 1951, their new Martin Luther Hahn Memorial Sun- 
day School Building was dedicated. 

List of Pastors: 

Timothy Moser, 1887-1888 C. A. Linn, 1922-1923 

J. P. Price, 1888-1900 C. L. T. Fisher, 1923-1925 

W. H. Little, 1900-1901 J. H. C. Fisher, Sup., 1926-1932 

J. F. Deal, 1902-1906 R. B. Fisher, Sup., 1933 

H. L. Seagle, 1906-1908 J. W. Link, 1933-1947 

L. D. Miller, 1909-1918 E. Fulenwider, Sup., 1947- 

D. L. Miller, 1919-1921 



248 History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 
mt. hebron, hilderbran 

Mt. Hebron Church is located in Burke County, in the town of 
Hildebran. 

This church was organized September 12, 1903 in Mr. M. E. Rusi- 
sill's Boarding House at Henry River with 16 members by Rev. J. C. 
Moser, D.D. Officers elected were: M. L. Aderholdt, D. W. Aderholdt, 
and M. E. Rudisill. 

Services were held in a store building, at Henry River, for some 
time. But in 1918 the congregation moved its place of worship to the 
nearby town of Hildebran and held services in a school building until 
the church was ready for use. A lot was secured there, and work 
begun on the church building in 1920. It was completed in 1922 at a 
cost of $10,000.00. It was dedicated at a meeting of conference there, 
March 22, 1923, by Dr. J. L. Morgan, President of Synod; assisted by 
Pastor F. K. Roof, Rev. W. A. Deaton, D.D., and Rev. Enoch Hite. 

In 1938 this church assumed full support of its pastor, when Rev. 
J. Wilford Lyerly was called as pastor. During his administration, in 
the year 1941, a Parish Educational Building was started, which was 
completed the following year and was dedicated September 6, 1942. 
The cornerstone was laid in connection with this same service, all in 
charge of Pastor Lyerly, assisted by Dr. W. A. Deaton, and Dr. J. L. 
Morgan. The Sunday School used this new school building for the first 
time this day, to the joy of everyone present. Mr. H. E. Isenhour made 
a talk to the School on this occasion. 

The church nave was refinished in this same building project. 
The whole program amounted to approximately $10,600.00. 

A modern ten room brick veneer parsonage was built under 
Pastor R. D. Fritz's leadership in 1952 at a cost of approximately 
$21,000.00. 

List of Pastors: 

J. C. Moser, 1903-1904 Supplied, 1927-1929 

J. L. Cromer, 1905-1907 S. L. Sox, 1929-1932 

J. P. Price, 1907-1913 E. J. Sox, Sup., 1932 

W. A. Deaton, 1913-1920 D. P. Rudisill, 1932-1938 

F. K. Roof, 1920-1924 J. W. Lyerly, 1938-1944 

Stu. E. R. Lineberger, 1924 F. C. Morehead, 1944-1950 

W. A. Craun, 1924-1927 R. D. Fritz, 1950- 



MT. HERMAN, CONCORD 

Mt. Herman Church is located in Cabarrus County, three miles 
south of Concord, on the highway to Monroe. Services were held in 
this community as far back as 1868 by Rev. G. D. Bernheim and others 
at intervals. In 1880, Rev. S. T. Hallman, then pastor of St. James 



History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 



249 



Church in Concord, began holding services regularly at afternoon hours. 

Soon a lot for a church was secured, and on February 8, 1881, the 
cornerstone of a new frame church was laid by Pastor Hallman. The 
congregation was organized April 17, 1881 with twenty-five members. 
The church was dedicated April 15, 1888 by Rev. A. D. L. Moser, then 
pastor of the congregation. 

The church was completely overhauled in 1941, under the direction 
of Rev. P. G. Kinney, their pastor. The building was brick veneered, and 
new furniture installed. The church was rededicated November 23, 1941 
by Pastor Kinney and the President of Synod, v/ith greetings from other 
ministers. 

A new brick veneer parsonage was built in 1947-1948 on a lot 
near the church, which was given by one of their members for that 
purpose. It was dedicated November 19, 1950 by Pastor Leroy C. 
Trexler, President F. L. Conrad, and Dr. J. L. Morgan. 



List of Pastors: 



S. T. Hallman, 1880-1883 
G. F. Schaeffer, 1884 
Whitson Kimball, 1884-1886 
A. D. L. Moser, 1886-1888 
J. M. Hedrick, 1888-1893 
P. Miller, 1893-1894 
J. D. Shealy, 1894-1895 
H. A. McCullough, 1895-1898 
W. B. Oney, 1898-1900 
C. A. Brown, 1900-1901 
Stu. J. L. Morgan, 1901 
E. Fulenwider, 1902-1904 
J. W. Strickler, 1905-1907 
C. R. Pless, 1907 
V. R. Stickley, 1907-1908 
J. P. Miller, Sup., 1909 



C. R. Pless, 1909-1911 
C. A. Brown, Sup., 1912 
G. O. Ritchie, Sup., 1912 
H. A. Zimbeck, 1912-1914 
C. P. MacLaughlin, Sup., 

1914-1916 
L. D. Miller, Sup., 1916-1918 
J. B. Moose, 1919-1923 
L. D. Miller, Sup., 1924-1925 
J. H. C. Fisher, 1925-1930 
J. W. Iddings, 1930-1938 
P. G. Kinney, 1938-1943 
L. C. Hahn, 1943-1947 
J. L. Lackey, 1947-1949 
L. C. Trexler, 1949-1951 
J. P. Rimmer, 1952- 



MT. HERMAN, IREDELL CO. 

Mt. Herman Church is located in Iredell County, about six miles 
west of Statesville on the Lookout Shoals Road. This church was 
organized July 26, 1896 by Rev. W. L. Darr, their first pastor, with 
thirty-eight members. Rufus P. Pope, Davidson Eller, and W. I. Warren 
were elected Elders, and Quincey A. Hoover and J. S. Morrison were elect- 
ed Deacons. 

Mr. Q. A. Hoover donated the first lot in 1896, which was en- 
larged by purchasing one-half acre in 1940. The first church was a 
frame building, about 30 x 45 feet, erected the same year in which the 
congregation was organized. 

The present building was constructed in 1941, while Rev. W. H. 
Dutton was pastor. The old building was moved back and forms a part 



250 History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 

of the new plant. The nave is all new, and the entire building is brick 
veneered. Sunday School rooms are fitted up in the old part. This 
church was dedicated on Sunday, August 23, 1942, by Pastor Button, 
and the President of Synod. 

The old frame parsonage was sold in 1950, and a new brick home 
for the pastor was built in 1951, near the church, at a cost of $12,000.00, 
which is owned jointly by Mt. Herman and Sharon congregations. The 
parsonage was built under the leadership of Student Pastor E. W. 
Ridenhour, who later became regular pastor. 

List of Pastors: 

W. L. Darr, 1896-1906 J. L. Thornburg and Stu. 

C. J. Sox, 1907-1910 Roscoe Fisher, Sup., 1932 
W. D. Haltiwanger, 1911-1917 O. G. Swicegood, 1933-1935 
J. M. Senter, 1918-1821 P. E. Moose, 1935-1938 

D. L. Miller, 1921-1924 W. H. Button, 1939-1943 
W. C. Bolick, Sup., 1924 R. M. Carpenter, 1943-1950 
Q. O. Lyerly, 1925-1928 Stu. E. W. Ridenhour, 1950 
R. H. Kepley, 1930-1932 E. W. Ridenhour, 1951- 



MT. MORIAH, CHINA GROVE 

Mt. Moriah Church is located in Rowan County, near the north- 
western border of the town of Landis. 

The church was organized on Becember 30, 1824 by Rev. Bavid 
Henkel, with seventeen members. These members originally belonged 
to Lutheran Chapel. However, the newly organized group continued to 
worship in Lutheran Chapel for about fifteen or more years. 

On June 17, 1839, the congregation bought four acres of land 
from Noah Partee for $6.75, a little north of where the present church 
stands, on which their first house of worship was built. It was a frame 
structure 24 x 30 feet and was completed and opened for services in 
1840. 

In 1880, under the pastoral ledearship of Rev. J. C. Moser, a new 
frame church, 40 x 50 feet, was built. In 1917, while Rev. J. S. Wessinger 
was pastor, an extension of 10 feet by 30 feet wide was added to the 
building and a steeple constructed with the doors in the front of the 
building. At a congregational meeting May 20, 1928, it was decided 
to build a new brick church. While the new building was under con- 
struction. Rev. Enoch Hite and his congregation held services in the 
Landis High School auditorium. The cornerstone was laid May 4, 
1929. the church was opened for services on May 5, 1929. It was 
dedicated July 21, 1929 by the President of Synod and Pastor Hite. A 
Hammond organ was installed by Rev. E. Ray Trexler, November 
20, 1938. 

The congregation owns a parsonage on the main highway be- 
tween China Grove and Landis. Mr. George W. Bostian willed a tract 



History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 



251 



of land to Mt. Moriah Church before entering the Civil War, where he 
was killed June 5, 1864. Also, Mrs. Mary M. Hess willed three tracts 
to this church before her death. The church has since come into 
possession of these properties. 



List of Pastors; 



David Henkel, 1823 
Ambrose Henkel and 
Daniel Moser, Sup., 1824 
Philip Henkel and 

Christian Moretz, Sup., 1825 
Daniel Moser, 1826-1829 
Nehemiah Bonham, 1830 
Philip Henkel, Geo. Easterly, 

and D. Miller, Sup., 1831 
D. Moser, J. N. Stirewalt, 

A. Miller, H. Goodman, and 

Philip Henkel, Sup., 1832 
Philip Henkel, Sup., 1833 
J. N. Stirewalt, 1834-1836 
Jacob Killian, 1837 
A. J. Fox, 1838 
Vacant, 1839-1840 
J. W. Hull, 1841-1842 
J. M. Wagner, 1848 
Adam Efird, 1851-1852 



No Record, 1853-1860 

I. Conder, 1861 

D. S. Henkel, 1867-1869 

J. R. Peterson, Sup., 1871 

J. C. Moser, 1874-1881 

D. J. Settlemyre, 1883-1886 

R. H. Cline, 1887-1889 

A. L. Boliek, Sup., 1890 

J. L. Deaton, 1891-1892 

D. J. Settlemyre, 1892-1894 

J. P. Miller, 1895-1899 

J. L. Deaton, 1900-1902 

D. I. Offman, 1903-1913 

C. H. Pence, 1913-1914 

E. Z. Pence, Sup., 1915 

J. S. Wessinger, 1915-1928 
Enoch Hite, 1928-1931 
O. G. Swicegood, Sup., 1931 
E. R. Trexler, 1931-1950 
W. D. Moser, 1950-1952 

D. W. Zipperer, 1953- 



MT. OLIVE, CABARRUS CO. 

Mt. Olive Church is located in Cabarrus County, five miles north 
of Mt. Pleasant in No. 6 Township. The church was organized April 
28, 1878, with forty-seven members, by Rev. R. W. Petrea, then pastor 
of St. John's Church. Mr. John Moose offered a lot at the Moose School 
House, and some lumber was placed there for a church, but it was 
later decided to locate where the church now stands. 

A frame church, 40 x 50 feet, was started August 24, 1878, and was 
ready for services April 20, 1879. It was dedicated November 3, 1879. 
The work on the building was done largely by the laymen themselves, 
of whom special mention is made of Mr. Isaac Beaver. In course of 
time the building was remodeled, and the entrance placed in the opposite 
end of the original building. In 1949 Mr. and Mrs. Ray W. Cline helped 
the congreagtion to rearrange the nave of the church, and install new 
furniture. 

Since 1895 this congregation has been in a parish with St. Stephen's 
— the parsonage being located at the latter place. 



List of Pastors; 



R. W. Petrea, 1878-1882 
W. Kimball, 1882-1883 



C. P. Fisher, Sup., 1910 
G. H. L. Lingle, 1910-1914 



252 



History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 



J. B. Davis, 1884-1885 

Vacant, 1885-1886 

A. D. L. Moser, 1887 

G. H. Cox, 1888-1894 

J. Q. Wertz, Sup., 1894 

P. H. E. Derrick, 1895-1896 

S. D. Steffey, Sup., 1896-1897 

C. L. Miller, Sup., 1897 

George A. Riser, 1898-1899 

W. A. Dutton, 1900-1907 

H. E. H. Sloop, 1907-1909 



C. M. Fox, 1914-1916 
C. P. Fisher, Sup., 1916 
M. L. Ridenhour, 1917-1919 
M. L. Kester, 1919-1921 
Earl K. Bodie, 1921-1924 
J. A. Yount, 1924-1926 
W. H. Dutton, 1927-1938 
C. A. Misenheimer, 1939-1943 
G. A. Miller, 1944-1950 
G. C. Cruse, 1951- 



MT. OLIVE, HICKORY 

Mt. Olive Church is located in Catawba County about three miles 
north of Hickory on Highway No. 127. The church was organized in 
1885 by Rev. D. C. Huffman and was received into the Tennessee Synod 
at a meeting in Holly Grove Church, November 9, 1889. Land for the 
church was donated by Nelson Huffman sometime after the organi- 
zation and their first church was built about that time. It was a small 
frame building located about where the present church stands. 

The second church was a brick building 32 x 52 feet, erected in 
1901, under the pastoral direction of Rev. E. J. Sox, D.D. The brick for 
the building were handmade by members of the congregation, in 
1919, this building was struck by lightning and burned; however, the 
furniture was saved. The congregation worshiped in the Fairview 
School House until the church was rebuilt. The new building, which 
also was of brick, was constructed in 1920-1921. This church was 
dedicated October 9, 1921 by the Pastor, Rev. Enoch Hite, and Dr. J. C. 
Peery. 

While Rev. C. N. Yount was pastor there, an Educational unit 
was added and was opened for occupancy November 25, 1934. 

A house and lot, near the church, was purchased after Rev. J. A. 
Linn became pastor and was fitted up for a parsonage. The first par- 
sonage was on the highway toward Hickory, about one mile south 
from' the church. 



List of Pastors: 



D. C. Huffman, 1885 
P. C. Henkel, 1889 

A. L. Crouse, 1890-1893 
W. P. Cline, 1893-1898 

E. J. Sox, 1899-1901 
W. P. Cline, 1901-1904 
W. A. Lutz, Sup., 1905 
R. A. Yoder, 1905 

C. L. Miller, 1905-1910 



J. D. Mauney, 1910-1914 
E. J. Sox, 1914-1920 
Enoch Hite, 1920-1925 
C. N. Yount, 1925-1935 
John Ritchie, 1935-1937 
W. A. Sigmon, 1937-1942 
J. D. Mauney, Jr., 1943-1945 
John Hall, Sup., 1945 
J. Arthur Linn, 1946-1952 



History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 253 



MT. PLEASANT, ALAMANCE CO. 

Mt. Pleasant Church is located in Alamance County about one- 
half mile south of the Graham-Liberty highway, seven miles from 
Graham. 

This church was organized about 1820, from members of St. Paul's 
Church, several miles away. The organization took place in Fogle- 
man's School House, which was located near where its present church 
stands. The charter membership comprised twenty-seven adult members. 

The first two buildings were log structures, which stood a short 
distance from where the present church is located, but on the opposite 
side of the cemetery. The present frame building was erected in the 
year 1908. The congregation had all along been in a parish with Coble's 
and Melanchthon churches until about 1940, when St. Paul's and Mt. 
Pleasant were placed in a parish together. This arrangement is still 
in operation, with Rev. P. G. Kinney pastor. 

Rev. D. I. Offman served this church for a total of about forty 
years; however, its pastoral connection shifted somewhat during that 
time. 

The pastors for this church have been practically the same as 
the ones for Coble's, up until about 1940. 

List of Pastors: 

Philip Henkel, Sup., 1825 Thomas Crouse, 1863-1866 

Daniel Moser, 1831 M. L. Fox, 1867-1889 

C. G. Reitzel, 1835-1837 D. L Offman, 1890-1902 

J. R. Moser, 1838 D. J. Settlemyre, 1903-1912 

Henry Goodman, 1844 D. L Offman, 1913-1946 

Thomas Crouse, 1848-1857 C. Lee Shipton, Sup., 1947-1949 

M. J. Stirewalt, 1859-1862 P. G. Kinney, 1949- 



MT. PLEASANT, WATAUGA CO. 

Mt. Pleasant Church is located in Watauga County, nine miles 
northeast of Boone. The original location was two miles west of the 
present site, where Old Mt. Pleasant is located. 

This church was originally organized by Rev. Jonathan R. Moser 
about 1845, in the Jackson School House, hence it was called the Jack- 
son Church. John Moretz, Sr. and James Davis were chosen as the first 
councilmen. For some years services were held in school buildings 
and private homes by visiting ministers, among whom were: Revs. 
Jonathan Moser, A. J. Fox, Timothy Moser, Adam Efird, and Henry 
Goodman. Rev. Goodman was their first regular pastor. 

In the late fifties Jordan Councill donated a lot for a church, and 
some preparation was made to build, and the name of the church was 
changed to Mt. Pleasant. But when the Civil War started, all efforts to 
build stopped until the war was over. Then, in 1868 a frame church 



254 History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 



was constructed. This building was remodeled while Rev. J. L. Deaton 
was pastor. 

A second building was dedicated July 31, 1910 by the pastor, Rev. 
H. A. Kistler. On Sunday, January 4, 1920, this building was destroyed 
by fire. 

Following this loss, the pastor, Rev. N. D. Yount, and certain 
members of the congregation, secured a lot two miles east of the 
original one and erected a frame structure there during the year 1923. 
Meantime, the other members built a new church at the old grounds, 
and called it Old Mt. Pleasant. 

Meanwhile, a new parsonage was built by the parish near the 
Mt. Pleasant Church, under the supervision of Rev. H. W. Jeffcoat, which 
was destroyed by fire in 1951. In 1952, under the leadership of Pastor 
H. C. Linn, a new parsonage was erected at a cost of $10,200. 



List of Pastors: 



J. R. Moser, 1845 

Timothy Moser 

Henry Goodman, 1849-1852 

Christian Moretz, 1852-1868 

A. J. Fox, 1869 

Henry Goodman, 1870-1872 

J. R. Peterson, Sup., 1872 

J. M. Smith, Sup., 1872 

G. L. Hunt, 1874-1876 

P. C. Henkel, 1880 

R. A. Yoder, 1881 

D. A. Goodman, 1881-1882 

M. L. Little, Sup., 1882 

P. C. Henkel, Sup., 1883 

P. C. Wike and C. H. 

Bernheim, Sup., 1883-1884 
J. A. Rudisill, Sup., 1884 
P. C. Henkel, W. P. Cline, and 

R. H. Cline, Sup., 1885 
D. A. Goodman, 1887 
R. A. Yoder and Jeff 

Miller, Sup., 1888 
J. A. Rudisill and J. C. 

Moser, Sup., 1889 
Jacob Wike, 1890-1891 
J. A. Rudisill and J. C. 

Wessinger, Sup., 1892 
J. C. Deitz, 1893 



G. L. Hunt, J. C. Moser and 

J. L. Deaton, Sup., 1895 
J. L. Deaton, 1896-1897 
P. C. Wike, Jacob Wike, and 

J. L. Cromer, Sup., 1898 
J. L. Deaton, 1900 

E. J. Sox, 1901 
John Hall, 1901-1905 

J. Morehead, Sup., 1903 
H. A. Kistler, 1905-1910 
J. A. Yount, 1911-1912 
B. L. Stroup and A. L. 

Boliek, Sup., 1912 
M. L. Carpenter, 1913-1918 
N. D. Yount, 1918-1923 
H. W. Jeffcoat, 1923-1925 
W. A. Deaton, 1925-1932 
O. G. Swicegood, Sup., 1932 
D. F. Swicegood, Sup., 1933 
J. A. Yount, Sup., 1933-1934 
H. A. Kistler, 1934-1937 
J. A. Yount, 1938-1939 
J. A. Yount, Sup., 1940-1942 
H. B. Leonard, 1943-1944 
H. H. Ritchie, 1944-1946 

F. M. Speagle, 1947-1951 
H. C. Linn, 1951- 



MT. ZION, RICHFIELD 

Mt. Zion Church is located in the town of Richfield, in Stanly 
County. This work was started by Rev. C. C. Lyerly while pastor of 
Bethel and Luther's Churches. The congregation was organized, with 
thirty members, on October 12, 1895, and the cornerstone was laid the 



History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 255 

same day. Rev. B. S. Brown, Sr., President of Synod, and Pastor Lyerly 
were in charge of the services. Dr. J. D. Shirey, President of N. C. 
College, was also present. 

In 1929, their frame building was remodeled, brick veneered, and 
refinished throughout, and class rooms added. The cornerstone for this 
building was laid October 9, 1929, by the President of Synod, Pastor 
E. Ray Trexler, and Rev. C. P. Fisher, Sr. The cost was around $10,000.00. 
The church was dedicated January 6, 1935, by the President of Synod, 
Pastor C. Lee Shipton, and Rev. E. Ray Trexler. 

About twenty-five years ago the Richfield Parish — Mt. Zion, 
Luther's, and New Bethel congregations — bought a parsonage, but they 
sold it and built a new one during 1948-1949, at a cost of $15,000.00. 
This new home for the pastor was made possible by the leadership of 
their pastor. Rev. John L. Morgan. The building was dedicated October 
2, 1949. In 1952 a Parish Building was erected. 

List of Pastors: 

C. C. Lyerly, 1895-1897 C. M. Fox, 1916-1918 

J. A. Linn, 1898-1902 H. A. Trexler, 1920-1924 

F. B. Kuntz, 3 mos. Sup., 1903 B. D. Castor, 3 mos. Sup., 1925 

C. R. Pless, 3 mos. Sup., 1903 E. R. Trexler, 1927-1931 

Charlie Fisher, 6 mos. Sup., 1904 C. Lee Shipton, Sup., 1932-1934 

C. R. Pless, 1904-1907 C. Lee Shipton, 1934-1938 

W. A. Button, 1907-1912 P. E. Moose, 1938-1943 

J. B. Moose, 1913-1914 J. L. Lackey, 1944-1947 

J. A. Linn, 1914-1915 John L. Morgan, 1947- 



MT. ZION, WATAUGA CO. 

Mt. Zion Church is located at Meat Camp in Watauga County, 
about four miles northeast from Boone. The church was organized 
in 1896 by Rev. J. L. Beaton, while he was pastor of the Watauga 
Parish. 

The first building was a small frame structure. The cornerstone 
for it was laid October 10, 1896, by Pastor Beaton. The second building 
was erected in 1940 while Rev. J. A. Yount was pastor. The lot was 
given by Mr. William Winebarger. The formal cornerstone laying took 
place June 18, 1950, and the church was dedicated the same day by Br. 
F. L. Conrad, President of Synod. 

List of Pastors: 

J. L. Beaton, 1896-1897 W. A. Beaton, Sup., 1934 

John Hall, 1901-1905 H. A. Kistler, 1934-1937 

H. A. Kistler, 1906-1910 J. A. Yount, 1939-1940 

Vacant, 1911-1912 John Hall, Sup., 1942 

J. A. Yount, 1912-1913 H. B. Leonard, 1943-1944 

M. L. Carpenter, 1913-1917 H. H. Ritchie, 1944-1946 

N. B. Yount, 1918-1923 F. M. Speagle, 1947-1951 

H. W. Jeffcoat, 1923-1925 H. C. Linn, 1951- 
W. A. Beaton, 1925-1931 



256 History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 



NAZARETH CHURCH, RURAL HALL 

Nazareth Lutheran Church is located at Rural Hall, in Forsyth 
County. This church was organized by Rev. Adolph Nussmann, about 
the year 1778. Dr. G. D. Bernheim, in his History of German Settlers 
and the Lutheran Church in the Carolinas, says: "Rev. Mr. Nussmann 
made a number of missionary tours to Davidson, Guilford, Orange, 
Stokes, and Forsyth Counties, organizing Lutheran congregations, and 
serving them occasionally, particularly in the last two mentioned 
counties." 

The Minutes of Synod for 1831, page 8, says: "Mr. Nussman, 
weak as he was, established two congregations in Surry (now Forsyth) 
County, and instructed and confirmed old and young. 

In a recent History of Forsyth County, page 129, it is stated that, 
"Hermanus (Harmon) Miller entered one hundred acres of land in 
Surry County, lying on a branch of Beaver Dam Creek . . . January 3, 
1778." This is thought to be the same tract of land referred to in the 
old Church Record Book, which is said to have been deeded to the 
church by Mr. A. Kiger, on condition that the congregation pay him 
for the entrance fee. 

This seems to indicate that this work was started about 1778, 
which is the date on the cornerstone of the present church. It shows 
too that the congregaion was at first called Beaver Dam Church, how- 
ever it is known to have been referred to by old people as the Old Dutch 
Meeting House. 

Cox and Bernheim, in their History of the North Carolina Synod, 
say, that for a long time this congregation worshiped in a school 
house, then a log church was built on the land deeded by Mr. Kiger, 
and finally, a brick church 35 x 45 was built under the pastoral leader- 
ship of Rev. W. A. Lutz, in the year 1878, just one hundred years after 
the church was organized. This church was formally dedicated on 
November 27, 1879. 

The congregation sold ninety-two acres of its land in 1863, in- 
tending to use the money from it in the building of a new church, but 
the money was misappropriated, so the building had to be delayed. 

The present parsonage was built in 1893, while Rev. H. A. Trexler 
was pastor there. It has been remodeled and improved in recent years. 
Sunday School rooms were built to the church in 1934, during Rev. 
W. N. Yount's pastoral services there. Since the coming of Rev. B. E, 
Petrea, D.D., as pastor, the church building and grounds, including 
the grave-yard, have been greatly improved. 

During its earlier years, this congregation had to carry on with- 
out a regular pastor, which retarded its developments. In the History 
of Forsyth County, page 130, we read: "There was a scarcity of Lutheran 
ministers from 1796 for some years, so that Moravian ministers served 
this congregation by request." 

In 1810, Rev. Gottlieb Schober, whose home was in Salem, was 
ordained by the North Carolina Synod, and accepted a call to this 
parish, where he continued a general oversight for many years, to the 



History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 



257 



betterment of this work. It has been out of the question, at this late 
day, to produce a full or accurate list of the pastors who served this 
congregation, however the following ministers are believed to have 
preached here. 

List of Pastors: 



Adolph Nussmann, 1774-1787 H. M. 

J. G. Arends, 1787-1788 H. A. 

Arnold Roschen, 1788-1800 R. L. 

Paul Henkel, 1800-1805 P. E. 

Moravian Supply, 1806-1810 C. A. 

G. Schober, 1810-1830 V. R. 

D. P. Rosenmiller, 1830-1832 J. W. 
Adam Grimes, 1832-1836 J. A. 
Jacob Crim, 1837-1840 R. T. 
Adam Grimes, 1837-1847 W. C 
J. Swicegood, 1847-1853 C. E. 
Whitson Kimball, 1860-1861 R. L. 
M. M. Miller, 1861 W. J. 
J. R. Sikes, 1862-1864 O. W 
J. D. Bowles, 1865 W. N. 
J. Swicegood, 1865-1867 W. N. 
C. H. Bernheim, 1877-1878 W. D. 
W. A. Lutz, 1878-1880 D. B. 

E. P. Parker, 1882-1887 L. O. 
W. R. Ketchie, 1887-1888 B. E. 



Brown, 1888-1892 
Trexler, 1892-1897 
Bame, 1897-1899 

Monroe, Sup., 1900 
Phillips, 1902-1904 
Stickley, 1906 

Strickler, 1907-1909 
L. Miller, 1909-1914 
Troutman, Sup., 1916 

Buck, 1917-1925 

Lutz, Sup., 1925 
Fisher, Sup., 1926 
Moretz, 1927-1931 
. Sink, Sup., 1932 

Yount, Sup., 1933-1934 

Yount, 1935-1940 

Yount, 1940-1941 
Summers, 1942-1945 

Roof, 1945-1948 
Petrea, 1949- 



NEW BETHEL, STANLY CO. 

New Bethel Lutheran Church is located in Stanly County, about 
five miles west from Richfield, and near the old Misenheimer Springs. 
The original location was about two miles west from the present 
church, where Bethel Reformed Church is now located. This church 
was for a long time called Bear Creek, because it was first located 
near a creek by that name. 

This was at first a union church, owning property jointly with 
the Reformed congregation. The 112 acre tract of land on which 
Bethel (Bear Creek) Lutheran-Reformed church was originally built was 
donated to the two congregations jointly by Christopher Lyerly, who 
was a Lutheran, and a son of the Christopher Lyerly who went, as 
one of the two commissioners, to Germany to secure a Lutheran 
preacher and a school teacher. 

The first church was a log building, and, according to the old 
Church Record, was erected on the 19th and 20th of March 1806. This 
was in keeping with ye olden times "house raising" customs in putting 
up log buildings. Considerable time elapsed after the building was 
under roof before it was completed. Meanwhile an appeal was made 



258 



History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 



for assistance in the undertaking, and the Missionary Society in 
Charleston, S. C, responded with a timely gift of three cases of glass 
for windows. 

About 1872 it was decided that the Lutheran and the Reformed 
congregations should each have its own house of worship. In the re- 
adjustment the Reformed congregation retained the old church, and the 
Lutherans purchased land about two miles east from the old church and 
built a new house of worship, which they appropriately called New 
Bethel. However, not all of the Lutherans were willing to leave the 
old church and grounds, but maintained a small Lutheran organization 
and continued to worship at the old church. This, of course, called 
for still further adjustments of property ownership, which was settled 
by a specially appointed committee from Synod, upon request from the 
local groups, on an equitable basis. The group which remained at the 
old place eventually disbanded. 

New Bethel Lutheran Church is now building a new brick church 
on their present grounds, under the leadership of their pastor. Rev. 
John L. Morgan. At one time they owned a share in the parsonage at 
Misenheimer Springs, but at present they cooperate in maintaining a 
parsonage at Richfield. 



List of Pastors: 



C. A. G. Storch, 1806-1814 
J. W. Meyer, 1814-1817 
C. A. G. Storch, 1819-1823 
Daniel Scherer, 1824-1831 
Daniel Jenkins, 1834-1836 
Benjamin Arey, 1837-1838 
P. A. Strobel, 1838-1841 
W. G. Harter, 1841-1856 
J. D. Scheck, 1856-1857 
G. D. Bernheim, 1858-1860 
J. B. Anthony, 1860-1866 
L. C. Groseclose, 1867-1871 
W. R. Ketchie, 1873 
P. A. Strobel, 1874-1875 
J. B. Anthony, Sup., 1877 
S. Rothrock, 1878-1879 
Whitson Kimball, 1880-1883 
A. D. L. Moser, 1885-1887 
G. H. Cox, 1888-1890 
C. C. Lyerly, 1890-1892 



J. H. C. Fisher, 1893-1894 
C. C. Lyerly, 1894-1897 
J. A. Linn, 1898-1902 
F. B. Kuntz, Sup., 1903 
C. R. Pless, 1904-1907 
W. A. Dutton, 1907-1912 
J. B. Moose, 1913-1914 
J. A. Linn, 1914-1915 
C. M. Fox, 1916-1919 
H. A. Trexler, 1920-1923 

B. D. Castor, Sup., 1924 

C. P. Fisher, Sup., 1925 

B. M. Clark, Sup., 1926 
E. R. Trexler, 1926-1931 

C. L. Shipton, Sup., 1932-1933 
C. L. Shipton, 1934-1938 

P. E. Moose, 1938-1943 
J. L. Lackey, 1944-1947 
John L. Morgan, 1947- 



NEW JERUSALEM. DAVIDSON CO. 



New Jerusalem Church is located in Davidson County, about ten 
miles east from Lexington, near the Lexington-Asheboro Highway. 

On August 28, 1856, Levi Beck, a Lutheran, deeded a tract of land. 



History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 



259 



in that vicinity, to Daniel Foust, A. J. Ward, David Beck, and David 
Swing, Trustees, to be used by the Lutheran, Reformed, Methodist, and 
Baptist churches as a location for a church. A building was soon erected, 
thereon, by the Lutherans and Reformed, so New Jerusalem Church 
dates her organization from that year, 1856. This conclusion is further 
substantiated by the following quotation from the old church book, 
which says: "New Jerusalem Church, November, A.D., 1856, a sub- 
scription list for the support of the Rev. J. M. Wagner and T. Grouse 
for their services at this church." The records show that Rev. Mr. 
Wagner served the congregation from its beginning in 1856 to 1860. 

The old building was replaced, in 1910, by the present frame 
church, by Lutherans, Reformed, and Methodist Protestants. This build- 
ing is still used by Lutherans and Reformed on alternate Sundays. 
This church belonged to the Tennessee Synod and was. for most of the 
time, a part of the Holly Grove Parish. 



List of Pastors: 



J. M. Wagner, 1856-1860 

J. E. Seneker, 1860-1862 

I. Conder, 1863-1866 

L. A. Fox, 1867 

Thomas Crouse, 1868-1875 

C. H. Bernheim, 1877-1882 

W. P. Cline, 1883-1891 

Jacob Wike, 1892-1894 

A. R. Beck, 1895-1896 

J. A. Arndt, 1897 and in 1901 



J. L. Deaton, Sup., 1897 
C. L. Miller, 1898-1903 
A. L. Boliek, 1906-1909 
J. F. Deal, 1910-1911 
J. M. Senter, 1911-1918 
R. B. Sigmon, 1919-1928 
R. L. Fisher, 1928-1942 
C. F. Kyles, 1942-1947 
C. L. Miller, Sup., 1948 
L. O. Roof, 1948- 



NEW JERUSALEM, HICKORY 

New Jerusalem Church is located in Catawba County, on the 
Startown Road, about four miles from Hickory. 

This church was organized on October 29, 1905, by Rev. C. L. 
Miller, with twenty-nine members. Previous to this time a congre- 
gation had been started in the Killian School House, about 1880, by 
Rev. D. J. Settlemyre, but the organization was discontinued. In 1893 
Rev. W. P. Cline effected a re-organization, but for the lack of a 
church building, it soon discontinued. 

The present organization set itself to work, under the leadership 
of Dr. C. L. Miller, and in a short time built a nice frame house of 
worship, in 1906, on a lot donated by S. E. Killian and Mrs. Frances 
Deal. Members and friends generously donated much of the material 
used in the building. 

In 1936, while Rev. C. E. Lutz was pastor, a new brick church 
was built, costing close to $20,000.00. It was equipped for both 
church and Sunday School needs, but was completely destroyed by 
fire January 19, 1948. Under the inspiring leadership of their pastor, 



260 History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 

Rev. B. J. Wessinger, the congregation proceeded at once to rebuild. 
Fortunately they had $20,000.00 insurance on the building. The new 
building represents an outlay of about $70,000.00. It is a splendid 
church, well equipped for both church services and organizational pro- 
grams. The cornerstone was laid and the building dedicated on June 
5, 1949. This congregation has a new brick parsonage, which cost 
$13,000.00, and is supporting a fulltime pastor. 

List of Pastors: 

C. L. Miller, 1905-1906 W. G. Cobb, 1926-1927 

J. D. Mauney, 1906-1908 G. H. L. Lingle, 1927-1931 

B. L. Stroup, 1909-1915 C. E. Lutz, 1931-1940 

V. L. Fulmer, 1915-1917 G. A. Phillips, 1940-1943 

W. D. Haltiwanger, 1917-1925 B. J. Wessinger, 1944- 



OLD MT. PLEASANT, WATAUGA CO. 

Old Mt. Pleasant is located in Watauga County, eight miles north- 
east of Boone. The background of this church is the same as that of 
Mt. Pleasant, up to the year 1922, because the two congregations were 
all one prior to that time. 

The original organization was effected in 1845 by Rev. Jonathan 
Moser in the Jackson School House and was at first called the 
Jackson Church. In the late fifties, the name was changed to Mt. 
Pleasant, and a lot for a church was donated by Jordan Councill. 
However, the Civil War delayed building until 1868, when a frame 
church was erected. It was remodeled while Rev. J. L. Deaton was 
pastor. 

A second building was constructed in 1910 and was dedicated 
by the pastor. Rev. H. A. Kistler on July 31, 1910. This second building 
was destroyed by fire January 4, 1920. After this destruction occurred, 
some of the members, with the pastor. Rev. N. D. Yount, moved to a 
new location two miles east of the original grounds and built a 
new church and retained the old name, Mt. Pleasant. But those 
members who did not move to the new location, reorganized them- 
selves into a congregation under the name. Old Mt. Pleasant, and 
built a new house of worship at the old place. Both buildings were 
erected in 1923. 

Old Mt. Pleasant shares in the ownership and upkeep of the 
parsonage, and hence helped to replace the one that was recently 
destroyed by fire. 

List of Pastors: 

J. R. Moser, 1845 J. C. Wessinger, 1892 

Timothy Moser, 1847 J. C. Ditez, 1893 

Henry Goodman, 1849-1852 J. L. Deaton, 1895-1897 

Christian Moretz, 1852-1868 P. C. and Jacob Wike, 1898 

A. J. Fox, 1859 J. L. Deaton, 1900 



History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 



261 



Henry Goodman, 1870-1872 

J. R. Peterson, 1872 

J. M. Smith, 1872 

G. L. Hunt, 1874-1876 

P. C. Henkel, 1880 

R. A. Yoder, 1881 

D. A. Goodman, 1881-1882 

M. L. Little, 1882 

P. C. Henkel, 1883 

P. C. Wike, 1883-1884 

J. A. Rudisill, 1884 

W. P. and R. H. Cline ,1885 

D. A. Goodman, 1887 

R. A. Yoder and 

J. P. Miller, 1888 
J. C. Moser, 1889 
Jacob Wike, 1890-1891 
J. A. Rudisill and 



E. J. Sox, 1901 
John Hall, 1901-1905 

H. A. Kistler, 1905-1910 
J. A. Yount, 1911-1912 
A. L. Boliek, 1912 
M. L. Carpenter, 1913-1918 
N. D. Yount, 1918-1921 
W. A. Deaton, 1923-1932 
W. A. Deaton, Sup., 1933-1934 
H. A. Kistler, 1934-1937 
J. A. Yount, 1938-1939 
John Hall, Sup., 1940-1941 
H. H. Ritchie, Sup., 1942 
H. B. Lenoard, 1943-1944 
H. H. Ritchie, 1944-1946 

F. M. Speagle, 1947-1951 
H. C. Linn, 1951- 



ORGAN CHURCH, ROWAN COUNTY 

Organ Church is located in Rowan County, ten miles south of 
Salisbury and a few miles west of Rockwell, on the road leading to 
Mt. Pleasant. 

This church v/as originally named Zion, but it later came to be 
known as Organ Church because it owned a pipe organ, which was 
the only church in the surrounding country that had such an instru- 
ment of music at that time. The organ was built by hand by Mr. 
(John) Stirewalt, a member of the congregation. We do not know 
when the organ was built, but we do know that it was used in the 
church which was built in 1774, and that it was later transferred to 
the present stone church which was built in 1792-1795. 

It has been claimed from times of old, by both Lutheran and 
Reformed writers, that Organ Lutheran Church and Lower Stone Re- 
formed Church were started as a union church, meaning thereby that 
both congregations owned and worshiped in the same building. How- 
ever, this claim has in recent years been thought by some to be un- 
founded. (See Historical Sketches of the Reformed Church in North 
Carolina, page 193.) 

Just when Organ Church was first started, no one now living 
seems to know. The date given by the congregation itself is 1745. This 
is the same date given by Lower Stone Church for its organization also. 
German families, of both Lutheran and Reformed faith, settled in 
this territory at a very early date. They were a church loving people, 
and it would have been in keeping with their religious training to 
provide a church home for themselves and their children as soon as 
practicable. So, without waiting for a minister to come and lead the 



262 



History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 



way, consecrated laymen went ahead and organized congregations and 
built houses of worship, and secured pastors later. 

The original location of Organ Church, like that of the date of 
its organization, is not certainly known. In recent years some think 
it was located, as a union church, near the present Lower Stone Church, 
but this claim is undetermined. Dr. Bernheim, in his, "German 
Settlements and the Lutheran Church in the Carolinas", page 244, as 
well as early writers of the Reformed Church, say it was first located 
where St. Peter's Lutheran Church now stands, which is about three 
miles east of Rockwell. These writers claim that the original church, 
was built of hickory logs, and that for that reason it was called "the 
Hickory Church", and that it was used by both denominations. This 
location, however, was said to have been only temporary, and that 
permanent locations were established later. 

Organ Church records show that on August 16, 1786, Lutwig Seferd 
sold a ten acre tract of land to the Elders and Trustees of the Lutheran 




Organ Lutheran Church 
Rowan County, Salisbury, North Carolina 



congregation belonging to the Second Creek Organ Meeting House, for 
five pounds, described as follows: "On the waters of Second Creek, 
beginning at a white oak, George Henry Berger's corner, thence south 
40 poles to a white oak in said Berger's line, thence east 40 poles to 
a stone, thence north 40 poles to a black oak, thence west 40 poles to 
the beginning, containing 10 ocres of land, including the said meeting 
house, school house, and other buildings." 

This ten acre tract of land lies south of the present stone church, 
and includes what are now the parsonage lands. It will be noted 
that when this tract was purchased, there were already a "meeting 
house, school house, and other buildings" on it. When this meeting 
house, school house and other buildings were erected, it is not stated. 



History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 263 

It would seem reasonable to suppose, however, that they were con- 
structed soon after settlement was first made in this community; 
possibly soon after their sojourn at the old hickory log place. Regard- 
less of when the buildings were erected, they were built on govern- 
ments lands, or on privately owned lands, for which the church had 
not yet secured title. This meeting house was Organ Church's first place 
of worship on those grounds. 

When it is noted that a new church building was under con- 
struction in 1774, one naturally wonders if the old meeting house, which 
no doubt was built of logs, may not have decayed from age by that 
time. As to a new building in 1774, Rev. C. A. G. Storch, who was pastor 
of Organ Church, 1788-1823, wrote in the old Church Record Book, in 1789, 
the following statement: "In the year 1774, after the birth of Christ, the 
following members of our congregation began to build the so-called 
Organ Church." A list of the names then follows. 

The building erected in 1774 was either of logs, or else a frame 
structure, probably the latter. It stood on a different tract of land from 
the one where the old log meeting house stood. The old members of the 
congregation understood that it was located right where the present 
stone church now stands. It seems to have been common knowledge 
locally that this frame building was rolled away, a little to the north, 
to make room for the new stone building. The old building was then 
used for a while as a school house, and later as a meeting place for the 
church council. 

It is interesting to follow the line of procedure by which the 
ten acre tract of land, on which the church of 1774, and also the stone 
church were erected, was acquired. In 1776, Lewis Seiferd, Peter Edle- 
man, and John Stirewalt purchased 218 acres of land just north of and 
including the present Organ Church grounds, which they sold to Rev. 
J. G. Arends, their pastor, in 1779. After Pastor Arends moved to 
Lincoln County, in 1785, he sold the land to John Stirewalt in 1786, who 
held it until 1789, when he and his wife, Margaret, sold about ten 
acres of the same 218 acre tract to the Elders and Trustees and their 
successors in office for the Lutheran congregation belonging to the 
Second Creek Meeting House. 

Different opinions have been advanced as to the time when 
the present stone church was built, some thinking the congregation 
was twenty years in building it. This assumption resulted from 
believing that the building erected in 1774 was the stone church, and 
that the date 1794 in the gable of the building indicated when it was 
completed. But, fortunately, Pastor Storch clears the matter for us in 
a letter which he wrote to Dr. Velthusen, December 19, 1791, in which 
he says: "The congregation of the Organ Church will erect a new build- 
ing next summer, and, to be specific, it will be a stone church." (See 
N. C. Historical Review, April 1930, page 262.) 

Then as to its completion, we read from another letter by Pastor 
Storch, dated February 25, 1796, the following:: "The stone church of 
my congregation on Second Creek was completed last autumn and 



264 History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 

will be consecrated on Easter of this year. It is fifty feet long, forty 
feet wide, and about twenty feet high. It cost 1100 to 1200 Spanish 
Taler." (See Review for October 1943, page 339.) Thus it will be seen that 
this stone church was begun in 1792, completed in 1795, and consecrated 
on Easter Sunday 1796. The date in the front gable shows when the 
stone masonry was completed. 

History is replete with the story of Christopher Rendleman 
of Organ Church and Christopher Lyerly of St. John's Church going 
as Commissioners to Germany, 1772-1773, and securing the services 
of Rev. Adolph Nussmann as minister and Mr. J. Gottfried Arends as 
school teacher. Rev. M. Storch, as pastor of Organ Church has left an 
entry of this event written in the old Organ Church Record Book, under 
date of January 31, 1789, as follows: "Christopher Rendleman and 
Christopher Lyerly were sent as the deputies of the congregation to 
London, thence to Hanover, and they received a minister and a school 
teacher, namely the preacher, Adolph Nussmann, and Gottfried Arends 
as school teacher." 

Some indications are that when Rev. Mr. Nussmann first arrived 
in North Carolina, he resided for a short while in Salisbury. But if so, 
he later located in the vicinity of Organ Church, where he lived until 
1774 or possibly early in 1775, when he moved into his own home near St. 
John's Church in Cabarrus County, where he remained until called by 
death in 1794. Rev. Mr. Arends lived on his own farm near Organ Church, 
now known as the Ketner place, until he moved to Lincoln County. Rev. 
C. A. G. Storch first lived near Salisbury, on his own place, near 
Crane Creek. Dr. Rumple's History of Rowan County says it was 
the "Chilson place", on the Bringle Ferry road. He was living there 
as late as February 5, 1805, at which time the records show that he 
sold part of the plantation "where he was then living". On October 21, 
1805, Pastor Storch bought a tract of land on the old Concord road, about 
one mile north from where Ebenezer Lutheran Church now stands, 
and lived there the remainder of his life. The old house has been re- 
modeled and is in use today. A spreading oak marks the place. 

The old four story brick dwelling, believed to have been built 
by the Mr. Stirewalt who built the pipe organ, stands about four 
miles west of Organ Church. The date "1766" is imprinted on a 
brick in the wall of the building, which is supposed to mark the 
year in which it was built. And "October 11, 1811" is lettered on a 
marble slab on the front of the house, which some think was placed 
there by his son, John, after the property came into his possession 
by will. 

Sometime after the organization of the Tennessee Synod, a division 
arose among the members of Organ Church, in which some favored 
one Synod and some the other. The larger group was in sympathy 
with the North Carolina Synod, and remained loyal to their mother 
congregation. But about 1830 the other group withdrew and formed 
a new congregation, in connection with the Tennessee Synod, which 
they called Krauth Memorial. However, it was later named St. Peter's. 



History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 



265 



This church was located on the same grounds where Organ Church is 
supposed to have started. 

Another group went out from Organ Church, possibly a few years 
later, and organized Phanuel's Lutheran Church, also in connection with 
the Tennessee Synod. But this congregation was discontinued more than 
fifty years ago. 

While Rev. W. R. Brown was pastor of Organ Church, 1886-1894, 
the old flagstone floor of the church was replaced by a wooden floor, 
and the high pulpit was taken down and a smaller one installed. At 
the same time the old pipe organ was removed from the church and 
allowed to be destroyed. Then, about 1906, while Rev. C. A. Brown 
was the pastor, the roof of the church was made steeper, and a stone 
tower was built. When erected, the tower faced the road, but later 
the road was relocated to the opposite side of the church, so that now 
the tower is in the back of the building. 

A stone building for Sunday School purposes was put up in 1928, 
while Rev. Paul L. Miller was pastor there. It is a two story building 
with basement, all fitted out with class rooms and assembly halls. 

The old parsonage, built while Rev. W. R. Brown was their 
pastor, was replaced in 1939, under the efficient leadership of Rev. 
O. W. Aderholdt. It is a two story stone building, modernly equipped, 
and harmonizes with the stone church. 

Some years ago a pipe organ was installed in the church, and the 
entire interior was refinished and redecorated, under the direction of 
Dr. Aderholdt. At present the congregation is putting up a concrete 
block building for recreational and organizational purposes at a cost 
of about $5,000.00. 

It would seem worthy of note here, that a Post Office by the 
name of Organ Church was established near that church, at what 
is known as the Ketner, (formerly Arends), place in 1861, which was 
continued, with but a short interval, until 1896, when it was merged 
with the Rockwell office. 

List of Pastors: 



Adolph Nussmann, 1773-1774 
J. G. Arends, 1775-1785 
Adolph Nussmann, 1785-1787 
C. A. G. Storch, 1788-1823 
Daniel Scherer, 1823-1829 
Jacob Kempfer, 1829-1832 
Henry Graeber, 1832-1843 
Samuel Rothrock, 1844-1866 
W. H. Cone, 1866 
William Artz, 1866-1867 
Samuel Rothrock, 1867-1869 
Simeon Scherer, 1869-1870 
W. H. Cone, 1870-1873 



W. R. Ketchie, 1873-1874 
P. A. Strobel, 1874-1875 
Samuel Rothrock, 1876-1886 
W. R. Brown, 1886-1894 
G. H. Cox, 1894-1904 
C. A. Brown, 1904-1907 
H. A. Trexler, 1908-1913 
R. R. Sowers, 1914-1918 
L. L. Lohr, 1918-1919 
M. L. Ridenhour, 1919-1922 
P. L. Miller, 1922-1936 
O. W. Aderholdt, 1936- 



266 History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 



PEACE. GIBSONVILLE 

Peace Church is located in Guilford County, seven miles west 
from Gibsonville, on the road leading by Friedens Church. 

This congregation was organized in 1898, by Rev. V. Y. Boozer, 
who was then pastor at Burlington. The first preaching service was 
conducted in April of that year. 

The charter members of this congregation came from old Frieden's 
Church, hence the name Peace, which is the English for Frieden. 

The church is a frame structure, 35 x 50 feet, which was built the 
same year in which the church was organized. It was remodeled and 
refinished while Rev. John L. Morgan was their pastor. 

This church was for many years in a parish with Frieden's and 
Sharon, but in January 1950, Peace and Sharon alone called Rev. W. J. 
Roof for those two congregations. 

List of Pastors: 

V. Y. Boozer, 1898-1899 Enoch Kite, 1931-1939 

W. W. J. Ritchie, 1899-1903 John L. Morgan, 1939-1943 

C. Brown Cox, 1903-1912 M. R. Farris, 1943-1949 

C. I. Morgan, 1912-1913 W. J. Roof, 1950-1952 

T. S. Brown, 1913-1921 Earl K. Bodie, 1952- 
G. W. McClanahan, 1921-1931 



PHILADELPHIA. GASTON CO. 

Philadelphia Church is located in Gaston County, near the South 
Fork of the Catawba River, about three miles north of Dallas. This 
church was organized in 1767. At first it was called Kastner's Church, 
after the name of Adam Kastner, one of its chief promoters, who located 
here in 1750, and remained here until his death in 1767. He was the 
first to be buried in the church cemetery. In 1776 the name of the 
church was changed to Philadelphia. 

The first building was of hewn logs, which was built about 
the time the church was organized. This building stood until 1867, 
just one hundred years, when a new frame building was erected. It 
was dedicated on May 20, 1867, the sermon for the occasion was by 
Rev. Timothy Moser. This building was ruined by the flood in July 
1916 on South Fork River, and all their records were lost. In 1917 a 
new frame church was erected on land farther away from the river, 
which is in use today. This church has sent a number of fine men 
into the church and business life, and has furnished scores of members 
for other churches, among whom are: Andrew Costner, a promoter of 
Gaston Female College at Dallas; J. M. Rhodes, a textile manufacturer; 
Rev. John Rhodes, who died of fever in 1841. 

This church was included in Rev. J. G. Arends' parish of eight 
or nine congregations west of the Catawba River, from 1785 to his death 



History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 



267 



in 1807. Pastor Arends lost his eyesight the latter years of his life, so 
he asked Rev. Paul Henkel to come and assist him in his work in 
1803, which he did for a few weeks. We do not have a complete list 
of pastors for this church, but note those known to have served here. 



List of Pastors: 



J. G. Arends, 1785-1807 
Philip Henkel, 1808-1814 
Daniel Moser, 1814-1821 
David Henkel, 1821-1830 
Adam Miller, Jr., 1831 
George Easterly, 1832 
Adam Miller, Jr., 1833-1844 
J. R. Peterson, 1845-1897 
H. J. Matthias, Sup., 1897-1898 
W. A. Deaton, 1899-1907 
P. D. Risinger, 1907-1911 



A. R. Beck, 1912-1917 
C. E. Fritz, 1917-1919 
C. N. Yount, 1919-1922 

J. L. Thornburg, Sup., 1922 

E. C. Cooper, Sup., 1922 
C. K. Rhodes, 1922-1928 

B. E. Petrea, 1928-1932 

F. M. Speagle, 1932-1947 

C. K. Rhodes, Sup., 1947 
W. H. Dutton, 1947- 



PHILADELPHIA. GRANITE FALLS 

Philadelphia Church is located in the town of Granite Falls, in 
Caldwell County. 

It is believed that this work was begun by Rev. Henry Goodman, 
who organized the congregation in a school house about three miles 
south from the present location, in the year 1876. 

The first church was built in 1877, under the pastoral direction 
of Rev. M. L. Little and Rev. P. C. Henkel. The lot was given by Dr. 
G. H. Jones in 1877 and is the same one now occupied by the present 
church. The present church was built in 1911, while Rev. J. P. Price 
was pastor. It was greatly enlarged in 1933, by adding an Educa- 
tional Building while Rev. R. M. Carpenter was pastor. 

Philadelphia was for a long time in a parish with St. John's at 
Hudson, and St. Matthew's, but in 1949, became self-supporting. 



List of Pastors: 



Henry Goodman, 1876 
M. L. Little, 1877 
P. C. Henkel, 1878 
D. A. Goodman, 1882-1884 
D. J. Settlemyre, 1886-1887 
C. H. Bernheim, 1890-1893 
J. C. Moser, 1893-1895 
W. P. Cline, 1897-1900 
J. A. Yount, 1900-1901 
J. L. Cromer, 1902-1904 



J. P. Price, 1906-1913 
J. A. Yount, 1915-1918 
F. L. Conrad, 1919-1921 
J. J. Bickely, 1922-1925 
Paul Sigmon, 1925-1928 
C. O. Lippard, 1928-1930 
R. M. Carpenter, 1932-1941 
R. B. Sigmon, 1943-1949 
James K. Cobb, 1949-1952 
P. L. Morgan, 1952- 



268 History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 



PILGRIM LUTHERAN CHURCH, DAVIDSON CO. 

Pilgrim Lutheran Church is located in Davidson County, about 
three miles north from Lexington, and a mile west from the Lexington- 
Thomasville Highway. The original location of the church was about 
one mile south, where the Lutherans and Reformed members owned a 
church together. 

It is not known definitely when this work was first begun. The 
deed for the original church land is dated 1783, and was made to Philip 
Sowers, Peter Karn, and Martin Shiddles, Elders in trust for the Dutch 
congregation. History tells us that large numbers of German families 
settled in that section of the state as early as 1740, and on up to the out- 
break of the Revolutionary War. These German settlers were either 
Lutherans or German Reformed. They had a great love for their church, 
and made provision, as soon as possible, for church services, where they 
and their families could meet together for worship. 

The old Baptismal Record Book is still extant, in which baptisms 
are recorded as far back as 1757, which would lead one to believe that 
the church was organized at least at that time, and it may have been 
a few years earlier. Be that as it may, the date of organization claimed 
by Pilgrim Lutheran Church itself is 1754, which date is likewise claimed 
by Pilgrim Reformed Church. 

The first house of worship was a log building, with a balcony, 
and a high pulpit. The second building was a frame structure, erected 
in 1807, and was arranged similarly to the log church. Then, in 1882, a 
third building was erected, which was also a frame structure, but larger 
and more modern than the previous one had been. 

This third building, like the previous ones, was owned and used 
by both Lutherans and German Reformed, without question, until about 
the close of the last century, when the question was raised as to the 
legal right of the Lutheran congregation to ownership in the church 
property. The case was taken to court, which ruled in favor of the 
Lutherans. 

After that question was settled, it was mutually agreed to sell 
the property — all except the burying grounds — and divide the pro- 
ceeds between the Lutherans and the German Reformed on a fifty- 
fifty basis. The property was put up for sale at public auction, and was 
bought by the German Reformed congregation, and it is still being 
used by that body. 

The Lutherans then secured a new location about a mile north 
from the old church and proceeded to erect a new frame house of 
worship for themselves. This building was completed on October the 
2nd, 1903, and was the fourth church for the Lutheran congregation. 
But that very night after its completion, it was entirely destroyed by 
fire. This experience served to draw our Lutheran families closer 
together. For many years prior to this, two Lutheran groups — 
one of the North Carolina Synod and the other of the Tennessee Synod 
— had been worshiping in the old church; but on October the 19th, 



History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 



269 



1903, just ten days after the fire, the two groups got together and united 
in one Lutheran congregation in the North Carolina Synod. It should 
be noted here that through these trying experiences our Lutheran 
brethren had the good fortune of having wise and devoted pastors to 
lead them — Dr. C. L. Miller and Rev. P. J. Wade. 

So this united Pilgrim band now set themselves to the task of 
building another house of worship. On May 17, 1904, the building was 
dedicated, free of all indebtedness. This was their fifth house of 
worship. 

Then, in 1943, this, their fifth house of worship, was likewise 
destroyed by fire. But, again the congregation set itself to work, 
under the leadership of Pastor John A. Pless, building a new brick 
church 38 x 86 feet in dimensions with transepts 12 x 24 feet, with full 
basement, all modernly equipped. In 1934, Pilgrim and St. Luke's 
Churches united in building a parsonage at Tyro. However, these 
churches have now arranged for each congregation to have a fulltime 
pastor, and Pilgrim has completed a new seven room brick parsonage. 
This is the home church of Rev. F. L. Conrad, D.D. 

We do not have a complete list of pastors for this church, but 
give here the names of all whom we know, for both the North 
Carolina Synod and also the Tennessee Synod. 

Rev. Nussm.ann and Rev. Arends made repeated visits and preached 
for this congregation. 



List of Pastors: 



North Carolina Synod: 



C. E. Bernhardt, 1787-1788 
Arnold Roschen, 1788-1800 
Paul Henkel, 1800-1805 
Ludwig Markert, 1805-1816 

G. Schober, Occasional Supply 
J. W. Meyer, 1816-1817 
Daniel Walcher, 1817-1821 
Jacob Miller, 1824-1827 

D. P. Rosenmiller, 1830-1831 
John Tabler, 1831-1833 
Daniel Jenkins, 1833-1834 
Benjamin Arey, 1837 

Jacob Crim, 1839-1842 
J. B. Anthony, 1847-1848 
L. C. Groseclose, 1849-1854 
W. A. Julian, 1854-1863 
W. H. Cone, 1864-1865 
A. D. L. Moser, 1867 
J. D. Bowles, 1871-1874 



C. H. Bernheim, 1874-1878 
P. E. Zink, 1878-1883 

R. W. Petrea, 1883-1885 
J. M. Hedrick, 1885-1886 

D. W. Michael, 1887-1891 
Whitson Kimball, 1892-1894 
T. H. Strohecker, 1896 

P. J. Wade, 1898-1905 
G. H. L. Lingle, 1906-1910 
J. L. Smith, 1911-1912 
N. D. Bodie, 1912-1913 
W. C. Buck, 1914-1918 
M. L. Kester, 1918-1919 
C. H. Day, 1920-1921 
C. R. Pless, 1922-1930 
W. H. Hiller, 1931-1933 
C. R. Pless, 1934-1940 
J. A. Pless, 1940-1951 
Q. O. Lyerly, 1952- 



270 



History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 



Tennessee Synod: 

Rev. Paul Henkel and other pastors as visiting ministers during 

1822-1832. 

Henry Goodman, 1832-1848 C. H. Bernheim, 1877-1882 

Adam Efird, 1849-1854 W. P. Cline, 1883-1891 

J. M. Wagner, 1854-1860 Jacob Wike, 1891-1893 

J. E. Seneker, 1860-1861 A. R. Beck, 1893-1895 

I. Conder, 1861-1866 C. L. Miller, 1897-1903 
Thomas Grouse, 1866-1875 



PROSPERITY CHURCH, CABARRUS COUNTY 

Prosperity Lutheran Church is located in Cabarrus County, about 
eight miles northeast of Concord. This church was organized on Sep- 
tember 27, 1879, in the Rimer School house, with sixteen members, by 
Rev. R. W. Petrea, then pastor of St. John's Church. 

Their first house of worship was a frame building, about 30x40 
feet in dimensions, which was erected in 1881. Most of the material for 
the building was given, and the work was done by the members of 
the congregation. The building was soon completed, and was dedicated 
April 29, 1883, by Pastor Petrea and Rev. W. A. Lutz. 

In 1916 the building was moved about one hundred yards south 
from the original location, and in 1923 a tower and one transept were 
added. 

While Rev. C. P. Fisher, Jr., was pastor there, about $35,000.00 in 
money, and much of the material, were gathered for a new church. 
Then, after Rev. H. F. Lineberger became pastor, a new lot was pur- 
chased, a short distance north of the old building, and in 1951 a beautiful 
brick church was constructed, at a cost of approximately $100,000.00. 
There is a two story educational annex to the back side of the main 
church. 

The cornerstone of the new church was laid December 16, 1951, 
by President F. L. Conrad, Pastor H. F. Lineberger, and Dr. J. L. Morgan. 
The complete church was formally opened for divine services that same 
day, and a service of blessing was carried out by Dr. J. L. Morgan for 
the church furnishings. The sermon for the occasion was preached by 
Dr. F. L. Conrad, President of Synod. Pastor Lineberger was in charge 
of services. 

List of Pastors: 



R. W. Petrea, 1879-1887 
S. L. Keller, 1887-1888 
J. M. Hedrick, 1888-1893 
B. S. Brown, 1894-1896 
S. D. Steffey, 1896 
R. L. Brown, 1897-1899 
J. H. C. Fisher, 1900-1919 
J. B. Moose, 1919-1923 



C. P. Fisher, Sr., 1924 
C. A. Brown, 1925-1932 
P. L. Miller, 1932 
C. F. Kyles, 1932-1943 
C. P. Fisher, Jr., 1943-1949 
H. F. Lineberger, 1949-1952 
J. L. Peeler, 1952- 



History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 



271 



PROVIDENCE, ROWAN CO. 

Providence Church is located in Rowan County, about seven miles 
north of the town of Cleveland. 

The congregation was organized in 1871, by Rev. J. H. Fesperman. 
The most of the original membership had formerly been members of 
St. Matthew's Church in Davie County. 

Their first church was a log building, constructed soon after the 
organization, and was used for many years but never completed. Later 
a new frame building, 30 x 45 feet, was built and is still in use. It was 
dedicated April 25, 1897 by Rev. B. S. Brown and Rev. H. W. Jeffcoat. 
This congregation has all the while been in a parish with other 
congregations. 

List of Pastors: 



J. H. Fesperman, 1871-1876 
W. R. Ketchie, 1878-1888 
R. L. Brown, 1889-1891 
W. R. Ketchie, Sup., 1892 
E. P. Parker, 1893 
H. E. H. Sloop, 1894-1895 
Whitson Kimball, 1896 
W. R. Ketchie, Sup., 1897 
B. S. Brown, Sr., 1898-1899 
R. A. Helms, 1899-1900 
Vacant, 1901-1903 



L. P. Boland, 1904-1908 
T. C. Parker, 1908-1913 
V. R. Stickley, 1915-1920 
E. F. Troutman, 1926-1929 
C. F. Kyles, 1929-1932 
R. H. Kepley, 1932-1935 
O. G. Swicegood, 1936-1937 
H. A. Kistler, 1937-1938 
C. A. Misenheimer, 1938-1939 
J. D. Stoner, 1939-1944 
L. R. Sloop, 1949-1950 



REDEEMER. KANNAPOLIS 

Redeemer Lutheran Church is located on Central Drive in Jackson 
Park, Kannapolis. 

This field was surveyed and approved by the Board of American 
Missions in 1937. On June 10, 1937, Rev. W. Leo Smith was called to 
serve this mission and the one in Blackwelder Park. The lot was pur- 
chased by Synod for the mission. 

With arrangements for a loan of $5,000.00 from the Brotherhood, 
a building was started in August 1938 and was completed and opened 
for services November 20, 1938. This is a brick church, with basement 
for Sunday School. The Sunday School was organized on the opening 
Sunday with 33 in attendance. The church cost approximately $10,000.00, 
and was formally organized November 27, 1938, with 63 members. Dr. J. L. 
Morgan preached the sermon and assisted Pastor Smith in the organiza- 
tion. 

Pastor Smith resigned January 20, 1943, and Rev. David F. Cooper 
took charge March 1, 1943. 

A house and lot were purchased for a parsonage in 1944 for 



272 History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 

$5,200.00. A loan from the Board of American Missions was received 
for this purchase. 

With help from the Missionary Society and Luther League, to- 
gether with gifts from various friends, the entire indebtedness on the 
church building was paid off in 1945. The church was dedicated, free 
of debt, November 18, 1945, by the President of Synod, assisted by 
Pastor Cooper, Rev. W. L. Smith, and Rev. E. K. Bodie. 

Pastor Cooper resigned July 1, 1947, to accept a call to Holy Trinity 
Church, in Mt. Pleasant, and Rev. Stafford L. Swing was called to fill 
the vacancy, effective September 15, 1947. Up to this time Redeemer had 
been in a parish with Blackwelder Park — now known as St. David's 
Church — but the call for the new pastor was for fulltime service. 

A parish building was constructed in 1951, at a cost of $12,000.00. 

List of Pastors: 

W. L. Smith, 1937-1943 S. L. Swing, 1947-1950 

D. F. Cooper, 1943-1947 J. L. Ballentine, 1951- 



REFORMATION CHURCH, TAYLORSVILLE 

Reformation Lutheran Church is located on West Main Street, in 
Taylorsville, Alexander County. Work leading up to this organization 
was begun by Rev. H. Belk Leonard in 1945, while he was in charge 
of a rural parish in that community. Services were held, by him, in a 
school building in the town. 

In 1946 a house and lot were purchased for a parsonage, and for 
a church location, for the sum of $10,000.00, on a fifty-fifty basis by the 
mission and the Synod. Rev. Leonard resigned in 1946, and Rev. James 
K. Cobb was called to become fulltime pastor. 

The congregation was formally organized on Sunday, December 1, 
1946, with fifty-six charter members, by Pastor Cobb, assisted by the 
President of Synod. The services were held in the Baptist Church, and 
the sermon for the occasion was by Dr. J. L. Morgan, president. 

About this time the Associate Reformed Presbyterian Church be- 
came vacant, and their house of worship was offered to the newly 
organized Lutheran group in which to hold services, until a church 
could be built. Rev. Cobb resigned October 12, 1949, and on January 1, 
1950, Rev. R. B. Sigmon became pastor here. 

Plans for a brick church, with an educational annex, were soon 
made and approved. Loans from the Brotherhood Loan and Gift Fund, 
and gifts from the Women's Synodical Missionary Society, and from 
other sources, enabled the congregation to go ahead with their build- 
ing. The contract was let July 7, 1950, for $48,809.00, however, that 
did not include the pews, chancel furniture, art glass windows, light- 



History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 273 

ing fixtures, Hammond organ, piano, and other items, all of which, 
with the main church, amounted to $59,400.00. 

Groundbreaking services were held July 23, 1950, by Pastor Sigmon, 
President F. L. Conrad, and Rev. James K. Cobb. 

The cornerstone was laid October 22, 1950, by Pastor R. B. Sigmon, 
President F. L. Conrad, and Dr. J. L. Morgan. 

The new church was opened for services May 20, 1951, by Pastor 
Sigmon. The address that morning was by Mr. H. E. Isenhour, Secre- 
tary of the Board of American Missions and also of the Mission Com- 
mittee of Synod. President F. L. Conrad brought the message that 
afternoon. 

List of Pastors: 

H. B. Leonard, 1945-1946 R. B. Sigmon, 1950- 

J, K. Cobb, 1946-1949 



RESURRECTION, KINGS MOUNTAIN 

Resurrection Lutheran Church is located in Crescent Hills, Kings 
Mountain, N. C. 

Work in this field was requested during 1950 by Lutherans living in 
that area. 

On February 1, 1951, the Rev. Vance M. Daniel was called by the 
Board of American Missions as Mission Developer. 

On March 18, 1951, the church was organized in a city school 
auditorium by Pastor Daniel with 83 charter members. 

A lot, approximately two acres, was donated by Fred W. Plonk and 
his brother, Hal, and deeded to the Synod, on which the Church edifice 
was erected at a cost of $42,000. The cornerstone was placed, and the 
church opened on December 2, 1951. The interior, with complete 
furnishings, was finished by March 15, 1953, at an additional cost of 
$23,000. 

List of Pastors: 

Vance M. Daniel, 1951- 



RICHLAND, LIBERTY 

Richland Lutheran Church is located on the border of Randolph 
and Guilford Counties, about four miles northeast of Liberty. 

The date of organization for this church is not definitely known. 
Rev. D. I. Offman, who has spent many years in this community, 
thinks the church was started about 1776, or soon thereafter, by both 



274 History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 

Lutheran and Reformed members in a locality about a mile north of 
Liberty. This church was called Barton's Meeting House. 

The Lutherans and Reformed separated after some years, and the 
Lutherans located where the present church now stands, after which 
it was called Richland Lutheran Church. In 1789 Richland joined 
with Low's, St. Paul's, and Frieden's congregations in calling as 
pastor Rev. C. E. Bernhardt, who came and served them most acceptably 
until 1800. 

The deed for the land for Richland Church was made by John and 
Margaret Reitzel in the year 1791. 

The first church at the present location was built of logs about 
the time the land was purchased. The building was about 25 x 35 feet 
in dimensions, with a gallery and a high pulpit, and is said to have 
had an elevated pew built expressly for the officers of the church. 

The next building was a frame structure 35 x 45 feet, which is 
still in regular use, but we do not know when it was built. 

For a number of years this congregation shared in the ownership 
of a parsonage at Low's Church, but when the parish connections were 
changed, different arrangements were made about a parsonage. 

At one time this congregation enjoyed a strong membership of 
outstanding families in the community whose influence was felt through- 
out the Synod. But, during more recent years, most of these families 
have moved to other places. Since the withdrawal of Grace con- 
gregation from the parish, in 1950, Richland has had only supply services. 

It should be noted here that Melanchthon Church was organized 
out of Richland members about 1824, following the organization of the 
Tennessee Synod in 1820. The Melanchthon organization continued to 
worship in the same old building, however, until 1850, when they 
built a church of their own at a different location. This explains 
why Rev. Philip Henkel, of the Tennessee Synod, was on a church 
visit to Richland in 1833 when he took sick and died in that community 
and is buried in the Richland cemetery. 

List of Pastors: 

C. E. Bernhardt, 1787-1800 R. R. Sowers, 1902-1905 
Philip Henkel, 1800-1805 C. M. Fox, 1906-1907 
Ludwig Markert, 1805-1810 V. R. Stickley, 1909-1913 
Jacob Scherer, 1810-1828 H. W. Jeffcoat, 1914-1915 

D. J. Hauer, 1828-1829 Jacob L. Morgan, Sup., 1915-1917 
William Artz, 1830-1852 H. W. Jeffcoat, 1917-1922 

J. Grieson, Asst., 1834-1839 B. A. Barringer, 1922-1927 

Andrew Sechrist, 1852-1854 P. G. Kinney, Sup., 1927 

John Swicegood, 1854-1855 Q. O. Lyerly, 1928-1936 

Simeon Scherer, 1855-1859 W. D. Yount, 1936-1937 

B. C. Hall, 1860-1864 C. H. Fisher, 1937-1939 

W. A. Julian, 1865-1870 E. A. Shenk, Sup., 1940-1941 

E. P. Parker, 1873-1881 J. C. Dickert, 1941-1946 

A. D. L. Moser, 1883-1884 J. R. Boggs, 1946-1948 

B. W. Cronk, 1887-1891 R. B. Sigmon, 1949-1950 
H. M. Brown, 1891-1902 



History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 275 



SALEM, LINCOLN CO. 

Salem Church is located in Lincoln County, about five miles 
north of Lincolnton and about four miles southwest from Maiden. It 
was formerly known as Old Church, and is so listed in the 1810 
Minutes of the North Carolina Synod. 

Dr. L. L. Lohr states in an article published in the North Caro- 
lina Lutheran for April 1936, that "an organization was effected in 
1796." We find grave stones dated as far back at 1792. 

The first church was of logs, but we do not know when it was 
built. In 1814, when the land on which the church stands was con- 
veyed to the two congregations of Lutheran and German Reformed, 
it was decided to repair the old church, and a subscription list was 
gotten out, headed "Repair Fund for the Old Church." This would 
seem to indicate that the church had been in use quite some years. 
In 1835 an addition was built to the pulpit end of the meeting 
house, 13 feet wide, with a shed roof, one story high, to have four 12 
light windows, one outside door; and that three logs behind the pulpit 
are to be cut out as far as the opening of the gallery. 

In 1848 it was decided to build a brick church, which was to be, 
like the old one, jointly owned by Lutheran and Reformed and was 
to be 35 X 45 feet in dimensions, which was to have two doors and 
four-light windows. This church was finished and dedicated in 1849. 
In 1914, it was agreed by Lutherans and Reformed to repair the 
church for which the Lutherans would pay three-fourths and the Re- 
formed one-fourth the cost; same to be held by three trustees — two 
Lutherans and one Reformed — H. F. McCoslin, F. E. Bost, (Lutheran) 
and C. E. Ramsour (Reformed). The repair program included a tower 
and bell, new interior finish, new furniture and chancel arrangements. 
Rev. F. M. Speagle was pastor at that time. 

In 1935, the two groups set out to build an Educational Annex 
Building, which was completed in 1937, and dedicated in 1938 by Pastor 
A. W. Lippard. 

We have not been able to find a complete list of pastors who 
served this church. We feel sure that Rev. J. G. Arends ministered 
to these people as best he could while living in Lincoln County from 
1785 to 1807. However, we have no record of this. We do find listed 
on the North Carolina Synod Minutes, for 1810, that Rev. Philip Henkel 
was pastor here, and that it was in the same parish which Rev. Arends 
formerly served. Other pastors of this congregation were probably the 
same as those in Rev. Arends parish, which was composed of Zion, 
Grace, Daniel's, etc. The list of pastors of which we have record is 
as follows: 

A. J. Fox, 1860-1884 W. D. Wise, 1918-1921 

R. A. Yoder, 1884-1899 C. R. Patterson, 1922-1926 

J. A. Arndt, 1899-1900 J. L. Norris, 1927-1937 

J. C. Dietz, 1900-1903 A. W. Lippard, 1938-1942 

H. J. Matthias, 1903-1905 J. E. Walker, 1942-1948 

J. L. Cromer, 1907-1913 John Hall, 1948-1950 

F. M. Speagle, 1914-1917 W. D. Yount, 1950- 



276 



History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 



SALEM, ROWAN CO. 

Salem Church is located in Rowan County about six miles west 
from Salisbury on the Beatty's Ford Road. It was organized August 
IS, 1850, by Rev. B. N. Hopkins, when he was preaching at Enochville. 
The name "Salem" was given a few years after it was organized. 
Officers elected were: Henry J. Barringer and Charles Miller, Elders; 
and Peter Barger and Jesse Lyerly, Deacons. 

Their first church was a log building and stood a little to the 
northeast of the present church. The thirty-acre tract of land owned 
by the church, was bought from Mr. John Barger for $100.00 on April 
29, 1854. The second church was a frame structure 36 x 50 feet, for 
which the cornerstone was laid December 16, 1882, by Rev. V. R. Stickley 
and Rev. W. A. Lutz. The building was dedicated on Sunday, November 
25, 1883, at a meeting of Conference held in the new church. Rev. 
W. A. Lutz preached the sermon. Rev. J. D. Shirey, D.D., was pastor. 
In 1906 a tower was built. 

Salem had been in a parish with one or more churches until 1923, 
when it called Rev. W. G. Cobb as fulltime pastor for that one church. 
It was about that time when transepts and Sunday School rooms were 
added to the building. This church was destroyed by fire on Easter 
Sunday, 1950. 

On February 19, 1950, ground was broken for the present brick 
church. Dr. F. L. Conrad, president of Synod; and Pastor Paul E. 
Moose were in charge of the services. The cornerstone was laid on 
September 24, 1950, by President F. L. Conrad, Pastor P. E. Moose, and 
Dr. Morgan. This is a beautiful church, with full basement and 
Sunday School rooms all equipped for progressive services. The property 
is valued at $160,000.00. This building commemorates the One Hundredth 
Anniversary of the congregation. The first service in the completed 
building was held on June 10, 1951, with sermon by the Pastor, Rev. 
P. E. Moose. 

The congregation has built two parsonages, the first in 1895 while 
Rev. V. y. Boozer was pastor, and the second in 1935 during Dr. Boozer's 
second pastorate. 



List of Pastors: 



B. N. Hopkins, 1850-1852 
J. S. Heilig, 1853-1858 
B. C. Hall, Sup., 1859 
Jacob Crim, 1860-1862 
Simeon Scherer, 1863-1868 
Samuel Rothrock, 1869-1875 
V. R. Stickley, 1876-1882 
J. D. Shirey, 1882-1889 
H. C. Haithcox, 1890 
B. W. Cronk, 1891-1893 
V. Y. Boozer, 1894-1895 
H. N. Miller, 1895-1897 



H. A. Trexler, 1897-1907 
B. S. Brown, Sr., 1908-1910 
O. W. Aderholdt, 1911-1912 
G. O. Ritchie, 1913-1918 
R. T. Troutman, 1918-1920 
J. Arthur Linn, Sup., 1921 
W. G. Cobb, 1923-1926 
J. M. Senter, 1926-1931 
V. Y. Boozer, 1931-1935 
M. R. Farris, 1936-1943 
P. E. Moose, 1943- 



History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 



277 



SARDIS, CATAWBA CO. 

Sardis Church is located in Catawba County, about ten miles south 
from Hickory. This church was organized March 2, 1867, by Rev. A. 
J. Fox, M.D., and was received into the Tennessee Synod on the 19th 
of the following November. 

Their first building was constructed of hand-hewn framing and 
handdressed weatherboarding applied vertically. It was dedicated 
March 30, 1867. The present church was built while Rev. J. P. Miller 
was pastor, about 1891. It is a durable frame structure of heart pine 
timber. The builders were Adly Huffman and Alfred Baker in that 
community. 

In 1950 Sardis and Salem congregations were placed in a parish 
together and called Rev. Wade D. Yount. At the same time Sardis 
built a beautiful new parsonage near that church. 



List of Pastors: 



A. J. Fox, 1867-1872 
M. L. Little, 1872-1882 
J. A. Rudisill, 1882-1890 
J. P. Miller, 1891-1894 
W. P. Cline, 1894-1896 
R. A. Yoder, 1896-1899 
J. C. Wessinger, 1899-1902 
W. P. Cline, Supply, 1903 
R. H. Cline, Supply, 1904 
W. P. Cline, Supply, 1905 
J. F. Deal, 1906-1907 



M. L. Pence, 1908-1915 
F. M, Speagle, Sup., 1915 
D. L. Miller, 1916-1918 
J. A. Yount, 1919 
J. J. Bickley, 1920-1921 

B. J. Wessinger, 1922-1926 
L. L. Lohr, 1927-1930 

C. K. Wise, Supply, 1931 
W. A. Sigman, 1931-1937 
W. J. Roof, 1937-1950 
Wade D. Yount, 1950- 



SHARON, GIBSONVILLE 

Sharon Church is located in the town of Gibsonville, in Alamance 
County. The church was organized October 28, 1894, with an enrollment 
of eight members, in charge of Rev. J. R. Sikes. The name chosen was 
Sharon Evangelical Lutheran Church. Pastor Sikes continued to serve 
the congregation until his death. 

Services were held downstairs in the Masonic Lodge Building. 
On April 5, 1897, a lot was secured on the corner of what is now Sharon 
and Burke Streets, and a frame church 32 x 42 feet was constructed. 
The cornerstone was laid November 21, 1897 by Pastor E. P. Parker, Rev. 
H. M. Brown and Rev. D. I. Offman, and the first service was held in 
the new church January 23, 1898. The Northern Conference met in this 
church on November 20-22, 1903, when their pastor. Rev. C. A. Brown, 
was elected president, and Rev. J. L. Morgan was elected secretary. 



278 History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 

This church was dedicated on Sunday, November 22, 1903, by Dr. 
R. C. Holland, President of Synod; Rev. C. A. Brown, and Rev. C. B. 
Miller. 

While Rev. Enoch Hite was pastor, it was decided, in 1935, to 
build a new church, but Pastor Hite died August 31st that year, which 
delayed the building. Rev. John L. Morgan became pastor March 1, 
1936, and soon a new lot was purchased and a new brick church was 
constructed. This is a splendid building, with full basement, and is 
nicely furnished. The cornerstone was laid and the church dedicated 
on October 8, 1939, in charge of Pastor Morgan and the President of 
Synod. 

In 1948 a new brick parsonage was built on a lot next to the 
church. For many years this church was in a parish with Friedens 
and Peace, but in 1949 Friedens decided to provide for its own fulltime 
pastor, so Sharon and Peace formed a parish and called Rev. W. J. 
Roof, who became pastor February 1, 1950. 

List of Pastors: 

J. R. Sikes, 1894 Y. Von A. Riser, 1916-1921 

E. P. Parker, 1895-1901 G. W. McClanahan, 1921-1931 
C. A. Brown, 1901-1903 Enoch Hite, 1931-1935 

G. H. L. Lingle, 1904-1905 John L. Morgan, 1936-1943 

F. M. Harr, 1905-1910 M. R. Farris, 1943-1949 
C. J. Sox, 1910-1913 W. J. Roof, 1950-1952 
W. G. Cobb, Supply, 1913 E. K. Bodie, 1952- 

B. S. Dasher, 1913-1915 



SHARON, IREDELL 

Sharon Church is located in Iredell County, some nine miles 
west from Statesville, and about three miles north from the main State 
highway leading to Hickory. 

This church was organized in 1842, by Rev. J. W. Hull, then 
pastor at St. Martin Church, in that county. A deed for six and one- 
half acres of land was made in 1854, by Eli Bost, Silas Bost, and 
Angeline Massey, to Sharon's Elders — Peter Little, Peter Smith, and 
William Fulbright. 

A small brick church was soon erected, but was used for some 
years with a dirt floor. In 1882 Rev. J. C. Moser became pastor, and 
led the congregation in building sixteen feet to the front end of the 
church, and placing a floor in the entire building. A. T. Smith super- 
vised the work, and William Cline was foreman in the brick work. 

In 1941-1942 — their centennial year, while Rev. Dutton was pastor 
— a five-room annex was built to provide Sunday School rooms. The 



History of the Lutheran Church in N, C. 



279 



chancel was re-arranged, new floor put down, the entire interior of 
the church refinished, and a new roof put on the old building. 

When Mt. Herman Church was organized in 1896, most of those 
members were transferred from Sharon. 

For a number of years Sharon, St. Martin's, and Mt. Herman, 
were in a parish together, but after re-uniting of the two Synods, in 
1921, Sharon, Mt. Herman, and St. Paul's were placed in a parish. At 
present Sharon and Mt. Herman constitute the parish. 

They have recently built a nice new parsonage near Mt. Herman, 
which is jointly owned. 



List of Pastors: 



J. W. Hull, 1842-1846 
Daniel Efird 
Adam Efird 

Timothy Moser, 1850-1858 
J. M. Smith, 1858-1874 
A. J. Fox, 1874-1876 
P. C. Henkel, 1876-1881 
J. C. Moser, 1882-1884 

C. H. Bernheim, 1884-1886 

D. J. Settlemyre, 1886-1891 
G. A. Romoser, 1891-1893 
R. W. Huebsch, 1893-1897 
W. L. Darr, 1898-1907 



,C. J. Sox, 1907-1910 



W. D. Haltiwanger, 1912-1917 
J. M. Senter, 1918-1920 

D. L. Miller, 1921-1924 
Stu. W. C. Boliek, 1924 
Q. O. Lyerly, 1925-1928 
Stu. R. H. Kepley, 1929 
R. H. Kepley, 1930-1932 
Stu. R. B. Fisher, 1932 

O. G. Swicegood, 1932-1935 
P. E. Moose, 1935-1938 
W. H. Button, 1939-1943 
R. M. Carpenter, 1943-1950 
Stu. E. W. Ridenhour, 1950 

E. W. Ridenhour, 1951- 



SHILOH. ALEXANDER CO. 

Shiloh Church is located in Alexander County, on the highway 
from Hickory to Taylorsville near Catawba River. The original church 
here was known as Pisgah Lutheran Church, which belonged to the 
Tennessee Synod; however, we do not know when it was organized. 
In the year 1886 a division arose in the congregation, and as a result 
a large number of the members, under the pastoral leadership of Rev. 
C. H. Bernheim, organized a new congregation under the name of 
Shiloh Lutheran Church. 

Their first church was built in 1886-1887 and was dedicated in 
the year 1888 by Pastor Bernheim and Dr. R. A. Yoder. Their present 
house of worship is a beautiful brick structure, built under the in- 
spiring leadership of their pastor, the Rev. Cline W. Harbinson. It was 
opened for services in 1952. 

When this church was first organized, it was placed in a parish 
with Friendship and Philadelphia at Granite Falls, but at present it 



280 



History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 



is in a parish with St. Luke's Church in Catawba County. The two 
churches have a new brick parsonage located a short distance from 
St. Luke's Church. 



List of Pastors: 



C. H. Bernheim, 1886-1890 
J. P. Miller, 1890-1893 
A. L. Crouse, 1894-1896 
R. L. Fritz, J. L. Cromer, 
and E. J. Sox, 
Supply, 1896-1907 
J. P. Price, 1907-1909 
A. L. Bolick, 1909-1913 
J. A. Yount, 1913-1921 



M. L. Pence, 1924-1926 
C. E. Lutz, 1927-1930 
L. P. Boland, 1930-1939 
Cline W. Harbinson, 

1940-1943 
H. Belk Leonard, 1943-1946 
Cline W. Harbinson, 

1947- 



SHILOH, FORSYTH CO. 

Shiloh Lutheran Church is located about ten miles west from 
Winston-Salem in Forsyth County, North Carolina, not far from the 
village of Lewisville. For many years it has been associated in a 
parish with Nazareth at Rural Hall. It is not known when it was 
organized; however, there were German Lutheran settlers living in 
that section long before the church was organized, and prior to the 
coming of the Moravians in 1752. It is supposed to have been organized 
by Rev. Adolph Nussman about 1777, with the help of Rev. Arends, 
For this, see Minutes of Synod 1831, pages 9 and 14. It was first called 
Muddy Creek Church. 

The first location was about a fourth of a mile north of the 
present church. There is a fairly large cemetery there. The first 
church was of logs, about 20 x 30 feet, with a gallery. The present 
building is of brick, and is located on the main highway. Its dimen- 
sions are about 32 x 46 feet. It was erected during 1880 and 1882, 
having been begun while Rev. W. A. Lutz was pastor there. It was 
dedicated in 1884. This church shares in the ownership of a parsonage 
at Rural Hall. Sunday School rooms, with basement, were added in 
1939, and new chancel arrangement made. 

It is difficult to determine the list of pastors for this congregation, 
as records are incomplete; however, the following may be approxi- 
mately correct: 



List of Pastors: 



Adolph Nussman, 1774-1787 
Arnold Roschen, 1788-1800 
Paul Henkel, 1800-1805 
Gottlieb Schober, 1810-1830 
J. R. Rosenmiller, 1830-1832 
Adam Grimes, 1832-1836 



H. A. Trexler, 1892-1897 
R. L. Bame, 1897-1899 
Stu. P. E. Monroe, 1900 
C. A. Phillips, 1902-1904 
V. R. Stickley, 1906-1907 
J. W. Strickler, 1907-1909 



History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 



281 



Jacob Crim, 1837-1840 
Adam Grimes, 1840-1847 
John Swicegood, 1847-1853 
Whitson Kimball, 1860-1861 
M. M. Miller, 1861 
J. R. Sikes, 1862-1864 
J. D. Bowles, 1865 
John Swicegood, 1865-1867 
C. H. Bernheim, 1877-1878 
W. A. Lutz, 1878-1881 
E. P. Parker, 1882-1887 
W. R. Ketchie, 1887-1888 
H. M. Brown, 1888-1892 



J. A. L. Miller, 1909-1914 
R. T. Troutman, Sup., 1916 
W. C. Buck, 1917-1925 
Stu. C. E. Lutz, 1925 
Stu. R. L. Fisher, 1926 
W. J. Moretz, 1927-1931 
Stu. O. W. Sink, 1932 
Stu. W. N. Yount, 1933-1934 
W. N. Yount, 1935-1940 
D. B. Summers, 1942-1945 
L. O. Roof,. 1945-1948 
B. E. Petrea, 1949- 



SILVER VALLEY, DAVIDSON CO. 

Silver Valley Lutheran Church is located in Davidson County 
twelve miles east of Lexington on the Asheboro highway. 

This work was started by Rev. Roy L. Fisher, while he was 
pastor of the Holly Grove Parish in this county. Week-day Summer 
Schools were conducted by him in the nearby Silver Valley School Build- 
ing, with an attendance of over 300 children. From this beginning, 
work was carried on for a church building and an organized con- 
gregation. 

A lot across the highway from the school building was donated 
tor a church, and in September 1939 the building was begun. Much of 
the work on the church was done by members of the group without 
charge. Some help was given by the Synod, the Missionary Society, and 
other organizations, but the burden of the work was by the local mission. 

The church was completed, and the opening service was held 
July 21, 1940. This is a splendid brick veneered building and is churchly 
in appearance. At the time it was built, it was valued at $8,000.00; 
however, it was built for less money. After the house of worship was 
completed and opened for services, the organization of the church was 
completed on Sunday, September 1, 1940, with 63 members. Pastor 
Fisher was in charge of the organization, assisted by Dr. C. L. Miller, 
Rev. Voigt Sink, and the President of Synod. 

In 1951, while Rev. C. C. Adderholdt was pastor, a house and lot 
near the church were purchased for a parsonage, jointly with Lebanon 
congregation, at a price of $7,000.00. 



List of Pastors : 



R. L. Fisher, 1940-1942 

W. B. Aull, 1942-1943 

C. R. Patterson, Sup., 1944-1947 



C. S. Wessinger, 1947-1948 
C. C. Adderholdt, 1949-1952 
E. F. K. Roof, 1953- 



282 History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 



ST. ANDREWS, ANDREWS 

St. Andrews Lutheran Church is located on Main Street in the 
town of Andrews, Cherokee County, N. C. 

A Lutheran Sunday School was carried on in this place for 
many years before there was a Lutheran church. The work was 
sponsored largely by Mrs. F. P. Cover. A congregation was organized 
here on October 22, 1924, with nine members enrolled, by Rev. N. D. 
Yount. 

The lot for the church was donated to the North Carolina Synod 
for church purposes by Mrs. Cover. 

The cornerstone was laid September 25, 1927, by President J. L. 
Morgan and Pastor W. H. Lefstead. This is an attractive brick 
building with a full basement for Sunday School. The Women's Mis- 
sionary Society of the North Carolina Synod gave liberally to the 
building of the church. The church was dedicated by the President 
of Synod on April 29, 1928, assisted by Pastor Lefstead and Dr. W. H. 
Greever. The church with its furnishings was valued at $20,000.00. 

The parsonage was built, under the leadership of Rev. Edwin F. 
Troutman, at a cost of $3,000.00. It was ready for occupancy August 
19, 1936. 

The pipe organ is a gift from Mrs. F. P. Cover, who gave liberally 
to the building of the church also. 

List of Pastors: 

N. D. Yount, 1924-1925 C. W. Carpenter, Sup., 1941 

J. F. Davis, Sup., 1926-1927 Ernest Felker, 1941-1945 

W. H. Lefstead, 1927-1929 W. L. Smith, 1945-1947 
E. F. Troutman, 1929-1937 Supplied, 1947-1949 

O. G. Swicegood, 1937-1938 W. E. Hall, 1949-1952 
K. Y. Huddle, 1938-1940 



ST. ANDREW'S, CONCORD 

St. Andrew's Church is located on West Depot Street in Concord. 
The church was organized September 10, 1893, by Rev. G. H. Cox, D.D., 
president of Synod. 

Their work was started and at first was financed by St. James 
congregation in Concord, under the direction of Rev. W. G. Campbell. 

The first building was a frame structure 32 x 46 feet, which was 
completed in 1890. It was dedicated November 7, 1897, by Rev. V. R. 
Stickley, president of Synod; Pastor H. A. McCullough, Rev. C. B. 



I 



History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 



283 



Miller, and Rev. J. Q. Wertz. A nice frame parsonage was built near 
the church in 1899. It was destroyed by fire on September 21, 1900, 
but was rebuilt right away by the congregation. 

On August 15, 1902, their church was destroyed by a wind storm, 
but the congregation, led by Pastor E. Fulenwider, proceeded, at once, 
to rebuild. While Rev. L. C. Bumgarner was pastor, a new brick church, 
with full basement, was built at a cost of around $12,000.00. The cor- 
nerstone was laid June 1, 1941, by Pastor Bumgarner and the President 
of Synod, assisted by Dr. C. L. Miller, Dr. V. R. Cromer, and Rev. W. T. 
Nau. This church was dedicated November 8, 1942, by Pastor Bum- 
garner and the President of Synod. This is a splendid building. A 
parsonage was recently purchased a few blocks east from the church. 

List of Pastors: 



G. H. Cox, 1893 

J. D. Shealey, 1894-1895 

H. A. McCullough, 

1895-1898 
W. B. Oney, 1898-1900 
C. A. Brown, 1900-1901 
J. L. Morgan, 

Supply, 1901 
E. Fulenwider, 1902-1904 
J. W. Strickler, 1905-1907 
C. R. Pless, Supply, 1907 
V. R. Stickley, 

Supply, 1907-1908 



C. A. Brown, Supply, 1908 
, J. P. Miller, Supply, 1909 
C. R. Pless, 1909-1911 
G. O. Ritchie, Supply, 1912 
S. A. Zimbeck, 1912-1913 
J. H. C. Fisher, Sup., 1914 

B. S. Dasher, 1915-1917 

C. H. Day, 1918-1920 

J. B. Moose, Sup., 1920 
M. L. Kester, 1921-1928 
L. C. Bumgarner, 1928-1947 
J. L. Griffin, 1948-1950 
W. D. Wise, 1950- 



ST. ANDREW'S CHURCH. HICKORY 

St. Andrew's Lutheran Church is located opposite the southwest 
corner of Lenoir Rhyne College campus, in the City of Hickory, N. C. 
This church was organized on January 29, 1893, with thirty-eight 
members, by Rev. A. L. Crouse. Service was held in the chapel of 
Lenoir College. Officers elected were: William Yoder and Benjamin 
A. Whitener, Elders; Rufus Mosteller and A. Y. Sigmon, Deacons; and 
Reuben Miller, Treasurer. 

The first four pastors of this church were all members of the 
college faculty, namely: Rev. A. L. Crouse, Rev. R. L. Fritz, Rev. R. A. 
Yoder, and Rev. W. P. Cline. After worshiping for about ten years in 
the college chapel, plans were worked out, under the pastoral leader- 
ship of Rev. C. L. Miller, for a church building, to be located in the 
southeast section of the college campus. Work on the building was 
started in May 1907, and the cornerstone was laid on October the 14th 
that same year. The building was of brick, and was large enough 



284 



History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 



for that time, but it was lacking in Sunday School facilities. The 
formal opening service for this building was held in connection with 
the college commencement in the year 1910. 

Soon after Rev. P. J. Bame became pastor of St. Andrew's con- 
gregation in 1924, a lot was bought for a new church, at a cost of 
$11,500.00 — the same lot which the church now occupies — and provis- 
ion was made with the Synod to solicit funds from the congregations 
over the Synod to help carry the proposition to completion. But, the 
plan was not carried out, and the lot was sold. 

Then later, at the annual meeting of Synod in St. Andrew's Church 
in 1940, the need for a new and larger church for this congregation and 
the college was again brought to Synod's attention, whereupon Mr. 




St. Andrews Lutheran Church 
Hickory, North Carolina 

W. K. Mauney offered to give $1000.00 towards a Fifty Thousand Dollar 
Fund for such a building, if carried out. The proposition was approved 
by the Synod, and a committee was appointed to cooperate with St. 
Andrew's Church in the undertaking. The committee appointed by 
Synod was: The President of Synod, W. K. Mauney and Carl V. Cline, 
for the Synod; and P. E. Monroe and C. M. Yoder for the college. 

A committee was later appointed by St. Andrew's congregation, 
composed of: M. E. Newton, Garland Davis, E. J. Sox, Albert Keiser, 
and F. P. Cauble, to cooperate with the committee appointed by Synod. 
These two committees then organized into a Joint Committee, with the 
President of Synod as chairman, and Dr. Albert Keiser as secretary. 
This Joint Committee had general supervision over the entire under- 



History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 285 

taking, while a local Building Committee, composed of Dr. Albert 
Keiser, chairman, E. J. Sox, and F. P. Cauble, was in charge of build- 
ing operations. 

A solicitation for $150,000.00 was made for the new church, on a 
basis of one-third from the local congregation, one-third from the 
college or its friends, and one-third from the congregations over the 
Synod. The contracts for the erection of the new St. Andrew's Church 
called for an expenditure of $260,000.00. The Mauney Family of Kings 
Mountain contributed $55,000.00 towards the three story John D. Mauney 
Educational Building, and the Miles Aderholdt Family gave the same 
amount, mainly towards the organ, the chapel, and the balcony. 
The whole outlay for lots, architect's fees, buildings, and furnishings 
amounted to $365,000.00. 

The groundbreaking service for this new church was conducted on 
May 23, 1950, in charge of their pastor. Rev. F. P. Cauble, Ph.D., and 
Rev. F. L. Conrad, D.D., president of Synod, together with a number of 
other ministers. The cornerstone was laid October 29, 1950, by Pastor 
Cauble, Dr. V. R. Cromer, President of Lenoir Rhyne College, and 
Rev. Geo. Frederick Schott, Secretary of Synod. The formal opening of 
the completed church was on Sunday, December 9, 1951, with Dr. Cauble 
in charge of the service, and the sermon by Dr. Conrad, President of 
Synod. 

This is a beautiful Gothic church, designed and furnished along 
conservative Lutheran lines throughout. It has basement, equipped for 
educational and other present day needs of a modern church building. 
There is also a beautiful chapel which lends itself to the needs of small 
gatherings. This church fills a long-felt need for this congregation, the 
college, and the Synod. 

List of Pastors: 

A. L. Crouse, 1893 J. D. Mauney, 1911-1917 

R. L. Fritz, 1894-1895 J. C. Peery, 1917-1920 

R. A. Yoder, 1896-1901 R. B. Peery, 1920-1924 

W. P. Cline, 1901-1904 P. J. Bame, 1924-1927 

R. A. Yoder, 1905 J. D. Mauney, 1928-1941 

C. L. Miller, 1905-1911 F. P. Cauble, 1941-1953 



ST. ANDREWS, NEW BERN 

St. Andrews Lutheran Church in New Bern is located on Neuse 
Boulevard and Chattawka Lane. 

This field was brought to Synod's attention at the 1947 Con- 
vention. Subsequently, it was surveyed and approved by the Board 
of American Missions. Rev. R. B. Cuthbertson was called here April 
1, 1948, and in December of that year the lot, 325 x 200 feet, facing on 



286 History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 

Neuse Boulevard was secured for $9,250.00 on a fifty-fifty basis by the 
mission and the Synod. The Brotherhood loaned the mission $2,000.00 
on its half of the purchase price. 

The church was organized January 9, 1949, with 64 members by 
Pastor Cuthbertson. The service was held in the reception room of a 
business building. Dr. V. R. Cromer, then President of Synod, preached 
in the morning, and Dr. J. L. Morgan in the afternoon. 

The building is a brick structure with a nave for preaching services 
and assembly and classrooms for educational purposes. The contract 
price was $35,000.00. The Board of American Missions and the Synodi- 
cal Brotherhood each loaned money for the building, and liberal donations 
were made by the Synodical Missionary Society and other agencies to 
help pay off these loans. 

Groundbreaking services were held July 2, 1950, by Rev. F. L. 
Conrad, D.D., now President of Synod, and by Pastor Cuthbertson. The 
church was opened for services March 11, 1951. Pastor Cuthbertson 
conducted the office of blessing for the organ and chancel furniture. 
President Conrad brought the message that morning, and Dr. J. L. 
Morgan in the afternoon. 

List of Pastors: 

R. B. Cuthbertson, 1948-1950 G. L. Freeze, 1951- 



ST. DAVID'S, KANNAPOLIS 

St. David's Lutheran Church is located in Rowan County at the 
corner of 22nd Street and Plaza Drive in the northern part of Kan- 
napolis. It was originally known as Blackwelder Park church. 

This congregation was started by Rev. J. D .Sheppard, while he 
was pastor of Bethany Church in Kannapolis, in the spring of 1937. A 
lot was purchased, and a small frame chapel was built, most of the 
work done by the pastor and members. The church was opened for 
services on July 4, 1937, at which time a Sunday School was organized. 

Rev. Leo Smith became pastor of this mission, along with Re- 
deemer in Jackson Park, on June 10, 1937. The congregation was 
regularly organized January 2, 1938 with thirty-seven members. Rev. 
Smith resigned January 20, 1943 and was succeeded by Rev. David F. 
Cooper on March 1, the same year. During his ministry the congre- 
gation grew to where a larger church was needed. He resigned July 
1, 1947, at which time the church went on a fulltime basis. Rev. J. A. 
Ritchie was called November 1, 1947. 

A new lot was purchased for a parsonage and church at a cost 
of $2,200.00 on a fifty-fifty basis by the congregation and Synod. The 



History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 287 

parsonage was built in 1947-1948 at a cost of $12,000.00 for which $5,- 
000.00 was loaned by the Brotherhood, but was soon repaid. 

The contract for the new church was let November 28, 1949 for 
$33,500.00. Groundbreaking services were held December 4, 1949, by 
President Conrad and Pastor Ritchie. The cornerstone was laid April 
16, 1950 by President F. L. Conrad, Pastor J. A. Ritchie, and Dr. J. L. 
Morgan. The new church was opened for services June 11, 1950 by 
Pastor Ritchie and President F. L. Conrad. 

This is a beautiful colonial type building of brick construction 
and was made possible by the aid of a $15,000.00 loan from the Brother- 
hood. 

In 1950 the name was changed from that of Blackwelder Park 
church to St. David's church. 

List of Pastors: 

J. D. Sheppard, 1937 J. A. Ritchie, 1947-1951 

W. L. Smith, 1937-1943 W. G. Cobb, 1951- 

D. F. Cooper, 1943-1947 



ST. ENOCH CHURCH. ROWAN COUNTY 

St. Enoch Church is located in the village of Enochville, two miles 
west from Kannapolis, in Rowan County. This church was organized 
by Rev. P. A. Strobel in August 1835, in Mr. Philip Overcash's home. 
The land for the church was given to the congregation by Mr. Jacob 
Overcash. 

The first church building was a frame structure, 30x40 feet, 
which is said to have cost $1500.00. It was built during the fall of 
1835, and was dedicated on September 8, 1839, by Pastor P. A. Strobel, 
Rev. Samuel Rothrock, and Rev. William Artz. 

The first unit of the present brick church is 50x70 feet in di- 
mensions, with a balcony over the front end. The brick for this building 
were made by hand locally, by members of the congregation, and the 
heavy timbers were hand hewn. The building was completed in 1873, and 
was dedicated, free of all debts, on September 20, 1874, by Rev. A. D. L. 
Moser, Rev. P. A. Strobel, Rev. Samuel Rothrock, and Rev. W. A. Julian. 

In 1941 a three story Educational Building was added to the back 
of the church, under Rev. D. F. Swicegood's pastoral leadership, which 
provides much needed facilities for Sunday School and other organi- 
zational activities. A tower, with electrically lighted spire, was also 
built about the same time. In 1952 a vestibule, corresponding to the 
architecture of the old building, was added to the front of the church. 



288 



History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 



Also, tower chimes have been installed as a part of the church 
equipment. 

The old parsonage, which was constructed jointly by St. Enoch 
and Trinity congregations many years ago, was sold and moved away 
to make room for a new brick parsonage in 1939. 

St. Enoch Church was interested in the education of her young 
people, and lent encouragement to the establishment of one of the 
first High Schools in the county — Enochville High School — conducted by 
members of her own congregation, among whom we mention Prof. 
R. G. Kizer, Prof. F. B. Brown, and Prof. P. E. Wright. This was the home 
church of the Deaton brothers, also of Jethro Yost, J. L. Smith and J. E. 
Smith, all Lutheran ministers. 



List of Pastors: 



P. A. Strobel, 1835-1841 
W. G. Harter, 1841-1849 
J. H. Coffman, 1849-1850 
B. N. Hopkins, 1850-1852 
J. S. Heililg, 1852-1866 
J. W. Barrier, 1866-1867 
A. D. L. Moser, 1868-1873 
W. A. Julian, 1874-1879 
W. A. Lutz, 1880-1891 
V. R. Stickley, 1892-1903 



J. L. Morgan, 1903-1907 

C. M. Fox, 1908 

G. H. Cox, 1908-1911 
O. B. Shearouse, 1912-1917 
B. S. Dasher, 1918-1924 
L. P. Boland, 1924-1931 
G. L. Barger, 1932-1937 

D. F. Swicegood, 1938-1945 
G. B. Goodman, 1945- 



ST. JAMES LUTHERAN CHURCH, CONCORD 



St. James Lutheran Church in Concord is located on the corner 
of Union and Corbin Streets. The first location, however, was on what 
was then known as Fayetteville (now Corbin) Street, leading out 
towards Mt. Pleasant. 

This church was organized on Sunday, June 4, 1843 with "about 
sixty members", by Rev, W. G. Harter, who was then pastor of Cold 
Water Lutheran Church, from which most of the members came. 

On January 23, 1845, a lot was purcased on Corbin Street, on 
which their first church was built. A log school house was also 
built there about the same time, which for awhile was used as a 
place of worship, until the church was ready. The church was a frame 
structure, almost square, with two entrance doors — one for the men and 
the other for the women. In 1874 a bell was placed in the tower, and an 
organ was purchased for the church that same year. 

The North Carolina Synod held its annual meeting in this church 
in 1844. Then, May 20-26, 1863, this congregation was host to the 



History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 289 

first regular convention of the General Synod of the Lutheran Church 
in the Confederate States of America. This General Synod was organized 
in St. John's Lutheran Church, in Salisbury, N. C, May 17, 1862, (due 
to war conditions), with representatives from the Synods of Virginia, 
Western Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Georgia. In 
1886, the Women's Synodical Missionary Society was organized in St. 
James church. 

By the year 1880, the congregation had grown to where it felt 
the need of a larger house of worship, so a committee, composed of 
A. J. Blackwelder, D. R. Hoover, and W. H. Bloome, was appointed to 
secure a new location for the church. The corner lot, on Corbin and 
Union Streets, where the present church stands, was purchased for 
$900.00. This was on October 27, 1880. 

Under the pastoral leadership of Rev. S. T. Hallman, a new brick 
church was constructed. This building was provided with a ground 
floor under a part of the structure, for Sunday School purposes. The 
spire was 115 feet high, in which a bell was installed. This church 
was dedicated May 10, 1891, by Dr. S. T. Hallman, Rev. J. M. Hedrick, 
Rev. C. A. Rose, and their pastor. Rev. W. G. Campbell. 

St. James Church and her pastors have sponsored the organiza- 
tion of three other congregations in or near Concord — Mt. Hermon in 1881, 
St. Andrews in 1893, and Calvary in 1913. 

A house and lot, just back of the church, facing Corbin Street, was 
purchased by the congregation for a parsonage, which served their needs 
until 1927, when it was removed to give room for their church expan- 
sion program. 

Under the pastoral leadership of Rev. L. A. Thomas, D.D., a new 
stone church was begun in 1927. The cornerstone of this church was 
laid October 9, 1927, by Pastor Thomas, Dr. H. B. Schaeffer, and Presi- 
dent J. L. Morgan. This is a beautiful church, with full ground story, 
and an educational plant annexed at the back end of the main build- 
ing. It represents an outlay of around $210,000.00. 

The completed building was first opened for divine services on 
September 2, 1928. Due to a financial depression which extended 
over the entire country, deferred payments on the building had to be 
carried for a number of years, but by 1942 the church was freed of all 
indebtedness, and was solemnly dedicated as a house of God, on Sun- 
day, June 13, 1943, by the President of Synod, assisted by Rev. S. W. 
Hahn, D.D., who was then pastor of the congregation. Dr. L. A. Thomas, 
and Dr. P. E. Monroe. 

Meanwhile, Mr. A. L. Brown, a member of the congregation, made 
it possible to install a new pipe organ, and the Hendrix family paid 
for a set of chimes for the church. 

In 1942 a house and lot on Grove Street was purchased by the 
congregation and fitted up for a parsonage. This church enjoys the 



290 History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 

cooperative support of a large number of capable leaders, in both the 
local as well as the general causes of the Church. 

List of Pastors: 

W. G. Harter, 1843-1854 C. B. Miller, 1896-1902 

D. I. Dreher, 1854-1869 W. H. Hiller, 1902-1904 

W. H. Cone, Sup., 1869-1872 J. E. Schenk, 1905-1910 

C. H. Bernheim, 1872-1873 C. P. MacLaughlin, 1910-1916 

W. W. Bowers, 1873 M. L. Stirewalt, 1916-1922 

. J. H. Harry, 1874-1875 L. A. Thomas, 1922-1930 
L. A. Bikle, 1876-1877 . P. E. Monroe, 1930-1934 

S. T. Hallman, 1880-1885 V. R. Cromer, 1936-1941 

G. F. Schaeffer, 1885-1886 S. W. Hahn, 1942-1950 

W. G. Campbell, 1886-1893 G. R. Whittecar, 1951- 
M. G. G. Scherer, 1893-1896 



ST. JAMES, FAYETTEVILLE 

St. James Lutheran Church in Fayetteville is located on the cor- 
ner of Morganton Road and Dobbin Avenue. 

This field was surveyed and developed by Rev. Roscoe B. Fisher, 
under the direction of the Mission Committee of Synod. For the first 
several months the financial support of the work was carried by the 
North Carolina Synod, with some help by the Board of American 
Missions. 

The first service was held in the Y.M.C.A. rooms October 20, 
1935, by Pastor Fisher with twenty-two in attendance. The church was 
organized on June 28, 1936, in the Y.M.C.A. rooms with forty-seven 
members by Rev. R. B. Fisher. The sermon for the occasion was preached 
by Dr. J. L. Morgan, the President of Synod. The choir of St. Paul's 
Church in Wilmington assisted in the music. 

On September 16, 1936, a lot 100x200 feet on Morgan Road was 
purchased for $2,800.00, same to be paid on a fifty-fifty basis by the 
mission and the Synod. Funds for the church building were provided 
jointly by the mission, the Synod, the Missionary Society, the Brother- 
hood, and the Luther League, amounting to about $16,000. 

Groundbreaking services were conducted January 10, 1938 by 
Pastor Fisher, Rev. G. H. Rhodes, D.D., and the President of Synod. 
The completed church was formally opened on Easter Sunday, April 
17, 1938, in charge of Pastor Fisher. The sermon was by the President 
of Synod. A new Hammond organ was installed and in use for the 
opening services. 



History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 291 

Pastor Fisher resigned September 30, 1938, and was succeeded by 
Rev. C. L. Miller, D.D., as supply for one year. Rev. George W. Lingle 
became pastor June 1, 1939. 

In November 1940, the congregation purchased the house and lot 
just back of the church lot on Dobbin Avenue for $4,000.00 for a 
parsonage. 

The church was dedicated, free of debt, on Palm Sunday, April 
IS, 1943, by the President of Synod, assisted by Pastor Lingle, and two 
former pastors — Rev. R. B. Fisher and Dr. C. L. Miller. (Rev. Lingle 
resigned March 13, 1945, and on May 12 Rev. J. D. Mauney took charge 
of the work.) 

This congregation gave helpful service in looking after service- 
men during World War II, and after the Service Center was closed in 
Fayetteville in 1946, the congregation constructed a Recreational Build- 
ing to be used by soldiers at Fort Bragg and for the social needs of 
the church. The building cost $7,500.00. In 1950 a Lutheran Parish 
Center was opened here. 

List of Pastors: 

R. B. Fisher, 1935-1938 G. W. Lingle, 1939-1945 

C. L. Miller, Sup., 1938-1939 . J. D. Mauney, Jr., 1945- 



ST. JAMES, NEWTON 

St. James Lutheran Church is located in Catawba County, about 
two miles east of Newton. 

It appears that this congregation was first started in what was 
known as the old Haas Church, a log building, which stood one mile 
South of the present St. James Church. 

We are reliably informed that in the year 1834 a deed was 
issued from Lincoln County in the name of David Haas and George 
A. Ikard for land for this church. 

The church here was to be available for use by different denomi- 
nations, so both Lutheran and Reformed groups worshiped here until 
1852, when the Reformed members withdrew and built a church of 
their own in the town of Newton. The Lutherans continued to wor- 
ship at the old place until after the close of the Civil War. The old 
log building has now given way, leaving only the graveyard to mark 
the place. 

The change from the old location to the present one occurred 
about 1867. The old Communion Record Book shows that a communion 
service was held in the Haas Church September 23, 1866, and that 
another such service was held May 23, 1867, at St. James Church. The 
names of the communicants were practically the same in each service. 

It is known that when the public school opened at the St. James 



292 History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 

locality in the fall of 1867, the new church was under construction. 
The land on which this church was built was deeded to the church 
by M. M. Hewitt. 

Rev. Polycarp Henkel was the pastor here during the time of 
relocation and construction of the first frame church. 

The present concrete block building was put up while Rev. J. 
Allen Arndt was pastor, and it was dedicated on May 8, 1910 by Pastor 
W. D. Wise and Rev. W. J. Boger, D.D., then President of the Tennessee 
Synod. This is a splendid building and churchly in its arrangement. 

A new Educational Building, two stories and a basement with 
classrooms, was constructed in 1929, under the pastoral leadership 
of Dr. W. J. Boger. 

A new brick parsonage was built in 1948, soon after the present 
pastor, Rev. Garth Lee Hill, became pastor. 

List of Pastors: 

H. Goodman, 1851 W. D. Wise, Asst., 1908-1909 

P. C. Henkel, 1851-1869 W. D. Wise, 1909-1912 

J. M. Smith, 1870-1879 C. L Morgan, 1913-1917 

R. A. Yoder, 1879-1896 W. J. Boger, 1918-1936 

J. L. Cromer, 1896-1900 Leo Smith, 1936 

R. A. Yoder, 1901-1905 E. R. Lineberger, 1936-1947 

J. A. Arndt, 1906-1909 Garth Lee Hill, 1948- 



ST. JAMES, ROCKWELL 

St. James Lutheran Church is located in Rockwell in Rowan 
County, N. C. 

This church was organized on April 21, 1907, with 50 members 
by Rev. J. A. Linn. A lot was soon secured on the main highway in 
the southern part of the town, near the bend of the road. A neat frame 
church was built, and on March 18, 1908, was dedicated. St. James 
and Emmanuel Church, together, built a parsonage in 1919, which 
was first occupied by Rev. C. R. Pless and family. 

Soon after Rev. C. P. Fisher, D.D., became pastor, January 1, 
1926, a lot for a new church was purchased on the corner of the main 
highway and the road to China Grove. The first brick for the new 
church was laid July 6, 1926, and on March 6, 1927 the congregation 
began holding services in the basement of the new church. The cor- 
nerstone was laid May 20, 1928, by Pastor C. P. Fisher and President 
J. L. Morgan. The main church was opened for divine services on May 
19, 1929. During Rev. J. D. Sheppard's pastorate, the balance of the 
church debt was paid off, and the church dedicated on May 5, 1935, 
by Pastor Sheppard, Rev. C. P. Fisher, D.D., and Dr. Morgan. 



History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 



293 



A new brick parsonage, by the south side of the church, was 
built at a cost of $14,000.00 while Rev. E. L. Misenheimer was in 
charge of the work in 1948. 

The congregation became self-supporting in March 1949, with 
Rev. C. P. Fisher, Jr., as pastor. 

On July 17, 1949, the new parsonage was dedicated by Pastor 
Fisher and the President of Synod. Also a new organ was installed. 



List of Pastors: 



J. A. Linn, 1907-1911 
R. R. Sowers, 1911-1913 
N. D. Bodie, 1914-1918 
C. R. Pless, 1919-1922 
E. F. K. Roof, 1922-1925 



C. P. Fisher, Sr., 1926-1930 
J. D. Sheppard, 1930-1935 
J. E. Walker, 1935-1942 
E. L, Misenheimer, 1943-1949 
C. P. Fisher, Jr., 1949- 



ST. JOHN'S, ALEXANDER CO. 

St. John's Lutheran Church is located in Alexander County, about 
four miles southwest of Taylorsville. 

It was organized September 12, 1915, in a school house in that 
community by Rev. J. A. Yount. Most of the members of this organi- 
zation came from Friendship Church about four miles west of St. 
John's. 

The church building is a frame structure, erected in 1916, under 
the pastoral supervision of Pastor Yount. 

This church was in a parish with Friendship and Shiloh until 
1946, when the parish was re- arranged so that St. John's is left alone. 
Rev. D. P. Rudisill, Ph.D., at Lenoir Rhyne College is supplying the 
congregation. 

List of Pastors: 



J. A. Yount, 1915-1918 
J. P. Price, Supply, 1919 
J. A. Yount, 1920-1924 
M. L. Pence, 1924-1926 
E. J. Sox, Supply, 

1926-1927 
C. E. Lutz, 1927-1931 



E. J. Sox, Supply, 1931 
L. P. Boland, 1932-1940 

C. W. Harbinson, 1940-1943 
Albert Keiser, 

Supply, 1943-1944 
H. B. Leonard, 1944-1946 

D. P. Rudisill, Supply, 1946- 



ST. JOHN'S, ASHEBORO 

St. John's Church is located on South Park Street in Asheboro, 
Randolph County, N. C, 

In April 1938 some of the pastors of the Eastern Conference made 
a survey of Asheboro to ascertain the needs for a Lutheran Church in 



294 History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 

that place. The findings were encouraging, and Rev. Carl H. Fisher, 
then in charge of the Liberty parish, was asked to look after the 
field until definite arrangements could be made. 

The mission was taken up by the Mission Committee of Synod, 
and on September 1, 1938, Rev. Roscoe B. Fisher was placed in charge 
of the work. The first service held here was on October 30, 1938, in 
the Park Street School Building. From that time on, services were 
held at different places — school buildings, the Carolina Theater, the 
Presbyterian Church, and the agricultural Building, respectively. 

This field was surveyed and approved by the proper agencies of 
the Board of American Missions. 

A lot 138x200 feet was purchased on South Park Street for 
$3,400.00, same to be paid for on a fifty-fifty basis by the mission 
and the Synod. The church building was financed jointly by the mis- 
sion, the Synod, the Missionary Society, the Brotherhood, and the 
Luther League. The building was started early in the year 1940 and 
was completed and opened for services on October 27, 1940. The services 
were in charge of Pastor Roscoe B. Fisher, assisted by the officers of 
Synod. The total cost was $19,500.00. 

The parsonage, just back of the church, was also built under Rev. 
Fisher's direction at a cost of $6,690.00 in 1942. 

On September 15, 1942, Rev. W. N. Yount became pastor here 
and led the congregation to paying off the church debt. The church 
was dedicated, free of debt, June 24, 1945, by President J. L. Morgan, 
Pastor W. N. Yount, and Rev. Roscoe B. Fisher, with greetings by other 
visiting brethren. At the same meeting the new pipe organ was 
dedicated by Pastor Yount, which had been purchased in 1944 at a 
cost of $2,000.00. 

Pastor Yount resigned May 31, 1951, and on July 1, 1951, Rev. 
C. E. Bernhardt became pastor. Since Rev. Bernhardt became pastor, 
the church has been redecorated, and the parsonage dedicated free 
of debt. 

List of Pastors: 

R. B. Fisher, 1938-1942 W. N. Yount, 1942-1951 

C. E. Bernhardt, 1951- 



ST. JOHN'S. CABARRUS CO. 

St. John's Church is located in Cabarrus County, six miles east 
of Concord on the highway leading to Mt. Pleasant. 

It is not definitely known when this church was first organized, 
but it is known to be one of the oldest Lutheran churches in North 
Carolina. The congregation itself gives 1745 as the year of its 
organized beginning, as noted in the Minutes of Synod. 

When first organized, this church owned its church property 
jointly with a German Reformed congregation. Judging from the writ- 



History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 



295 



St. John's, Cabarrus County 




ings of different historians, these two denominations were sufficiently 
numerous at that time to form a fairly large congregation. 

Their first place of worship was about two miles north of Mt. 
Pleasant, not far from Buffalo Creek. Hence, the organization was 
called the Dutch Buffalo Creek Church. The building was of unhewn 
pine logs, with no windows, floor, or chimney. 

On Thanksgiving Day 1894, a stone monument was unveiled at 
that place to mark the original location. The stone was provided by 
St. John's Church, and their pastor. Rev. J. Q. Wertz, and Rev. G. H, 
Cox, D.D., were in charge of the services. 

The second church was located three miles west from the first 
place, on land now owned by Harry Cline, half a mile east of the present 
church. This building was also of logs, not much better than the first 
one. We have no record of the dates for this building. The old grave- 
yard marks the location, called the "Church Piece." 

In 1771, the Lutherans decided to build a church of their own. 
A location was selected where the cemetery is now, a third log house 



296 History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 

was built thereon. It was larger and better than the other two. 
This building was constructed under the supervision and largely 
at the expense of one member of the congregation — Captain John Paul 
Barringer. Out of appreciation for his generosity the congregation had 
a special pew made for him and his family. The builder of the church 
was Daniel Jarrett. 

At this time the name was changed from Dutch Buffalo Creek 
'^Jhurch, to St. John's Lutheran Church. 

The next major aim of the congregation was to secure a pastor. 
Efforts had been made to get a pastor from Pennsylvania, but none was 
to be had. So, St. John's Church cooperated with other Lutheran con- 
gregations in securing a commission from Governor Tryon for selected 
men to go to Germany in quest of a minister and a teacher. The com- 
mission was issued July 19, 1771, authorizing Christopher Lyerly and 
Christopher Rendleman to visit the old country with the hope of find- 
ing a minister and a school teacher, and at the same time find financial 
help for their church work. 

The two commissioners left home in 1772, by horseback to Char- 
leston, S. C, whence they sailed to London, and from there to Hanover, 
Germany, where they secured the services of Rev. Adolph Nussman as 
minister, and Prof. John Gottfried Arends as teacher. The return trip 
was made in 1773. Some writers think that Pastor Nussman made the 
village of Salisbury his first home for a short while upon landing here, 
but soon moved to the Organ Church commmunity. Letting that be 
as it may, he moved to St. John's Church, in Cabarrus County (formerly 
Mecklenburg) during the latter part of 1774 or early in 1775, where he 
lived until his death in 1794. Prof. Arends settled at Organ Church 
and took charge of the church schools, until 1775, at which time he was 
ordained to the gospel ministry, and became pastor of Organ Church 
for ten years. 

About this time Jacob Fegert, Marx House, and Jacob Thieme 
entered 100 acres of government land in trust for the church, under 
date of October 22, 1782. This is the land on which they had already 
built their church, in 1771, and on which their present church stands. 
Pastor Nussmann wrote a Constitution for St. John's Church about this 
time, which the church adopted, that became a guide in both doctrine 
and practice for Lutheranism in those trying days. 

In 1784 pledges were received for funds for a new church. This 
was their fourth building, and was a frame structure, built on the same 
ground where the previous one stood, but much larger. 

Captain Barringer showed deep interest in this building, just 
as he had in the other one, and we are told that the special pew made 
for him and his family was placed in the new church as a mark of 
continued appreciation for him by the congregation. This church was 
dedicated July 4, 1785 by Pastor Nussman. 

The present brick building is the fifth house of worship for this 
congregation. It was built in 1845, and may have been intended to 



History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 



297 



mark their first centennial year. The building originally was 55x80 
feet in dimensions, with a gallery, and the doors in the sides of the 
building. It was dedicated August 22, 1846. 

In 1888 this building was rearranged, so as to have the main 
entrance door at the west end, and the gallery was removed. It was 
rededicated February 10, 1889, by Pastor S. L. Keller. 

St. John's Church, like all of the older churches, took deep 
interest in schools for their children. Sixteen young men from that 
congregation entered the Gospel ministry: They are: J. W. Barrier, 
Paul Barringer, D. M. Blackwelder, V. C. Ridenhour, E. L. Ritchie, M. L. 
Ridenhour, G. O. Ritchie, C. P. Fisher, B. E. Petrea, H. S. Petrea, J. B. 
Moose, C. E. Ridenhour, B. A. Barringer, J. E. Walker, J. D. Barringer, 
and L. David Miller, 

A three story brick Educational Building was added to the old 
church in 1937, under the pastoral leadership of Dr. L. D. Miller. Then 
in 1947, while Rev. H. W. Cauble was pastor here, the nave of the 
church was completely rebuilt, and new furniture installed. 

A granite monument was placed on the church grounds by the 
congregation in memory of Rev. Adolph Nussman, their first pastor, 
which was unveiled November 10, 1935, by their pastor. Rev. L. D. 
Miller, assisted by other ministers and laymen. 

The Two Hundredth Anniversary of the organization was observed 
August 5, 1945 including the previous week. 

Upon calling their present pastor. Rev. C. Lee Shipton, the con- 
gregation replaced the old frame parsonage with a new and modern 
brick home. 

St. John's Church has a glorious history, but space forbids us to 
include it all here. 

List of Pastors : 



Adolph Nussman, 1774-1794 
C. A. G. Storch, 1796-1797 
Adam N. Marcard, 1797-1800 

C. A. G. Storch, 1800-1821 
Daniel Scherer, 1821-1831 
Henry Graeber, 1832-1843 
John D. Scheck, 1844-1857 
G. D. Bernheim, 1858-1860 
J. B. Anthony, 1860-1867 
L. C. Groseclose, 1867-1872 

D. M. Henkel, 1872-1875 
R. W. Petrea, 1876-1887 
S. L. Keller, 1887-1890 
Peter Miller, 1890-1893 



J. Q. Wertz, 1894-1896 

S. D. Steffey, 1896-1901 

H. N. Miller, Supply, 1902 

T. C. Parker, 1904 

W. H. Hiller, 1905-1906 

V. Y. Boozer, 1908-1909 

J. J. Long, 1910 

C. R. Pless, 1912-1915 

G. H. Cox, 1916-1920 

R. T. Troutman, 1921-1923 

L. D. Miller, 1924-1944 

H. W. Cauble, 1944-1949 

C. Lee Shipton, 1949- 



298 History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 
st. john's, caldwell co. 

St. John's Lutheran Church is located in Caldwell County, six 
miles east of Lenoir, on the Taylorsville highway. 

This church was developed in connection with the District Synod 
of Ohio. Their house of worship was built in 1889. It is a small frame 
building, but it is churchly. 

In 1925 the congregation applied for admission into The United 
Lutheran Synod of North Carolina and was so received. Rev. P. D. 
Risinger, then pastor of St. Stephen's Church in Lenoir, gave them 
pastoral service. This arrangement continues to this time. 

List of Pastors : 

P. D. Risinger, 1924-1928 R. B. Fisher, 1944-1952 

, L. S. Miller, 1928-1943 C. S. King, 1952 



ST. JOHN'S CHURCH, CATAWBA 

St. John's Lutheran Church is located in Catawba County, about 
two miles northeast of Conover. This church dates back to the time 
when Rev. J. Gottfried Arends had charge of all the Lutheran churches 
west of the Catawba River. If Pastor Arends did not organize the 
congregation, he certainly fathered it, and is regarded as its first pastor. 

The deed to the land for the church is dated November 28, 
1798, and was given by Henry Bobe (Pope), "to the elders of the United 
Congregation and their successors in office for ever in trust for said 
congregation." It would appear that there was an organized congre- 
gation here for some time prior to the purchase of the church land, 
because there were church officers at that time. 

From the beginning it was a union church, whereby the church 
property was owned jointly by Lutherans and German Reformed, and 
possibly by others for awhile. The larger number of the members who 
started this congregation originally belonged to St. Paul's Church, west 
of Newton, but who lived near the Catawba River, and felt the need 
of a church nearer their homes. 

The History of the Reformed Church in North Carolina, states 
that the first house of worship was built in 1812. Where they held 
services from the time they organized in 1798 until this time, we do 
not know. Their first building was of logs, and had a gallery for 
colored people. This building was replaced in 1883 with a large brick 
building. 

About the middle of last century a split occurred in this con- 
gregation, when some of the members went off to the Joint Synod of 
Ohio; however, the larger number remained in the Tennessee Synod. 



History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 299 

St. John's Church was organized before there was any Synod to belong 
to; but when the North Carolina Synod was organized in 1803, this 
congregation became a member of it, and it is believed helped to 
effect its organization. When the Tennessee Synod was organized in 
1820, St. John's declined to affiliate with either body for four years. 
Then in 1824 it united with the Tennessee Synod, where it remained until 
1897, when it united with the Missouri Synod. The property interests 
formerly held by minority groups have more recently been purchased 
by the Missouri Synod congregation. 

In 1949, the old brick church was remodeled and enlarged, but 
soon after it was completed, it was destroyed by fire. But, without 
delay, the congregation erected a new and better church than the 
one that burned. 

Although not now a member of the North Carolina Synod, St. John's 
has occupied an important place in the life of this Synod, and is there- 
fore given this place in her history. Pastors of both the North Caro- 
lina and the Tennessee Synods who served this congregation, prior to 
its connection with the Missouri Synod are as follows: 

List of Pastors : 

J. G. Arends P. C. Henkel Daniel Moser 

Paul Henkel J. M. Smith Adam Miller, Jr. 

Philip Henkel J. C. Moser C. H. Bernheim 



ST. JOHN'S, CHERRYVILLE 

St. John's Church is located on West Church Street in Cherryville, 
Gaston County. Services, looking forward to an organization, were first 
held in an old granary. The church was organized in 1881. One of 
the charter members was still living in March 1952 — Mrs. Alice Beam 
Craft. The church lot on South Church Street was given to the congre- 
gation by Mr. Henry Summitt. The first church was a small frame 
building, on the same lot where the present church stands. Mr. Sum- 
mitt also gave the old cemetery property, which for a while was used 
as a community burying ground. 

The present brick church was built in the year 1902, while Rev. 
R. H. Cline was pastor. It is a splendid building, but needed better 
Sunday School facilities. So classrooms were added while Rev. B. 
D. Wessinger, D.D., was pastor. The present brick parsonage was 
also built while Pastor Wessinger was pastor in the year 1921. 

A second addition to the church, for Sunday School purposes 
was built in 1936 under Rev. W. G. Cobb's pastoral supervision, and 
was dedicated in 1938 by Pastor Cobb and the President of Synod. 
In a few years the Sunday School was again calling for more room, 
so in 1949, another addition was built. Like the previous one, this 
addition is two stories high with classrooms, and is connected to the 



300 History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 

main building. This building was dedicated May 27, 1951 by Pastor 
Cobb with the sermon by President F. L. Conrad. 

This congregation has contributed liberally to the cause of Chris- 
tion higher education and to our Synodical home missions. Some of its 
members took a leading part in starting a Lutheran Church in Chapel 
Hill. 

List of Pastors: 

M. L. Little, 1881-1891 J. C. Dietz, 1909-1912 

L. L. Lohr, 1892-1893 B. D. Wessinger, 1913-1924 

John J. George, 1893-1899 C. A. Linn, 1924-1927 

R. H. Cline, 1900-1903 W. G. Cobb, 1927-1951 

E. H. Kohn, 1904-1909 L. C. Trexler, 1952- 



ST. JOHN'S, HUDSON 

St. John's Church is located in the town of Hudson, in Caldwell 
County. 

Work was carried on here by visiting ministers for several years 
prior to the organization of a congregation. Their first church was built 
about 1904, under the general leadership of Rev. J. L. Cromer, with 
P. M. Throneburg, John L. Sigmon, and M. M. Throneburg giving their 
financial and loyal backing. The church was organized by Rev. J. 
A. Yount, May 15, 1910, with 12 members. Up until 1920 this mission 
received preaching services only once a month. Then it was placed in 
the Granite Falls parish. 

During Rev. C. O. Lippard's pastorate, the present brick church 
was built. Groundbreaking services were held April 28, 1930 by Pastor 
Lippard and the President of Synod. During the building period, 
services were held in a nearby school building. 

The cornerstone was laid June 29, 1930 by Pastor Lippard and 
Dr. J. L. Morgan. The basement was soon completed and was opened 
for worship purposes on August 1, 1930. Under the pastoral leadership 
of Rev. R. M. Carpenter, the building was completed in 1937 and was 
dedicated August 21, 1938 by Pastor Carpenter and the President of 
Synod. 

In 1950 the congregation decided to go on a fulltime pastoral 
basis, and called Rev. F. C. Morehead. Following his coming a new 
parsonage was built; also additional rooms were provided for the 
Sunday School. 

List of Pastors: 

J. A. Yount, 1910-1911 C. O. Lippard, 1930-1932 

James Deal, 1911-1912 R. M. Carpenter, 1932-1943 

J. A. Yount, 1913-1920 R. B. Sigmon, 1943-1949 

F. L. Conrad, 1920-1922 J. K. Cobb, 1949-1950 

J. J. Bickley, 1922-1925 F. C. Morehead, 1950- 
P. C. Sigmon, 1925-1930 



History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 



301 



ST. JOHN'S, SALISBURY 

The first location of St. John's Lutheran Church in Salisbury 
was on North Lee Street. It was later located on North Main and 
Liberty Streets; then it was moved to its present location on West 
Innes and Church Streets. We do not know when this church was 
organized. The date of organization carried by the congregation in 
her records is 1747. This date has, for a number of years, been listed 
in the Minutes of Synod. 

It is known that Lutheran families settled in this vicinity at an 
early date, and, being a church-loving people, they would be interested 
in establishing a place of worship as quickly as possible. 

One of the early Lutheran settlers here was John Lewis Beard, 
who purchased a number of lots in the town in the year 1765. Bern- 




St. John's Lutheran Church 

Salisbury, North Carolina 



302 History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 

heim, in his "History of the Lutheran Church in the Carolinas," tells 
us of a bereavement which befell this Beard family, when a much 
beloved daughter was taken by death and was laid to rest in one of 
her father's newly purchased lots. 

Soon thereafter, in the year 1768, Mr. Beard deeded the lot, hal- 
lowed by the new-made grave, to the Trustees of the German Lutheran 
congregation on which to build a Lutheran Church. 

The congregation proceeded at once to build its first house of 
worship on this lot, which lot is located on North Lee Street. The build- 
ing was a log structure and was the first church of any kind built in 
Salisbury. 

The deed for that lot provided for other church groups to hold 
services in the building when not used by the Lutherans. It turned 
out that the Lutheran Church became vacant for some years, and 
about 1818 permission was granted to the Episcopal brethren to hold 
services in the church during the vacancy. Meanwhile the old log church 
was replaced by a new frame building. The Episcopalians contributed 
liberally toward the building, and so claimed an interest in the property. 
In order to clear the matter, however, the Lutherans reimbursed the 
Episcopalians for what they had contributed toward the building, and 
the Lutherans were recognized thereby as the rightful owner of the 
property in its entirety. 

In 1849 a new location was secured for a church on the corner 
of North Main and Liberty Streets. This was their third building, which 
was constructed of brick, at a cost of $2500.00. There was a basement 
under the building, which for a while was used for public school pur- 
poses. Rev. J. H. Coffman was pastor when this church was erected; 
however, it was not completed until 1857, after Rev. L. C. Groseclose 
became pastor. It was dedicated on May 26, 1857. 

The fourth building was put up in 1883, on the same lot as that 
for the previous one. This was also a brick building. Rev. W. J. Smith 
was the pastor when this building was started, but it was not completed 
until 1884, when Rev. William Stoudenmire became pastor. 

On October 1, 1886, Rev. C. B. King became pastor of this church, 
but upon arriving in the field he found the work in bad condition, with 
building debts facing them. But he soon brought about an improved 
condition, and by the third Sunday in May 1889, the new church was 
dedicated free of all indebtedness. Pastor King was assisted by Dr. 
S. W. Bowman in the dedicatory service. 

While Dr. L. E. Busby was pastor here, additional rooms were 
provided for Sunday School purposes. This was about the year 1899. 
Then, under Dr. M. M. Kinard's administration, still further room was 
provided. 

A few years after Rev. E. Fulenwider, D.D., became pastor in 1920, 
the lot now occupied on the corner of Innes and Church Streets was 
purchased on which to build their fifth house of worship. Plans were 



History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 303 

later drawn for a brick structure to take care of a large and growing 
congregation and Sunday School. The cornerstone of the new building 
was laid June 30, 1926 by Pastor Fulenwider and President J. L. Mor- 
gan. This church with furnishings cost approximately $225,000.00. It 
was formally opened for services January 2, 1927. 

Dr. Fulenwider resigned in 1930, and was succeeded by Dr. M. 
L. Stirewalt. For the next several years the congregation was constantly 
faced with a heavy building debt, during a nation wide business de- 
pression. 

The building was freed of all debt during Dr. P. D. Brown's pas- 
torate and was dedicated October 1, 1944. President J. L. Morgan per- 
formed the act of dedication, and Dr. E. Fulenwider and Dr. M. L. Stire- 
walt, former pastors, brought the morning and evening messages for 
the occasion. Pastor Brown had charge of the program. 

This church was redecorated in 1946, under the direction of Dr. 
Brown, at a cost of $40,000.00. 

The congregation at one time owned a parsonage on their church 
lot on North Main Street. However, a rented house was used most of 
the time until more recent years. In 1931, while Dr. M. L. Stirewalt 
was pastor, a new brick parsonage was built on Marsh Street at a 
cost of around $12,000.00. 

St. John's Church has been host to a number of important his- 
torical meetings, among them we mention the following: 

1. The Lutheran Synod of North Carolina held its first meeting 
here, May 2, 1803, at which time the Synod was organized. 

2. A meeting of representatives of Southern Synods was held here 
in 1862 to plan for a General Synod in the South. 

3. In 1884 a Diet was held here, composed of representatives of 
Southern Synods, which brought about the formation of the 
United Synod in the South. 

4. The Quadri-Centennial Celebration by the United Synods in 
the South was held here in 1917, at which time plans were 
approved for the merger of the General Synod, the General 
Council, and the United Synod in the South into The United 
Lutheran Church in America. 

5. The Women's Missionary Society met here in 1924. 

6. The Luther League met here in 1926. 

7. The Sesqui-Centennial Celebration of The United Evangel- 
ical Lutheran Synod of North Carolina May 4 - 7, 1953. 

Dr. P. D. Brown was called away by death, August 3, 1952, which 
brought great sorrow to the entire congregation. The work was then 
continued by their assistant pastor. Rev. H. E. Rhoads. 

List of Pastors: 
Adolph Nussmann, 1773-1774 T. W. Dosh, 1876-1877 

J. G. Arends, 1775-1785 W. J. Smith, 1878-1883 

C. A. G. Storch, 1788 William Stoudenmire, 1884-1886 



304 



History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 



John Reck, 1826-1831 

D. P. Rosenmiller, 1831-1832 
John T. Tablet, Supply, 

1832-1833 
Samuel Rothrock, 1833-1835 

E. A. Bolles, Supply, 1835-1836 
Samuel Rothrock, 1836-1839 

J. D. Scheck, 1840-1844 
Samuel Rothrock, Supply, 

1844-1845 
J. B. Anthony, Supply, 1845-1846 
J. H. Coffman, 1848-1852 
Simeon Scherer, 1852-1855 
L. C. Groseclose, 1857-1865 
N. Aldrich, 1865-1867 
Simeon Scherer and 
W. H. Cone, 1867-1872 
J. G. Neiffer, 1872-1876 



C. B. King, 1886-1896 
L. E. Busby, 1896-1902 
J. H. Wilson, 1903-1906 
M. M. Kinard, 1906-1920 
E. Fulenwider, 1920-1930 
M. L. Stirewalt, 1930-1938 
P. D. Brown, 1939-1952 
E. L. Misenheimer, 

Asst. Pastor, 1940-1943 
H. W. Cauble, 

Asst. Pastor, 1943-1944 
S. L. Swing, Asst. Pastor, 

1946-1947 
R. H. Terry, 

Asst. Pastor, 1948-1950 
H. E. Rhoads, 

Asst. Pastor, 1951- 



ST. JOHN'S. STATESVILLE 

St. John's Church is located on the corner of West Front and Mul- 
berry Streets in Statesville. The church was organized April 8, 1888 
in an upstairs room over Leonard's Music Store on Broad Street with 
eight members enrolled. The following officers were elected: J. S. 
Frye and L. C. Dietz, Elders; and E. A. Frye, Deacon and Secretary. Rev. 
D. J. Settlemyre, then pastor at St. Martin's and Sharon, was in charge 
of these services. 

A lot was purchased on the corner of Front and Meeting Streets 
for $350.00 and on July 12, 1890, a contract was let for a church building 
30 X 50 feet, brick structure, with a tower. The cornerstone was laid by 
the Pastor, Rev. D. J. Settlemyre, Rev. A. L. Crouse, and Rev. C. H. Bern- 
heim. In order to get needed money to carry on the building, three of 
the members — J. S. Frye, L. A. Dietz, and M. J. Dietz — mortgaged their 
homes until funds could be raised by the congregation. The building 
was completed by the end of 1890, and January 8 - 11, 1891, a four-day 
preaching service was held in the new church, in charge of Pastor Settle- 
myre, Rev. J. C. Moser, and Rev. A. L. Crouse. The congregation 
numbered twenty-three. 

By August 8, 1908, the church was free of debt and was dedicated 
by the pastor. Rev. W. A. Lutz, and others. About the time Rev. O. W. 
Aderholdt, D.D., became pastor, April 1, 1920, a building was purchased 
for a parsonage. Also a lot for a new church was purchased on the 
corner of Front and Mulberry Streets for the sum of $6,000.00. In 1921 
a contract was signed for building a new church at a cost of $32,659.00. 
The cornerstone was laid October 30, 1921, by Pastor Aderholdt and others. 
The church was completed in 1922 and was formally opened on Sunday, 



History of the Lutheran Church in N. C, 305 

January 5, 1923, by the Pastor; Dr. E. J. Sox, and Dr. F. C. Longacre guest 
speakers. This is a churchly building, with basement for organizational 
work. It was dedicated November 7, 1926 by Pastor J. D. Kinard, Dr. 
E. J. Sox, and the President of Synod. The total valuation when com- 
pleted was $52,000.00. 

The parsonage was worked over during Pastor Thornburg's pas- 
torate. Funds are now being raised for an Educational Building. The 
present pastor, Rev. J. K. Lasley reports a confirmed membership of 
about 500. 

List of Pastors: 

D. J. Settlemyre, 1888-1892 A. R. Beck, 1917-1919 

W. P. Cline, Supply, 1893-1897 O. W. Aderholdt, 1920-1924 

J. C. Moser, Supply, 1893-1897 J. D. Kinard, 1924-1929 

W. L. Darr, 1898-1905 J. L. Thornburg, 1930-1945 

W. A. Lutz, 1905-1916 J. K. Lasley, 1945- 



ST. LUKE'S CHURCH, CATAWBA COUNTY 

St. Luke's Church is located in Catawba County, on the Springs 
Road, aboue five miles northeast from Hickory. This church was or- 
ganized by Rev. J. Alonzo Yount, August 18, 1921, with twenty-one 
members. 

Most of these members came from St. Peter's Church, follow- 
ing a division in that old congregation, which resulted in a divided 
ownership of that church property, as well as in members, — one part 
adhering to the Tennessee Synod, and the other going with the Mis- 
souri Synod. The Tennessee group organized themselves into this 
St. Luke's congregation, and located elsewhere, while the Missouri 
group remained at the old church, each holding a part interest in the 
old church property. Then, under the pastoral guidance of St. Luke's 
present pastor, the Rev. Cline W. Harbinson, St. Luke's sold her share in 
the St. Peter's property to the Missouri congregation in the year 1947, 
for $1,000.00, thus ending the dual arrangement. 

St. Luke's was first located about a mile south of where Sipes 
Orchard is now located, where a small frame church was built. But, 
in a short while, another location was selected, in the Oxford Ford 
section, and the recently constructed church was dismantled and recon- 
structed at the new location. 

But this second house and lot was disposed of in 1949, and their 
present location secured. With the cooperation of Synod, the Brother- 
hood, and the Missionary Society, a nice brick church, with Sunday 
School quarters, was constructed. The church vv^as completed, and 



306 History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 

on February 20, 1949, was opened for divine service. The corner- 
stone was laid at the opening service, on February 20, 1949, in charge 
of Pastor Harbinson, assisted by President V. R. Cromer, and Dr. J. L. 
Morgan. This church is valued at $25,000.00. 

A new parsonage for this parish was built, in the St. Luke's com- 
munity, by the parish composed of St. Luke and Shiloh, in 1947. 

Except for a few short intervals. Rev. J. A. Yount served this 
church as pastor, in connection with other congregations, from its be- 
ginning in 1901 until 1923, at about which time it was placed in a 
parish with the church in Claremont. 

List of Pastors: 

J. A. Yount, 1901-1923 G. A. Phillips, 1944-1947 

J. C. Dietz, 1925-1927 C. W. Harbinson, 1947- 

R. B. Sigmon, 1928-1943 



ST. LUKE'S, CHARLOTTE 

St. Luke's Lutheran Church in Charlotte is located on East Boule- 
vard and Dilworth Road. 

This church was organized in the Dilworth Grade School audi- 
torium with eighty members, on New Year's Day, 1928. The organiza- 
tion was under the direction of Dr. J. L. Morgan, President of Synod; 
Dr. A. D. R. Hancher of the Board of American Missions; and Dr. J. F. 
Crigler, pastor of St. Mark's Church. 

Student A. W. Lippard served during the summer of 1928. Dr. R. 
L. Patterson supplied from November 1, 1928, to June 30, 1929. Rev. 
H. P. Wyrick was called as the first regular pastor July 1, 1929. 

The original brick building was erected in 1930 at a cost of 
$23,125.00. The cornerstone of this building was laid June 22, 1930, 
by Pastor Wyrick and representatives of Synod. The building was open- 
ed for services November 30, 1930, with the sermon by Pastor Wyrick, 
and Rev. S. White Rhyne in charge of the Liturgy. 

The new Educational Building was erected during 1947-1948 at 
an approximate cost of $60,000.00. The cornerstone for this building 
was laid January 4, 1948, by Rev. V. R. Cromer, D.D., then president 
of Synod, and by Pastor Wyrick. The building was formally opened for 
religious purposes January 23, 1949. 

A house and lot was purchased on East Boulevard, for a par- 
sonage, at a cost of $16,780.00, which was first occupied by Pastor 
Wyrick and family on July 2, 1951. 



History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 307 

St. Luke's congregation has, from the very beginning of her or- 
ganization, carried on her work without calling on Synod or the Mis- 
sion Board for current assistance in financing her program. 

List of Pastors: 

Student A. W. Lippard, R. L. Patterson, D.D., 

Supply, 1928 Supply, 1928-1929 

H. P. Wyrick, 1929- 



ST. LUKE'S, DAVIDSON CO 

St. Luke's Lutheran Church is located in Davidson County, N. C, 
in the village of Tyro, about eight miles west from Lexington. Origi- 
nally it was sometimes referred to as the Church of the German Meeting 
House, or the Sandy Creek Meeting House, and Swicegood's Meeting 
House. The first of these names indicates the nationality of the peo- 
ple, the second that of the location on Sandy Creek, and the third the 
donor of the land, Adam Swicegood and his wife, Mary Cathron Swice- 
good. 

It is not known in what year the church was organized. While 
the deed for the land bears the date 1790, the very nature of this deed 
shows that there was an organized body there prior to that year, which 
reads in part as follows: "This deed made the eighth day of January 
in the year of our Lord 1790, between Adam Swicegood and his wife, 
Mary Cathron, of the County of Rowan and the state of North Carolina, 
Party, of the one part, and Henry Clemmens and John Gobel of said 
county and state. Trustees for the congregation that upholds the German 
Meeting House, known and designated by the name Sandy Creek Meet- 
ing House, on the waters of Sandy Creek, Witnesseth that for and in 
consideration of the good will and regard for the said Adam Swicegood 
and Mary Cathron, his wife, hath for the propagation of the Gospel 
and sundry other reasons moving thereto, together with five shillings 
sterling by the said Henry Clemmens and John Gobel, Trustees for the 
Sandy Creek Congregation in hand paid by the trustees in behalf of 
the said congregation, to the sealing of these presents, the receipt and 
payment whereof is hereby acknowledged, hath granted, bargained, 
sold, aliened, enfoeffed, convey and confirm unto the said Henry Clem- 
mens and John Gobel, trustees for the aforesaid congregation forever." 

Thus it will be seen that there was a going congregation here at 
the time the land was purchased; however, we do not know how far 
back of that date it may have begun. But we do know that there were 
German settlers in that territory as much as forty years prior to that 
time, and it is not unreasonable to assume that they, being a God- 
fearing and church-loving people, would have made provision for relig- 
ious services during those years, even though they did not have a set- 



308 History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 

tied pastor. This congregation was from the first entirely Lutheran, 
and held exclusive title to its property. It belonged entirely to the 
North Carolina Synod. 

Their first house of worship was made of logs, 24 x 30 feet, but 
we do not know when it was built. It was destroyed by fire. The 
second building was patterned after the first one, while the third one 
was a frame structure, about the same size as that of the other two. 
It was erected in 1835. The fourth building was also a frame struc- 
ture, about 35x58 feet; with a gallery, annex, and vestry rooms, with 
a seating capacity of around four hundred. It was erected in 1861, at 
a cost, at that time, of about $1,300.00, and was dedicated the same year, 
by Rev. W. A. Julian. This building was later improved under the 
pastoral leadership of Rev. D. W. Michael, at a cost of $300.00. 

The fifth building is a brick structure 40x92 feet, with transepts 
extending ten feet on each side. It has a seating capacity of over 
four hundred. This building was constructed under the pastoral lead- 
ership of Rev. C. R. Pless, at a cost of $35,000.00. It is located on the 
lot that was formerly occupied by an Academy belonging to St. Luke's 
congregation, in the village of Tyro, one-half mile east from the old 
church. This lot, first donated by Mr. R. F. Thompson for school pur- 
poses, was later given by his son, G. M. Thompson, for the church's 
location. In 1950 a modern Educational Building was constructed, un- 
der the guidance of Rev. John A. Pless. 

This congregation, along with Pilgrim, Becks, and Bethany, helped 
to build a parsonage in Tyro, in the year 1854. Then, in 1934, while 
Rev. C. R. Pless was pastor, St. Luke's and Pilgrim, then constituting 
the parish, built a new parsonage, near the present St. Luke's church. 
However, in 1951, these two congregations mutually agreed that each 
should have a full-time pastor, and Rev. John A. Pless was called by 
St. Luke's to give his full time to that congregation, beginning May 1, 
that year. 

It is most likely that St. Luke's Church took part in the organi- 
zation of Synod in 1803, forasmuch as their pastor, Rev. Paul Henkel, 
was one of the four ministers who helped to effect the organization. 

In 1880, while Rev. C. H. Bernheim was pastor here, an Academy 
for general education was opened in Tyro, under the auspices of this 
congregation. A lot was donated for the purpose by R. F. Thompson 
and his wife, members of St. Luke's Church, and a building was erected. 
This building was used for school purposes until 1921. 

It is most probable that Rev. Nussmann and Rev. Arends made 
pastoral visits to these people from time to time, from the time of their 
arrival in North Carolina in 1773 up to the coming of Rev. C. E. Bern- 
hardt, who was the first regular pastor here. Then, beginning with 
Rev. Bernhardt, the list of pastors, so far as we can find, is as follows: 

List of Pastors: 

C. E. Bernhardt, 1787-1788 C. H. Bernheim, 1874-1878 

Arnold Roschen, 1788-1800 P. E. Zink, 1878-1883 



History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 



309 



Paul Henkel, 1800-1805 
Ludwig Markert, 1805-1816 
Gottlieb Schober, Suppdy, 1816 
J. W. Meyer, 1816-1817 
Daniel Walcher, 1817-1821 
Jacob Miller, 1821-1827 
D. P. Rosenmiller, 1830-1831 
John Tabler, 1831-1833 
Daniel Jenkins, 1833-1834 
Benjamin Arey, 1837 
Jacob Crim, 1839-1842 
J. B. Anthony, 1847-1848 
L. C. Groseclose, 1849-1854 
W. A. Julian, 1854-1863 
W. H. Cone, 1864-1865 
A. D. L. Moser, 1867 
J. D. Bowles, 1871-1784 



R. W. Petrea, 1883-1885 
J. M. Hedrick, 1885-1886 
D. W. Michael, 1887-1891 
Whitson Kimball, 1892-1894 
T. H. Strohecker, 1896 
P. J. Wade, 1898-1905 
G. H. L. Lingle, 1906-1910 
J. L. Smith, 1911-1912 
N. D. Bodie, 1912-1913 
W. C. Buck, 1914-1918 
M. L. Kester, 1918-1919 
C. H. Day, 1920-1921 
C. R. Pless, 1922-1930 
W. H. Hiller, 1931-1933 
C. R. Pless, 1934-1940 
J. A. Pless, 1940- 



ST. LUKE'S, KINGS MOUNTAIN 

St. Luke's Church was located in Cleveland County about five 
miles north of Kings Mountain. 

This church was organized in 1895 by Rev. L. A. Bikle, D.D., then 
pastor of St. Matthews Church in Kings Mountain. A frame church 
was built by the congregation, and regular services were conducted. 
The congregation was placed in a parish with Kings Mountain. The 
congregation was made up of fine people, but the number was small. 
So, in 1948, most of the members transferred their membership to St. 
Matthews in Kings Mountain. The deed for their property, dated April 
15, 1895, is made to trustees of that church "So long as the said lands 
may be used or occupied for or by the Evangelical Lutheran Church." 



List of Pastors; 



Dr. L. A. Bikle, 1895-1904 
C. K. Bell, 1905-1918 
H. B. Schaeffer, 1919-1923 
A. M. Huffman, 1924-1929 



C. K. Derrick, 1930-1935 
L. B. Hamm, 1935-1940 
H. G. Fisher, 1940-1944 
W. H. Stender, 1945-1950 



ST. LUKE'S, LINCOLN CO. 

St. Luke's Lutheran Church is located in Lincoln County, ten 
miles east of Lincolnton. 

It is not known when this church was organized, but it is believed 
to have been organized by Rev. J. G. Arends while he was pastor of 
Organ Church in Rowan County 1775-1785. 



310 



History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 



The fact that Pastor Arends built his home near this church 
would seem to indicate that the church was already there when he 
moved to Lincoln County in 1785. 

This church has been known by several different names. It is 
probable that the original name was Lebanon, and it was so called by 
Rev. David Henkel and others in his day. Later on, it was called Liberty, 
which name was continued until 1858 at which time a new frame church 
was built and dedicated by the name, St. Luke's Lutheran Church. It 
has for many years been called the Ore Bank Church by the local com- 
munity because of iron deposits found in the surrounding hills and the 
forges operated there years ago. 

Some have referred to St. Luke's as the "Killian Settlement", but 
recent investigation definitely shows that the Killian Settlement or 
"Dutch Meeting House," as it was often called, was an entirely different 
church from St. Luke's at Ore Bank. St. Luke's is a mile or so north 
of the Arends home, whereas Killian Settlement is five, or so, miles 
south from the Arends home. (See Register of Deeds, Book 23, page 146.) 

The first building was of logs and most likely was built about 
the time the congregation was organized. The second and present 
church is a frame structure erected in 1857-1858 and was dedicated in 
May 1858, at which time the name was changed to St. Luke's. 

This was one of the eight or nine congregations which composed 
Pastor J. G. Arends' parish in Lincoln County. It was not a large 
church numerically, but it was served by some of the strongest minis- 
ters of the Synod. However, the church now feels the need of more 
permanent pastoral services in place of supply arrangements. 

The old home dwelling of Rev. John Gottfried Arends still stands 
about a mile south of this church. It is a two-story frame structure. 
Although showing the marks of neglect at this time, the size and design 
of the building would compare favorably with modern homes. 

List of Pastors: 

Some of the following names and dates are listed with uncertainty, 
and much of the service has been on a supply basis: 



J. G. Arends, 1785-1807 
Philip Henkel, 1808-1814 
Daniel Moser, 1815-1820 
David Henkel, 1821-1830 
Adam Miller, Jr., 1834-1845 
J. R. Peterson, 1848-1854 
A. J. Fox, 1855-1875 
J. A. Rudisill, 1883-1885 
L. L. Lohr, 1890-1894 
W. P. Cline, 1895-1897 
J. A. Arndt, 1898-1899 
J. C. Dietz, 1900-1903 



H. J. Matthias, 1903-1905 
Jacob Wike, 1907-1909 
J. F. Deal, 1910-1912 
Enoch Hite, 1915-1918 
W. J. Roof, 1918-1923 
V. C. Ridenhour, 1923-1930 
V. R. Cromer, 1930-1936 
L. A. Thomas, 1936-1945 
A. H. Keck, 1945-1948 
C. E. Bernhardt, 1948-1951 
R. B. Cuthbertson, 1951-1952 



History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 311 



ST. LUKE'S, MONROE 

St. Luke's Church in Monroe is located at 207 East Jefferson 
Street. This church was organized August 4, 1889, with thirteen charter 
members by Rev. J. F. Moser. Officers elected were A. H. Crowell, Elder; 
and C. B. Sikes and A. M. Crowell, Deacons. The church was received 
into the Tennessee Synod in November that same year. Col. A. H. 
Crowell gave a lot for a church and $1100.00 was given for a building. 
A brick church 36 x 61 with a basement was started in 1890, and was 
completed in 1892. 

On May 17, 1908 Rev. R. H. Cline, J. O. Fulenwider, Sr., and A. M. 
Crowell were elected a Building Committee to direct the construction 
of a parsonage, which was built on a lot on the west side of the church. 
This lot was given to the church May 27, 1908, by A. M. Crowell. A 
service center for soldiers at Camp Sutton was built in connection with 
St. Luke's church, during World War II, largely by the help of the 
National Lutheran Council, which was dedicated November 1, 1942, by 
Rev. Frank K. Efird, the pastor, and the President of the Synod. 

List of Pastors: 

J. F. Moser, 1889-1895 Paul L. Miller, 1921-1922 

S. S. Rahn, 1896-1897 J. E. Stockman, 1923-1926 

Student P. D. Risinger, 1897 J. D. Sheppard, 1928-1930 

Rev. P. D. Risinger, 1898 C. R. Pless, 1930-1934 

M. Q. Boland, 1902-1903 Claude V. Deal, 1934-1941 

G. D. Bernheim, Supply, Frank K. Efird, 1941-1943 

1905-1907 H. D. Hawthorne, 1943-1944 

R. H. Cline, 1907-1910 H. F. Lineberger, 1945-1949 

W. J. Boger, 1913-1918 C. E. Norman, 1949- 



ST. LUKE'S, ROWAN CO. 

St. Luke's Church is located at the village of Bear Poplar, about 
ten miles west from Salisbury in Rowan County. The church was 
tentatively organized the first Sunday in January 1869, with eight 
members enrolled, by Rev. Samuel Rothrock, then pastor of Salem 
Church. This service was conducted in a grove belonging to Mrs. 
Catharine Kistler. It was agreed, at the same meeting, to build a brick 
church, and the following were appointed as a Building Committee: 
D. M. Barrier, Alexander Brown, and W. L. Kistler. On May 9, 1871, 
the cornerstone of the church was laid by Pastor Rothrock, Rev. N. 
Aldrich, and Rev. J. G. Neiffer. The building is of solid brick 40 x 60 
feet and originally had an inclined floor. The church was completed 
without much delay and was dedicated May 12, 1872, by Pastor Roth- 
rock and Rev. J. G. Neiffer. 

In 1879, a two-story parsonage was built, about half a mile west 
of the church on land which P. M. Brown had given for that purpose. 



312 History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 

Then in 1920, a different tract of land adjoining the church lands, was 
given to the church by Hon. B. B. Miller and Mr. C. A. Brown for par- 
sonage purposes, on which the present parsonage was built the fol- 
lowing year. 

In 1930, soon after Rev. M. L. Kester became pastor, the old build- 
ing was remodeled and completely renewed, inside and out, and a 
new Educational Annex was built, all at a cost of around $18,000.00. 
The cornerstone of the renewed building was laid April 29, 1921, by 
Pastor Kester and the President of Synod. The building was rededi- 
cated December 12, 1943, by Rev. Clyde A. Misenheimer, the present 
pastor; Rev. J. L. Yost, D.D.; and the President of Synod. 

During 1951 a new Educational Building 40x80 feet was con- 
structed at a cost of $30,000.00. 

List of Pastors: 

Samuel Rothrock, 1869-1875 I. E. Long, 1912-1916 

V. R. Stickley, 1876-1882 L. A. Thomas, 1917-1920 

J. D. Shirey, 1882-1889 J. L. Yost, 1921-1923 

H. C. Haithcox, 1890 M. J. Kluttz, 1924-1927 

B. W. Cronk, 1891-1894 M. L. Kester, 1928-1931 

H. W. Jeffcoat, 1894-1900 P. G. Kinney, 1931-1935 

Student C. A. Phillips, 1900 J. A. Linn, 1936-1938 

B. S. Brown, Sr., 1900-1904 E. K. Bodie, 1939-1943 

T. C. Parker, 1905-1908 C. A. Misenheimer, 1943 
M. L. Ridenhour, 1908-1911 



ST. MARK'S, ASHEVILLE 

St. Mark's Lutheran Church is located on the corner of Chestnut 
and Liberty Streets in the ctiy of Asheville. 

This church was organized in the Y.M.C.A. auditorium of Ashe- 
ville on July 15, 1923, with 18 members by Rev. N. D. Yount, then Western 
Field Missionary of Synod. The first officers were: Dr. M. L. Stevens, 
Mr. L. E. Fisher, and Mr. L. R. Strieker. A Sunday School was organ- 
ized that same day, with Dr. L. M. Griffith, superintendent; and Mrs. 
M. L. Stevens, Sec.-Treas. 

On June 1, 1925, Rev. E. R. Lineberger became pastor and served 
the mission at Andrews one year along with Asheville. 

The church lot was purchased September 20, 1928 at a cost of 
$20,250.00 by the mission and the Synod cooperating. Plans were made 
for a brick church with full basement to cost about $20,000.00. This, 
together with the balance due on the lot, was made possible by a gift 
of $10,000.00 from the Synodical Missionary Society, a loan of $10,000.00 
from the Board of American Missions, and a $5,000.00 loan from the 
Brotherhood Loan and Gift Fund. 



History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 313 

Groundbreaking services were held October 11, 1931, in charge 
of Pastor Lineberger, assisted by Mrs. J. L. Morgan, and construction 
began on the Monday following. The cornerstone was laid on Easter 
Sunday, March 27, 1932, by President J. L. Morgan, Pastor E. R. Line- 
berger, and Rev. A. W. Lippard. The church was opened for services 
May 22, 1932, by Pastor Lineberger in charge. Dr. Morgan preached at 
the morning service, and Dr. R. L. Patterson in the afternoon. Rev. Ray 
R. Fisher was called January 1, 1937. Soon after he came Dr. and Mrs. 
M. L. Stevens gave the church a pipe organ. 

The brick parsonage by the side of the church was built in 1938- 
1939 at a cost of $6,460.00. Following the resignation of Pastor Fisher 
on November 1, 1942, Dr. John Hall supplied the church for six months. 
On March 2, 1943, Rev. J. White Iddings was called as pastor. 

The church volunteered to become self-supporting January 1, 1944, 
and by October of that year the balance of the debt was paid off. The 
church was dedicated November 4, 194.5, by President Morgan, assisted 
by Pastor Iddings, Rev. E. R. Lineberger, who preached the sermon, and 
Rev. Ray R. Fisher. 

The church parsonage was cleared of debt in 1947 and was dedicated 
July 11, 1948, at their Twenty-fifth Anniversary service, under Pastor 
B. L. Trexler's leadership. 

A large Educational Building is now under construction at the 
back of the church, which will cost about $60,000.00 when completed. 

List of Pastors: 

N. D. Yount, 1923-1925 Dr. John Hall, Supply, 1942-1943 

E. R. Lineberger, 1925-1936 J. W. Iddings, 1943-1949 

R. R. Fisher, 1937-1942 B. L. Trexler, 1949- 



ST. MARK'S, BLOWING ROCK 

St. Mark's Lutheran Church is located in Caldwell County, about 
three miles south of Blowing Rock at what was formerly called Baily's 
Camp. 

There was a small frame church called Herman's Chapel, about 
two miles southwest of this place, where Lutheran services were held 
several years ago, but it was off the main highway, and so was not 
kept up. Services were occasionally held in Blowing Rock, by Rev. J. 
L. Deaton. 

In 1918, Rev. N. D. Yount accepted a call to the Watauga Parish, 
v/hich included this field. Services were held from time to time in 
Uncle Marcus Boliek's home, just east of the present church. The 
church was organized by Pastor Yount in 1922 and was named St. 
Mark's. 



314 History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 

The lot for the church was donated by Mr. Jethro Boliek. The 
framing timber was given by Uncle Marcus Boliek and was processed 
under the direction of Rev. H. W. Jeffcoat, then pastor there. /The 
building is a frame structure, weatherboarded with chestnut bark. It 
was built in 1926, under the supervision of Student J. D. Sheppard, at 
an approximate cost of $4,000.00. The Women's Missionary Society of 
the U.L.C.A. contributed a liberal part of the cash for this building. 
Miss Cora Pearl Jeffcoat, then Parish Helper of the Watauga Mission, 
organized and developed the Sunday School here and rendered valuable 
services in carrying on the work. 

Rev. J. A. Yount served here for a number of years. Its present 
pastor is the Rev. E. F. Troutman. Up to this time this work has 
been carried on in connection with some of the other congregations of 
the Watauga Parish. 

List of Pastors: 

N. D. Yount, 1922-1923 J. A. Yount, 1926-1937 

H. W. Jeffcoat, 1923-1926 E. F. Troutman, 1938- 

Student J. D. Sheppard, 1926 



ST. MARK'S, CHARLOTTE 

St. Mark's Lutheran Church in Charlotte is located on 416 North 
Tryon Street. 

This church was organized in the County Court House in Char- 
lotte, on Monday, January 31, 1859, with sixteen members, by Rev. G. 
D. Bernheim, D.D. Dr. Bernheim had gone to Charlotte in the interest 
of North Carolina College at Mt. Pleasant, N. C, and, while on that 
mission, met a number of influential Lutherans living there, who ex- 
pressed a desire for a Lutheran Church in that city. So, arrangements 
were made for a Lutheran service in the First Presbyterian church on 
Sunday, January 30, 1859. As a result of this service, a business meet- 
ing was held on Monday evening in the Court House, January 31, 1859, 
when the church was organized with sixteen members. The name 
chosen was St. Mark's Evangelical Lutheran Church. 

Their first place of worship was in a Methodist Church on the north- 
west corner of College and Seventh Streets, which property was pur- 
chased by the Lutherans for $600.00 . . . Their second building was on 
510 North Tryon Street. This lot, with some building lumber, was 
traded to the Lutheran congregation in exchange for the old church 
which they had recently bought. 

A new church was soon built on the recently acquired lot. The 
cornerstone was laid July 8, 1870, by Rev. Nathan Aldrich, and by 



History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 315 

1872 the building was completed, and was formally opened and dedi- 
cated. This building is still standing, and is now used as an apartment 
house. 

Soon after Rev. T. Shannon Brown became pastor, a new location 
was secured on 416 North Tryon Street, and a churchly brick building 
was erected. The cornerstone was laid October 31, 1885, in charge of 
Pastor T. S. Brown. The church was paid for in about five years and 
was dedicated October 31, 1890. 

During the pastorate of Rev. J. Fielding Crigler, D.D., the church 
was enlarged and a three-story Educational Building was constructed. 
The cornerstone of the Education Building was laid March 7, 1920, by 
Pastor Crigler, the President of Synod, and Rev. W. A. Lutz. The first 
service held in the new building was in the fall of 1920. The main 
church was reopened October 1, 1922. These improvements represent 
a cost of around $75,000.00. 

At the beginning of Rev. W. B. Freed's pastorate, the old parson- 
age, by the side of the church, was torn down, and a new one secured 
in a residential part of the city; better suited to the pastor's needs. 

While Dr. R. L. Patterson was pastor of this church, preliminary 
steps were taken which led up to the organization of Holy Trinity 
Lutheran Church in that city. The charter membership of St. Luke's 
Congregation came largely from St. Mark's, while Dr. J. F. Crigler 
was pastor. 

List of Pastors: 

Alexander Phillippi, 1859-1860 W. C. Schaeffer, Asst., 

G. D. Benheim, 1861-1865 1906-1908 

N. Aldrich, 1865-1874 R. L. Patterson, 1908-1914 

A. L. Yount, Supply, 1874-1876 J. F. Crigler, 1915-1948 

E. A. Wingard, 1876-1881 G. D. Conrad, Asst. Pastor, 

T. H. Strohecker, Supply, 1939-1940 

1881-1882 D. F. Cooper, Asst. Pastor, 

T. S. Brown, 1882-1890 1941-1943 

W. S. Bowman, 1890-1897 W. B. Freed, 1948- 

C. B. King, Supply, 1897-1898 W. G. Marz, Asst. Pastor, 1952- 
R. C. Holland, 1898-1906 



ST. MARK'S, CHINA GROVE 

St. Mark's Church is located on Main Street in China Grove, Row- 
an County. In October 1887, three Lutheran girls — Ethel Patterson, 
Agnes Eddleman, and Beulah Thom — living in China Grove, asked 
Mr. J. A. Thorn to organize a Sunday School in the old school academy 
in that place. This school was continued until the church was built. 

St. Mark's was organized in the spring of 1894 by Rev. C. A. 
Marks, then pastor of Lutheran Chapel Church, near China Grove. That 
same year a lot for a church was given by Mr. I. Frank Patterson. A 



316 History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 

frame building was soon erected and was opened for services July 1, 
1894. The church was dedicated on the second Sunday in October 1896 
by Rev. J. Q. Wertz, pastor, and Rev. C. B. Miller. Transepts were added 
to the building in 1897. 

In 1902 the congregation called Rev. C. B. Miller as its first full- 
time pastor. Up to this time it had been in a parish with Lutheran 
Chapel and Center Grove. A parsonage was bought when Rev. W. B. 
Aull became pastor in 1907. 

Soon after Rev. W. H. Riser became pastor, the congregation began 
planning for a new and larger church, and the cornerstone for the 
new building was laid April 24, 1917, by Pastor Riser and Rev. C. A. 
Brown, president of Synod. The building is a brick structure with full 
basement and cost about $30,000.00. The church was completed and 
opened for services on October 28, 1917. It was dedicated May 16, 1920, 
by Pastor C. P. Fisher and the President of Synod, during the meeting 
of Synod in that church that year. 

Sunday School rooms were added in 1929, and a new parsonage 
built in 1937, during Rev. C. R. Patterson's pastorate. Rev. W. T. Nau, 
Ph.D., was pastor during the celebration of their Golden Jubilee and 
wrote a brief history of the congregation for that occation. The present 
pastor is J. L. Griffin. ' 

List of Pastors: 

C. A. Marks, 1894-1896 C. P. Fisher, 1918-1926 

J. Q. Wertz, 1896-1902 C. R. Patterson, 1926-1938 

C. B. Miller, 1902-1907 W. T. Nau, 1938-1944 

W. B. Aull, 1907-1910 J. L. Thornburg, 1945-1949 

W. H. Riser, 1911-1917 J. L. Griffin, 1950-1953 



ST. MARK'S, GROUSE 

St. Mark's Church is located in Gaston County, about two miles 
south from Crouse, and about seven miles east from Cherryville. 

The original location was about a mile east of the present church. 
The congregation went by the name of "Beaver Dam", due to the fact 
that the church was located close to Beaver Dam Creek. 

It appears that work was started here as early as 1791, which is 
evidenced from Rev. J. Gottfried Arends' Journal which says he held 
communion services here in that year. As he was then living in Lin- 
coln County, it is most likely he conducted sevices here off and on, 
for many years. In fact Beaver Dam became a part of his parish in 
course of time. It is believed that Rev. Paul Henkel also preached here 
at an early time in his ministry. Rev. David Henkel served this con- 
gregation regularly from 1814 to 1830, along with other congregations. 



History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 



317 



This congregation appears not to have owned property for the 
first while, but on March 6, 1819, a tract of land was purchased, which 
"included the meeting house and graveyard", which shows that meet- 
ings had been conducted here prior to the purchase of this land. A 
church was soon erected on this land, which was opened for a com- 
munion service October 17, 1819. Then on May 10, 1856, it was decided 
to build a new church about a mile west from the old one, for which 
land was secured. This was a frame building 35 x 45 feet in dimen- 
sions. This building was completed and dedicated May 8, 1858, and 
the name was changed from Beaver Dam to St. Mark's. Rev. J. R. 
Peterson was pastor here during that time. 

Then in August 1923 a special meeting was held by the congre- 
gation to consider remodeling the church, which resulted in a decision 
to build a new brick veneer church. The cornerstone for this building 
was laid October 26, 1924, under the pastoral leadership of Rev. C. O. 
Lippard. However, Pastor Lippard was called elsewhere before the 
building was completed, and Rev. F. M. Speagle succeeded him. 

This church is in a parish with St. Paul's and Bethel of the Grouse 
parish. The congregation has contributed commendably to the for- 
mation of new congregations in its surrounding communities — at Kings 
Mountain, Cherryville, and Grouse. 



List of Pastors: 



J. G. Arends, 1791-1803 
Paul Henkel, Supply, 1803- 
Philip Henkel, 1808-1814 
David Henkel, 1814-1830 
Adam Miller, Jr., 1835-1840 
J. R. Peterson, 1847-1865 
L. A. Fox, Supply, 1866 
A. J. Fox, 1868-1872 
M. L. Little, 1874-1888 
L. L. Lohr, 1890-1893 
J. J. George, 1893-1895 
M. L. Pence, 1897-1899 



R. H. Gline, 1900-1903 

E. H. Kohn, 1904-1909 
J. C. Dietz, 1909-1914 

O. W. Aderholdt, 1915-1920 
G. O. Lippard, 1920-1924 

F. M. Speagle, 1925-1928 
J. J. Bickley, 1928-1932 
H. P. Baringer, 1932-1940 
W. N. Yount, 1940-1942 
R. L. Fisher, 1942-1943 
L. S. Miller, 1943- 



ST. MARK'S LUTHERAN CHURCH, LUMBERTON 

A survey of this field was made by Mr. Ted Goins, a Lenoir 
Rhyne Gollege student, during the summer of 1951, under the direction 
of the Board of American Missions. Worship services were begun here 
by Mr. Goins on June 10, that year, which he continued through August. 
Students from the Southern Seminary conducted Sunday services for 
two months. 

On November 1, 1951, Rev. E. R. Lineberger, Sr., was called to 
this field as missionary developer, under the direction of the Synod and 



318 History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 

the Board of American Missions. A church was organized on June 1, 
1952, with fifty confirmed members, under the name of St. Mark's 
Lutheran Church. Pastor Lineberger was in charge of the service, and 
Dr. F. L. Conrad, President of Synod, preached the sermon for the oc- 
casion. The service was held in the chapel of the Stephens Funeral 
Home, on North Elm Street. 

A lot for a church has been purchased at a cost of $7,000 which 
is 196 X 210 feet in dimensions, and with the help of the Synod, the 
Brotherhood, and the Missionary Society of Synod, plans are in the 
making for a church building in the near future. 

List of Pastors: 
E. R. Lineberger, 1951 



ST. MARK'S, MOORESVILLE 

St. Mark's Church in Mooresville, Iredell County, N. C, is located 
on Main Street. 

The first service here, leading up to an established Lutheran 
Church, was held on Sunday, December 8, 1907, by Rev. J. L. Morgan, 
Synodical Missionary of the North Carolina Synod. The service was 
held in the A. R. P. Church. 

The congregation was organized on December 13, 1908, with 24 
members by Missionary Morgan. The officers elected were: S. F. 
Ludwig and J. M. Goodman, Elders; W. G. Goodman and W. P. Car- 
penter, Deacons; and A. L. Starr, Sec.-Treas. 

At the time the work was begun, the pastor lived in High 
Point where he was directing the establishment of a Lutheran Church. 
On October 1, 1909, he moved to Mooresville and devoted his energies 
to the mission here and at Landis. 

The church lot was purchased in 1908, by the help of the Synod, 
for $800.00. The church is a brick structure and was built by day labor 
at a cost totalling a little more than $5,000.00. The brick work was 
begun on Thursday, April 28, 1910, and the church was practically com- 
pleted in that year. 

The first service held in the new church was on January 29, 
1911. Pastor Morgan's text was Psalm 122:1. A Sunday School was 
organized on the same day with 63 members present. Dr. P. W. Trout- 
man was elected Superintendent, and Mr. Floyd Smith was chosen 
Sec.-Treas. The first communion service held in the church was on 
Palm Sunday, April 9, 1911. Pastor Morgan closed his official work 
here May 28, 1911, and on June 19 moved to Raleigh to open a new 
mission church in that city. 



History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 319 

St. Mark's was associated in a parish with St. Luke's at Bear 
Poplar for a year or two, and then with Trinity, Landis. But on 
January 1, 1921, this congregation called Rev. L. A. Thomas. 

The first parsonage was built at the rear of the church. Then, 
in 1929, this building was converted into Sunday School usages, 
and the present brick parsonage was built, under the supervision of 
Rev. C. A. Phillips, at a cost of approximately $8,000.00. 

Encouraged by a special gift from Mr. Erastus Barger, a well- 
arranged Educational Building was constructed under the pastoral super- 
vision of Rev. L. E. Blackwelder. The cornerstone was laid June 27, 
1948, in charge of the pastor, assisted by President V. R. Cromer, Dr. 
J. L. Morgan, and Rev. C. A. Phillips. 

A special service was held on November 28, 1948, celebrating the 
opening of the new building for services, and also the Fortieth Anni- 
versary of the Congregation. This service was in charge of the pastor, 
Rev. L. E. Blackwelder, with a sermon by Dr. J. L. Morgan, who spoke 
from the text Deut. 2:7. The building cost $52,000.00. Furnishing of 
the building was completed after Rev. E. L. Misenheimer became pastor. 

List of Pastors: 

J. L. Morgan, 1907-1911 C. A. Phillips, 1927-1933 

I. E. Long, 1911-1916 L. E. Blackwelder, 1933-1948 

L. A. Thomas, 1917-1922 E. L. Misenheimer, 1949-1951 

. G. H. L. Lingle, 1922-1927 L. E. Bouknight, 1952- 



ST. MARK'S, ROWAN CO. 

St. Mark's Church is located in Rowan County, about six miles 
west from Salisbury on the Mooresville highway. The church was 
first located about a mile south of the present church where the old 
graveyard is. The church was organized in 1879, with eighteen mem- 
bers, by Rev. J. C. Moser, while he was pastor at Mt. Moriah. 

The first church was a frame building 30 x 45 feet which was 
built in 1880, and was dedicated on the first Sunday in October that 
same year. In 1923 a new location was secured on the main highway, 
and a large brick church was built. The cornerstone of the build- 
ing was laid on September 30, 1923, by Pastor, Rev. J. S. Wessinger; 
Rev. W. G. Cobb and Rev. J. L. Yost. The first service held in the new 
church was on Sunday, at Thanksgiving time, in 1923 with the sermon 
by Pastor Wessinger. The church was dedicated October 11, 1931, by 
Pastor Enoch Hite, Rev. J. S. Wessinger, and the President of Synod. 



320 



History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 



From the time of its organization, this congregation had been 
in a parish with Mt. Moriah, but at the beginning of 1935, Rev. D. F. 
Swicegood became their first fulltime pastor. At the same time a new 
brick parsonage was built. 

A parish building was constructed in 1951 at a cost of $7,500.00. 



List of Pastors: 



J. C. Moser, 1879-1880 
Robert Cline, 1881-1890 
D. J. Settlemyre, 1890-1892 
J. L. Deaton, 1892-1893 
D. J. Settlemyre, 1893-1894 
J. P. Miller, 1895-1901 
J. L. Deaton, 1901-1903 
D. I. Offman, 1903-1912 
C. H. Pence, 1912-1914 
J. S. Wessinger, 1914-1928 



Enoch Hite, 1928-1931 
Stu. O. G. Swicegood, 1931 
E. R. Trexler, 1931-1934 
Dermont F. Swicegood, 

1935-1938 
Wade D. Yount, 1938-1940 
W. B. Aull, Supply, 1940 
J. S. Wessinger, 1940-1947 
W. David Wise, 1948-1950 
J. A. Seaboch, 1950- 



ST. MARTIN'S, CABARRUS CO. 

St. Martin's Lutheran Church is located in Cabarrus County, 
about eight miles southeast from Concord. 

It is not known when this church was first started. Rev. A. N. 
Marcard, while pastor of St. John's Church, Cabarrus County, 1797-1800, 
made repeated pastoral visits to the church at "Rake River (Rocky 
River)" and baptized quite a number of children and then recorded 
their names and baptismal records in the St. John's Church Record 
Book. This Rake River Church was undoubtedly St. Martin's as we 
know it now. The first baptism thus recorded by Pastor Marcard "In 
the church at Rake River" was for Henry Hegler, son of Philip Hegler 
and his wife, Magdalene Hegler, born August 24, 1797, and baptized 
December 31, 1797. Other baptisms are recorded, which show that a 
church was located here as far back at 1797. However, it appears that 
the church did not have a regular pastor for a number of years. 

On November 16, 1819, one hundred and twenty acres of land were 
granted by Governor Branch of North Carolina to John H. Bost and 
Daniel Boger, Trustees for St. Martin's Lutheran Church. (See Register 
of Deeds, Book 44, page 509.) 

Their first church of which we have any record was a log build- 
ing which stood on the east side of the road, a little north from the 
present building. A second frame church was built after a number 
of years, which is still in use by the congregation. We do not know 
when it was built, but it was remodeled in 1938, under the leadership 
of Rev. J. C. Dietz, D.D. A basement was excavated, a new roof put on, 
the entire building brick veneered, and the interior completely renewed. 



History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 



321 



Also new pews and other furniture were installed. The building and its 
furnishings were dedicated June 4, 1939, by Pastor Dietz, Rev. W. J. 
Boger, D.D., and the President of Synod. This was the home church of 
Dr. Boger. 

A new brick parsonage was built near the church in 1950. 

We do not find any records of the first pastors, except Rev. 
David Henkel and Rev. Adam Miller who visited the congregation on June 
8, 1821, and held a communion service, when forty-six members com- 
muned. Their first regular pastor was Rev. A. J. Fox, M.D. The 
present pastor is Rev. Luther Sloop. 



List of Pastors: 



A. N. Marcard, Supply, 

1797-1800 
David Henkel and 
Adam Miller, Sr., 1821 
A. J. Fox, 1838-1841 
C. G. Reitzel, 1843-1846 
J. R. Moser, 1847 
Timothy Moser, 1848-1887 
Henry Goodman, 1887 
J. P. Price, 1888-1901 
W. H. Little, 1901 
J. F. Deal, 1902-1905 



H. L. Seagle, 1907 

L. D. Miller, 1909-1917 

. D. L. Miller, 1919-1921 
E. K. Counts, 1922-1925 
H. W. Jeffcoat, 1926-1929 

. James E. Walker, 1930-1935 
J. C. Dietz, 1936-1942 

. W. H. Dutton, 1943-1947 
J. S. Wessinger, 1947-1949 
C. K. Rhodes, Supply, 1950 
Luther R. Sloop, 1950- 



ST. MARTIN'S, MAIDEN 

St. Martin's Church is located in the town of Maiden, in Catawba 
County. The church was organized November 26, 1893, by Rev. W. P. 
Cline, with thirty-tw^o charter members. Officers elected were: J. F. 
Rabb and M. R. Bost, Elders; and R. A. Rudisill and L. E. Rabb, Dea- 
cons. At first, services were held in the old Schrum School House, 
but later in neighboring churches. 

Work was started on the church building in 1894 and was com- 
pleted in 1895 at a cost of $7,000.00. The church was dedicated in 
1896 by Pastor Cline and Dr. R. A. Yoder. A building was purchased 
in 1912 for a parsonage, then in 1919 a lot for a parsonage by the side 
of the church was bought, and a building erected at a cost of $5,000.00. 
Work was begun on a new Educational Building in November, 1925, 
under Rev. C. R. Patterson's leadership, which was completed in 
1926 at a cost of $7,500.00. The main church was remodeled and a 
tower erected in 1940, and in 1943 new pews and chancel furniture 
were installed. 

St. Martin's congregation went on a self-sustaining basis in 
1947, under the leadership of Rev. J. E. Walker. 



322 History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 



List of Pastors: 

W. P. Cline, 1893-1898 W, D. Wise, 1918-1921 

R. A. Yoder, 1898-1900, C. R. Patterson, 1922-1926 

1901-1905 . J. L. Norris, 1927-1937 
J. L. Cromer, 1900-1901, A. W. Lippard, 1938-1942 

1905-1913 James E. Walker, 1942-1951 

F. M. Speagle, 1914-1917 . Corley Lineberger, 1951- 



ST. MARTIN'S, STANLY COUNTY 

St. Martin's Church is located in Stanly County, about halfway 
between Albemarle and Oakboro. Records show that Rev. David Henkel 
held services for the "Group in Montgomery County," (this was Mont- 
gomery County then) in the year 1822 in Jacob Eflrd's home and ad- 
ministered communion to thirty members. It is believed that Pastor 
Henkel organized the congregation at that time. The name, St. Mar- 
tin, was chosen in 1828. The first church was built of logs, with a 
balcony and a high pulpit. This building was later removed and re- 
constructed for a barn on Mr. Arthur Efird's farm. 

The second church was a frame building, erected about 1860. 
It had two doors in the front, each leading into an aisle. At first, 
the pulpit was placed between the two doors, but was later moved 
to the other end of the building, and the pews were reversed. 

Agreeable to all concerned, St. Martin's, in 1902, was transferred 
from the Tennessee Synod to the North Carolina Synod. Rev. H. M. 
Brown was called as pastor, and in 1908 a new brick church was built. 
This building was completed in a short time and was dedicated by 
Pastor Brown and others. 

Their new Educational Building was constructed in 1949 while 
Rev. J. S. Wessinger was pastor. Their first parsonage was located 
about a mile west from the church. It was built about 1898 while Rev. 
J. P. Price was pastor. It was destroyed by fire October 16, 1911, but 
was soon rebuilt. Then in 1914 this building was sold and a new 
parsonage was built near the church. This building was completely 
renovated in 1951. 

List of Pastors: 

David Henkel, Occasional Vacant, 1863-1865 

Supply, 1820-1828 D. S. Henkel, 1865-1867 

Henry Goodman and Nehemiah Timothy Moser, 1867-1888 

Bonham, Occasional Supply, J. P. Price, 1888-1900 

1831-1832 W. H. Little, 1901 

Nehemiah Bonham and Adam H. M. Brown, 1902-1912 

Miller, Occasional Supply, J. A. L. Miller, 1914-1919 

1832-1838 B. S. Brown, Sr., 1920-1921 



History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 



323 



A. J. Fox, 1838-1842 
J. W. Hull, 1842-1847 
Adam Efird, 1848-1850 
Daniel Efird, 1850-1854 
C. Moretz, Jr., 1855 
Timothy Moser, 1846-1859 
E. E. Smyer, 1860-1863 



E. K. Counts, 1922-1925 
H. W. Jeffcoat, 1926-1929 
James E. Walker, 1930-1935 
J. C. Dietz, 1936-1942 
W. H. Button, 1943-1947 
J. S. Wessinger, 1947-1950 
J. E. Smith, 1951-1952 
B. D. Castor. 1953- 



ST. MATTHEWS, CALDWELL CO. 

St. Matthews Church is located five miles east from Granite Falls 
in Caldwell County. It was organized September 18, 1911, at the home 
of Catherine and Barbara Clay, near the present church location, with 
fifteen members by Rev. A. L. Boliek. Mr. and Mrs. D. M. Henkel gave 
a deed for a church lot at that same time. For some time services 
were held in the Sherrill School House near the present church. 

The church is a frame structure and was built in 1912-1913. It 
was dedicated May 11, 1918, by Rev. A. L. Boliek; Dr. A. R. Beck, who 
preached the sermon; and Pastor W. A. Deaton. The building has 
recently been greatly improved and redecorated. 



List of Pastors: 



A. L. Boliek, 1911-1916 
W. A. Deaton, 1917-1919 
F. L. Conrad, 1919-1921 
J. J. Bickley, 1922-1925 
P. C. Sigmon, 1925-1929 



C. O. Lippard, 1930-1932 
R. M. Carpenter, 1932-1943 
R. B. Sigmon, 1943-1949 
J. K. Cobb, 1949-1950 
R. M. Carpenter, Sup., 1950- 



ST. MATTHEW'S, DAVIE CO. 

St. Matthew's Church is located in Davie County, six miles south 
of Mocksville. The church was organized in 1839 by Rev. Benjamin 
Arey. The number of members is not given, but a petition from 
the church to Synod the next year was signed by forty-three mem- 
bers. The church was received by Synod in 1840. 

Their first church was a log building 36 x 50 feet, which was 
probably built about 1840; however, it was not dedicated until 1882 
by Rev. H. M. Brown, pastor. The building was enlarged while Rev. R. L. 
Brown was pastor. The present building appears to be a frame struc- 
ture, or else the old building has been weatherboarded and ceiled. 



324 



History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 



List of Pastors: 



Benjamin Arey, 1840-1845 
J. Crim, 1845-1861 
W. Kimball, 1861-1866 
W. R. Ketchie, 1866-1882 
H. M. Brown, 1882-1886 
R. L. Brown, 1888-1892 
E. P. Parker, 1892-1893 
H. E. H. Sloop, 1894-1896 
W. Kimball, 1896-1898 
B. S. Brown, Sup., 1898-1899 
R. A. Helms, 1899-1902 
L. P. Boland, 1904-1908 



T. C. Parker, 1908-1913 

V. R. Stickley, 1915-1920 

E. F, Troutman, 1926-1929 

C. F. Kyles, 1929-1932 

R. H. Kepley, 1932-1935 

O. G. Swicegood, 1935-1937 

H. A. Kistler, 1937-1938 

C. A. Misenheimer, 1938-1939 

J. D. Stoner, 1939-1944 

L. R. Sloop, 1948-1950 

J. J. Smith, 1951- 



ST. MATTHEW'S CHURCH, KINGS MOUNTAIN 

St. Matthew's Lutheran Church in Kings Mountain is located 
on the corner of Piedmont and Ridge Streets. This church was organ- 
ized in 1876 with thirteen charter members, by Rev. J. R. Peterson. 
The service was held in a school building on the corner of Piedmont 
and King Streets, where the Jacob S. Mauney Memorial Library Building 
now stands. Most of the members came from St. Mark's Church in 
Gaston County. 

During 1878-1879 the first unit of the church plant was con- 
structed. The cornerstone of the building was laid September 7, 
1878, by Pastor Peterson. The building was completed in 1879, and 
was dedicated by Rev. A. J. Fox and Rev. M. L. Little. Services were 
held in a school building, where the central school is now located, 
until the church was ready for occupancy. 

In 1904, the congregation remodeled the old building, by con- 
structing a chancel and a vestry room, and by adding Sunday School 
rooms. This was done while the congregation was without a regular 
pastor, however Student John D. Mauney, a son of the congregation, 
supplied the church during that time. The remodeled church was dedi- 
cated September 3, 1905, by Rev. J. C. Moser, D.D. In 1906 four other 
class rooms were added. 

Dr. C. K. Bell resigned as pastor in 1918, and was succeeded by 
Dr. H. B. Schaeffer in 1919. On April 4, 1921, the cornerstone was laid 
for a new Educational Building, in charge of Pastor Schaeffer, with 
Dr. R. B. Peery preaching the sermon. This building was completed 
and opened for services on November 13, 1921, with the sermon by 
Dr. C. K. Bell. 

The remodeled church was rededicated on Sunday, June 10, 1923, 
by Pastor Schaeffer and Rev. J. D. Mauney, and the new Educational 



History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 325 

Building was consecrated on the following Sunday, by Dr. Schaeffer 
and the President of Synod, who preached the sermon. Other units 
were added to the Sunday School department a few years later. 

During the services of their Fiftieth Anniversary Celebration, 
held on June 21, 1925, four surviving charter members of the congre- 
gation announced that provision had been made in their respective 
wills for a combined bequest of $37,000.00 for a new church. 

St. Luke's Church, which was organized in 1895 by Dr. L. A. 
Blkle, then pastor of St. Matthew's Church, decided in 1950 to disband, 
and many of their members moved their membership to St. Matthew's. 
Then, in 1951, a number of St. Matthew's members helped to organize 
a new church in a suburban section of the city, under the name of 
Resurrection Lutheran Church. 

About the time the present pastor, Dr. W. P. Gerberding, came to 
this parish, a new brick parsonage was constructed, in place of the 
old frame structure, and was occupied in October of 1951. 

Soon after Dr. Gerberding became pastor of St. Matthew's, the 
congregation decided to build a new $200,000.00 church. The last ser- 
vice in the old building was held October 26, 1952. 

List of Pastors: 

J. R. Peterson, 1876-1879 A. M. Huffman, 1924-1929 

N. Aldrich, 1880 C. K. Derrick, 1930-1935 

W. P. Cline, Supply, 1880-1881 L. Boyd Hamm, 1935-1940 

J. B. Fox, 1881-1883 H. G. Fisher, 1940-1944 

A. J. Fox, 1884 W. H. Stender, 1945-1950 

L. A. Bikle, 1884-1904 Student Raymond Bost and 

C. K. Bell, 1905-1918 W. T. Nau, Supply, 1951 

H. B. Schaeffer, 1919-1923 W. P. Gerberding, 1951- 



ST. MATTHEW'S, ROWAN CO. 

St. Matthew's Church is located in Rowan County, ten miles 
east from Salisbury on the Bringle Ferry Road. This church was 
organized on Sunday, April 15, 1838, by Rev. Benjamin Arey, who at 
that time was pastor of several churches in Davidson County. Rev. 
Arey visited this community and held a communion service, when 
thirty-three communed, on March 1, 1838. Then, on March 3rd, he 
confirmed a class of twenty-five. Meanwhile, twenty young people from 
the community attended catechetical instruction for two weeks at 
Organ Church by Rev. Henry Graeber, pastor of Organ congregation 
and were afterwards confirmed as members of St. Matthew's Church. 

We do not have a charter membership list; however, it is most 
likely that the congregation was at first made up of those listed at 
the communion service on March 1 and the class confirmed on March 3, 



326 History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 

together with the group that was catechised by Pastor Graeber. The 
first baptismal record is for Michael Bame, son of Samuel and Anna 
Bame which was administered in a barn on April 16, 1838, by Rev. 
Mr. Arey. 

For several years before a church was built, the congregation 
worshiped at different places — sometimes in Abram Hill's barn, half 
a mile east of where the church now is; at other times under a walnut 
tree in Mr. Hill's yard, and at other times at Rufty's mill near where 
the bridge now is on Second Creek. Finally, on February 21, 1845, 
John and Anna Wilhelm sold to the church three acres of land for 
$10.00 for church purposes; hence, the church was for many years 
called Wilhelm's Church. 

The first house of worship built on this lot was a frame struc- 
ture with a gallery on three sides and a high pulpit in the north 
end. It stood across the road in what is now a part of the graveyard. 
This church was dedicated on July 27, 1845, by Rev. J. D. Scheck, 
Rev. S. Rothrock, D.D., and Rev. Benjamin Arey. Rev. Joseph A. Linn, 
then pastor of this church, was ordained at the same service. St. 
Matthews was then in a parish with St. Paul's and Luther's Church. 

On April 12, 1882, the cornerstone was laid by Rev. Samuel Roth- 
rock and their pastor. Rev. H. T. Strohecker. This is a frame structure, 
originally 40 x 60 feet, but in 1924 transepts were added while Rev. 
Clark was pastor. A tower was built in 1910, Rev. W. C. Buck being 
pastor. 

Two Sunday School wings were constructed in 1951, under Rev. 
D. F. Johnson's leadership, and the interior of the church refinished. 
Their first parsonage was built in 1889, about a mile west of the 
church. The new one was built in 1934, near the church. 

This was the home church of Rev. J. L. Morgan, first fulltime 
President of the Synod, of Rev. P. J. Bame, Rev. John L. Morgan, Rev, 
J. D. Stoner, and Rev. W. G. Boggs 

This congregation has been connected with different churches 
in parish relationships, but was with St. Peter's church longer than with 
any other one. Then, in 1947, each of these churches mutually agreed 
to call and support a full time pastor. Rev. D. F. Johnson was then 
called as full time pastor of St. Mattew's. 

List of Pastors: 

Benjamin Arey, 1838-1841 W. P. Huddle, 1893-1896 

J. D. Scheck, 1841-1843 W. B. Oney, 1897-1898 

Joseph A. Linn, Sr., 1844-1864 E. W. Leslie, 1899-1902 
William Artz, 1864 . F. M. Harr, 1903-1905 

. Whitson Kimball, C. Diefendorf, 1905-1907 

1864-1865 C. K. Helland, 1908-1909 

L. C. Groseclose, 1866 W. C. Buck, 1910-1913 

Samuel Rothrock, 1867 H. A. Trexler, 1914-1920 

Whitson Kimball, 1868 G. H. Cooper, 1920-1923 



History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 



327 



R. L. Brown, 1869-1875 
W. H. Cone, 1875-1877 
J. A. Linn, Jr., 1877-1880 
T. H. Strohecker, 

1881-1885 
H. A. Trexler, 1886-1892 



B. M. Clark, 1923-1928 
A. K. Hewitt, 1928-1932 
F. P. Cauble, 1932-1938 
Olin Swicegood, 1938-1947 
D. F. Johnson, 1947-1952 
. R. F. Ludwig, 1952- 



ST. MATTHEW'S, WILMINGTON 

St. Matthew's Church is located on the corner of Seventeenth 
and Ann Streets in Wilmington. However, it was first located at 
919 North Fourth Street, in a section of the city called Brooklyn. 

This work was started when, in 1890, some of the members of 
St. Paul's Church, under the leadership of their pastor, Rev. F. W. E. 
Peschau, opened a Sunday School in a hall in that vicinity. A lot 
was purchased and a building 55 x 30 feet was soon constructed 
for the use of the new group. The cornerstone was laid March 30, 
1891, by Pastor Peschau and Dr. G. H. Cox, president of Synod. 

On March 21, 1892, the church was organized with ten members 
by Dr. Peschau, and Rev. G. D. Bernheim, D.D., was called as pastor. 
The newly constructed building, on which there was a debt of $1500.00, 
was transferred to the new congregation. The debt was paid off 
over a period of years. Mrs. G. D. Bernheim, the pastor's wife, per- 
sonally gave liberally to this cause. The church was dedicated, 
free of debt, April 29, 1906, by Pastor C. R. W. Kegley and Rev. W. A. 
Snider, pastor of St. Paul's Church. In 1909 a Sunday School annex 
was added to the building. 

In 1922, while Rev. B. E. Petrea was pastor, a lot was purchased 
on the corner of Seventeenth and Dock Streets, on which the congrega- 
tion planned to relocate its church. Then, in 1925, another adjoining 
lot was purchased. On January 12, 1941, fire damaged their church 
building, so it was decided to build a new church. Another lot was 
purchased on the corner of Seventeenth and Ann Streets, and soon a 
new brick church was constructed. 

The new church was completed in record time, and was opened 
for worship services on February 22, 1942. The cornerstone was for- 
mally laid on that same afternoon, by their pastor, the Rev. Carl H. 
Fisher, followed by greetings from Dr. E. F. Keever, Rev. Geo. S. 
Bowden, and Rev. W. B. Freed. 

The church was dedicated, free of all indebtedness, on February 
25, 1945, by President J. L. Morgan, assisted by Pastor Fisher, and 
the following ministers: Dr. G. W. McClanahan, Dr. B. E. Petrea, Rev. 
E. K. Bodie — all three former pastors of this church — Dr. E. F. Keever, 
and Dr. W. B. Freed. 

Back in 1905, a parsonage was built by one side of the old 
church, on Fourth Street, but, when it was decided to move, a house 



328 



History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 



for a parsonage was purchased near the new location of the church. 
After Rev. K. Y. Huddle became pastor in 1946, a house and lot were 
purchased on 17th Street, for a parsonage just across from the church. 



List of Pastors: 



G. D. Bernheim, 1892,1901 
C. R. W. Kegley, 1901-1907 
G. S. Bearden, 1908-1909 
H. E. Beatty, 1910-1912 
G. W. McClanahan, 1913-1921 



B. E. Petrea, 1921-1928 
E. F. K. Roof, 1928- 1929 
E. K. Bodie, 1930-1939 
Carl H. Fisher, 1939-1946 
K. Y. Huddle, 1946- 



ST. PAUL'S, ALAMANCE CO. 

St. Paul's Church is located in Alamance County on the old 
Trading Path, about two and one-half miles east of the Alamance 
Battle Grounds. It is not definitely known when this church was 
organized; however, it must have been about the same time that 
Lows and Frieden's were started. Dr. R. D. W. Connor says in his three- 
volume history of North Carolina that there were Lutheran churches 
on Haw River in 1745, but whether this was one of them, we cannot 
tell. Prof. J. B. Robertson, who was a son of Low's church, says it 
was organized not later than 1773 or maybe earlier. History spoke of 
itinerant ministers preaching here as early as 1759 and on to 1764. 
This seems to have been a union church with the German Reformed 
to about 1800, when the Reformed brethren withdrew and built a church 
of their own, while the Lutherans remained on the original grounds. 
The first two buildings were log structures; however, we do not know 
much about either of them. The third and present building is a 
frame church, about 30 x 40, which was erected about 1893. Sunday 
School rooms were added in 1941 while Rev. D. I. Offman was pastor. 
During the pastorate of Rev. P. G. Kinney a parsonage was acquired. 



List of Pastors: 



A. Nussmann, 1774-1789 
J. G. Arends, 1775-1789 

C. E. Bernhardt, 1789-1800 
Philip Henkel, 1800-1805 
L. Markert, 1805-1810 
Jacob Scherer, 1810-1828 

D. J. Hauer, 1828-1829 
William Artz, 1830-1852 

J. Greeson, Asst., 1834-1839 

S. Scherer, 1854-1858 

J. D. Scheck, 1859-1864 

L. Groseclose, Supply, 1865-1866 

S. Rothrock, Supply, 1867-1868 

C. H. Bernheim, 1868-1872 



S. Scherer, 1873-1876 
W. Kimball, 1877-1880 
J. L. Buck, 1881-1888 
C. B. Miller, 1890-1893 
H. M. Brown, 1894-1902 
R. R. Sowers, 1903-1905 

C. M. Fox, 1906-1907 

V. R. Stickley, 1909-1912 
H. W. Jeff coat, 1914-1922 

D. I. Offman, 1922-1946 
C. Lee Shipton, Supply, 

1948-1949 
P. G. Kinney, 1949- 



History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 329 



ST. PAUL'S, CATAWBA CO. 

St. Paul's Church is located in Catawba County, about two miles 
west from Newton. It was at first called the "Dutch Meeting House," 
while Rev. Arends referred to it as the "South Fork Church." 

This is one of the oldest churches in Catawba County. The 
deed for their land was made May 20, 1771; however, there is reason 
to believe the church was started a few years before land was pur- 
chased, possibly about 1768. The property was jointly owned by Luth- 
erans and German Reformed. 

The first house of worship was a small log building, and stood 
where a part of the graveyard is now. The second building, which 
is the present one, was built about 1808. The walls of this building 
are of large hewn logs, weatherboarded on the outside and ceiled inside. 
Some of the timbers of the old building were used in this one. Home- 
made nails were used in its structure. This building has a gallery, 
which originally was used by colored people. The building is rec- 
tangular in shape, with a door in each end and on one side. There 
was, at first, a high goblet-shaped pulpit, which was later replaced 
by a more modern one. 

The first services conducted here were by visiting ministers, or 
by one or more of their laymen. Rev. Adolphus Nussman probably 
visited and ministered to these people soon after he came to America. 

However, J. G. Arends is generally regarded as the first pastor 
of this congregation. He, like Pastor Nussman, first lived in Rowan 
County, but in 1785 moved to Lincoln County, and served all the Luth- 
eran churches West of the Catawba River. 

St. Paul's Church originally belonged to the North Carolina 
Synod, and may have taken part in the organization of that Synod 
in 1803. Then, after the Tennessee Synod was organized in 1820, a 
part of the congregation left the North Carolina Synod and united 
with the Tennessee Synod. In 1846, or possibly a little later, a part 
of the congregation withdrew from the Tennessee Synod and united 
with the newly organized body, called the Tennessee Synod Reorganized, 
under the leadership of Rev. Adam Miller, Jr., but later united with 
the Joint Synod of Ohio. 

It should be noted here, that a part of the original St. Paul's 
Congregation remained associated with the North Carolina Synod, 
up to and beyond this time. In fact, the North Carolina Synod 
held its annual convention of Synod in St. Paul's Church in 1848. 
Now, when we remember that the Reformed congregation also shared 
in the ownership of the church property, and worshiped at stated 
times, in the same building, we need not wonder, if confusion existed. 

In 1905, the Tennessee Synod Congregation built a house of 
worship of its own, at Startown, some two miles away, and relocated 
there. The name, St. Paul's Church, is retained, and the congregation 



330 History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 

is a continuation of the church at the old location, connected with the 
Tennessee Synod. Meanwhile, the group that adhered to the North 
Carolina Synod continued in that relationship for a while, but later 
on discontinued as a separate congregation, and its members united 
with other Lutheran congregations in the surrounding community. 

In course of time the Reformed brethren also withdrew and built 
a house of worship of their own which leaves Old St. Paul's in the 
hands of the American Lutheran Church, which is the successor of 
the Joint Synod of Ohio in that locality. The congregation is now 
erecting a new house of worship near the old building. 

We are not sure of either the names or the dates of service of 
pastors for this congregation. However, it is believed that, up to the 
time the Tennessee Synod withdrew from that location, the following 
brethren served there: 

List of Pastors: 

J. G. Arends, 1785-1807 P. C. Henkel, 1849-1869 

Philip Henkel, 1805-1807 J. M. Smith, 1870-1894 

Philip Henkel, 1808-1814 J. A. Rudisill, 1895 

Daniel Moser, 1815-1820 J. C. Moser, 1896-1897 

David Henkel, 1820-1831 R. L. Fritz, 1897 

Adam Miller, Jr., S., 1832 E. J. Sox, 1897-1899 

Adam Miller, Jr., 1835-1846 F. K. Roof, 1900-1905 
J. R. Moser ) 
C. G. Reitzel l S., 1847-1848 
P. C. Henkel \ 



ST. PAUL'S, GROUSE 

St. Paul's Church is located in Lincoln County in the town 
of Crouse, N. C. 

Judging from old land grants and by family traditions, German 
Lutheran families settled in this section long years ago. 

For some time an old log school house, about a mile north 
from where Crouse now is, was used for occasional preaching services. 
Then, in the course of time, a small frame church 20x40 feet weather- 
boarded and ceiled, with boards set vertically, was built. This church 
was near the old school house and was called Ebenezer. Services 
were held here by different ministers among whom were Rev. Adam 
Miller, Jr., Rev. Geo. L. Hunt, and Rev. M. L. Carpenter. But it was 
found difficult to maintain regular services, as a number of the families 
had moved into other communities. 

In the meantime. Rev. R. H. Cline, then pastor of St. Mark's 
Church a few miles away, began holding services in a school house 



History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 331 

in Grouse in 1902, where a congregation was soon organized and a frame 
church built. This church was named St. Paul's and may be regarded 
as the successor or continuation of the old Ebenezer Church. 

St. Paul's Church was received into the Tennessee Synod in 
1904. For a number of years, it was in a parish of four churches 
in that area. It is now with Bethel and St. Marks, with the parsonage 
at Crouse. 

On Sunday, April 28, 1946, the church was completely destroyed 
by fire. But, the congregation, under the leadership of Pastor L. Sum- 
mie Miller, went right to work to build a new church. It was unani- 
mously agreed to build on the main highway, by the side of the 
new parsonage. Ground was broken on March 1, 1949, by Pastor Miller, 
and on Sunday, November 19, 1949, the new church was opened for 
divine services by the pastor. This is a splendid building, the cost of 
which was about $35,000.00. 

A new parsonage was built by the Crouse Parish in 1938, while 
Rev. H. P. Barringer was pastor. 

List of Pastors: 
Ebenezer 
Adam Miller, Occasionally, B. L. Westenberger, 1891-1895 

1835-1853 J. H. Wannemacher, 1895-1899 

G. L. Hunt, 1853-1877 George Derhammer, 1900-1902 

M. L. Carpenter, 1877-1891 

St. Paul's 
R. H. Cline, Supply, 1902-1903 J. J. Bickley, 1928-1932 

E. H. Kohn, 1904-1909 H. P. Barringer, 1932-1940 
J. C. Dietz, 1909-1915 W. N. Yount, 1940-1942 
O. W. Aderholdt, 1916-1920 R. L. Fisher, 1942-1943 

C. O. Lippard, 1920-1924 L. S. Miller, 1943- 

F. M. Speagle, 1925-1928 



ST. PAUL'S, DURHAM 

St. Paul's Lutheran Church in Durham is located on Chapel Hill 
Street and Yates Avenue. 

This field was for a while included in the Synodical Missionary 
territory covered by Rev. J. L. Morgan, who was at that time located 
in Raleigh. When Pastor Morgan left Raleigh in 1919, to become 
Prsident of Synod, Rev. A. M. Huffman succeeded him in the work at 
Raleigh and Durham. 

The church in Durham was organized in the Y.M.C.A. rooms on 
March 4, 1923, by Pastor Huffman, with twelve members. About June 
1, 1924, Rev. J. Lewis Thornburg became the first regular pastor of 



332 History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 

this church. Under his direction the lot, with two dwelling houses, 
at Chapel Hill Street and Yates Avenue, was purchased for $20,000.00. 

The house on the rear of the lot was soon dismantled to make 
room for the first unit of their church, which was begun in 1928. 
The cornerstone was laid February 17, 1929, by the President of Synod 
and Pastor Thornburg. The church was completed, and on April 14, 
1929, was opened for divine services. The sermon for this occasion was 
delivered by Rev. A. D. R. Hancher, D.D., of the Board of American 
Missions. President Morgan and Pastor Thornburg had charge of the 
services. 

This church is constructed of stone, like that used at Duke Uni- 
versity, Gothic architecture, and has a basement for educational pur- 
poses. The cost of the building and equipment, not counting the lot, 
was about $30,000.00. 

The two-story house on the front end of the lot was for a while 
used as a parsonage, but it was later torn down and parts of it used 
in constructing a new parsonage on the same ground at a cost of 
$3,000.00. The front end of the lot was then leased for a filling 
station, to provide revenue for the church debt. After the debt had 
been reduced to around $8,600.00, a loan was secured from the Board 
of American Missions by which the commercial loan was paid off. 

The congregation assumed self-support January 1, 1943, and in 
1944 special efforts were made, with the help of Synod, the Missionary 
Society, the Brotherhood, and the Luther League, to pay off the remain- 
ing debt. 

The church was dedicated, free of debt, December 31, 1944, by the 
President of Synod; the Pastor, Rev. H. A. Schroder; and Rev. J. 
Lewis Thornburg. 

St. Paul's has all the while kept open house for Lutheran stu- 
dents at Duke University. Also, for about fifteen years, her pastor 
conducted services for Lutheran Students in the State University at 
Chapel Hill. During World War U St. Paul's was host to thousands 
of servicemen from Camp Butner. 

In 1950 a new parsonage was purchased, some distance from 
the church, and the old one was converted into a Parish House, to 
meet the Sunday school and social needs of the congregation. 

List of Pastors: 

A. M. Huffman, 1923- P. C Sigmon, 1930-1931 

J. L. Thornburg, 1924-1930 H. A. Schroder, 1931- 



ST. PAUL'S, HAMLET 

St. Paul's Lutheran Church is located on the corner of Marlboro 
and Bauersfeld Streets in Hamlet, Richmond County, N. C. 

This field was surveyed by Rev. C. V. Deal, then pastor at Mon- 
roe, N. C, and the first service was held by him on March 9, 1941. 



History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 333 

Rev. Frank K. Eflrd succeeded Pastor Deal at Monroe, June 1, 
1941, and continued services at Hamlet. The work was approved by 
the Board of American Missions. 

The church was organized on Sunday afternoon, December 14, 
1941, with 53 members by Pastor Eflrd, assisted by President Morgan. 
This service was held in the Presbyterian Church. 

A lot 200x200 feet on Marlboro Street was purchased at a 
price of $1,500.00 on a fifty-flfty basis by the congregation and the 
Synod. 

On July 1, 1942, Rev. Roscoe B. Fisher was called as pastor, 
and immediately plans for a new church were worked out. Groundbreak- 
ing services were held November 16, 1942, and the building was com- 
pleted by May 14, 1943, at a cost of over $21,500.00. Formal opening ser- 
vices were held and the cornerstone laid on Sunday, July 25, 1943, 
under the direction of Pastor R. B. Fisher, assisted by President J. L. 
Morgan, Dr. C. L. Miller, Rev. Walter N. Yount, and Mr. H. E. Isenhour. 

Rev. Mr. Fisher resigned this field in order to accept a call to 
St. Stephen's Church in Lenoir, N. C, in 1944, and Rev. R. B. Cuthbert- 
son was called May 21, that year to the work at Hamlet. Soon after 
Pastor Cuthbertson came the remaining debt was paid, and the church 
was dedicated December 17, 1944, by Pastor Cuthbertson and the Presi- 
dent of Synod. 

Rev. Cuthbertson resigned during the spring of 1948, in order 
to take charge of a new mission at New Bern, N. C, and Rev. Marion 
Starr was called to St. Paul's, Hamlet, April 1, 1948. 

About the time the church was being built, the congregation pur- 
chased a house and lot, across the street from the church, for a par- 
sonage. This church assumed self support on January 1, 1951. 

List of Pastors: 

C. V. Deal, 1941 R. B. Cuthbertson, 1944-1948 

F. K. Eflrd, 1941-1942 C. M. Starr, 1948-1952 

R. B. Fisher, 1942-1944 



ST. PAUL'S. ROWAN CO. 

St. Paul's Church is located in Rowan County, flve miles south 
of Salisbury just off the old Concord road. The church was organized 
with seventeen members on March 30, 1830, by Rev. John Lentz, as a 
part of a union church where different denominations worshiped at 
different times. 

The land for the church was given by Andrew Holshouser, hence 
the name "Holshouser's Church," as it was first called. The first church 
was a frame structure and erected about the same time the organiza- 



334 



History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 



tion was started. St. Paul's congregation was in a parish with Lutheran 
Chapel at China Grove from 1855 to 1882, with the pastor located at 
the latter place. 

By 1866 the union arrangement of property ownership had been 
discontinued, and each denomination had its own house of worship; 
the Lutherans retaining the old property. A new brick church was 
started in 1868, and was completed in 1872. On June 1, 1872, the 
church was reorganized, following the completion of their new house of 
worship.. On July 21, 1872, the church was dedicated by their pastor, 
Rev. Whitson Kimball. A Sunday School was organized in 1873. In 
1882 St. Paul's was in a parish with Bethel congregation, and the two 
congregations purchased a parsonage at Franklin, while Rev. C. A. 
Rose was pastor. 

The church was enlarged in 1893 and was rededicated the next 
year by Pastor Rose and Dr. G. H. Cox. The parsonage was located at 
St. Paul's in 1916, being the larger congregation. In 1924, while Rev. 
C. E. Ridenhour was pastor, work was started on a new brick church, 
the cornerstone of which was laid September 24, 1924, by Pastor Riden- 
hour, Dr. G. H. Cox and the President of Synod. The building was 
completed in 1926, and the opening service was held on June 6 that 
year. The parsonage was completely destroyed by fire June 28, 1934, 
but was rebuilt of brick, nearer the church. 

Their new church was dedicated, free of debt, on Sunday, May 30, 
1937, by their Pastor Rev. G. H. L. Lingle and the President of Synod. 

St. Paul's Church has sent fourteen young men into the Gospel 
ministry, and at the same time given of her sons and daughters to 
help build up other congregations; nevertheless, St. Paul's is today, 
one of our strongest rural churches. 



List of Pastors: 



John Lentz, 1830-1834 
S. Rothrock, 1835-1843 
Benjamin Arey, 1843-1845 
J. A. Linn, Sr., 1845-1855 
B. C. Hall, 1855-1859 
J. L. Smithdeal, 1859-1860 
Whitson Kimball, 1861-1877 
W. H. Cone, 1878-1880 

B. S. Brown, 1881-1882 

C. A. Rose, 1884-1899 



V. Y. Boozer, 1899-1907 
R. R. Sowers, 1907-1910 
M. L. Ridenhour, 1911-1916 
E. C. Repass ,1917-1918 
C. E. Ridenhour, 1919-1928 
W. H. Lefstead, 1929-1930 
G. H. L. Lingle, 1931-1939 
H. P. Barringer, 1940-1952 
L. C. Bumgarner, 1952- 



ST. PAUL'S, HARDIN 

St. Paul's Church is located five miles north of Dallas in Gaston 
County, in the village of Hardin. 

The church was organized September 20, 1896, with fourteen mem- 
bers by Rev. B. L. Westenberger. Officers elected were: J. F. Plonk, J. A, 



History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 335 

Friday and F. R. Friday. Rev. Westenberger was chosen as pastor. 
Services were held in school buildings until a church could be built. 
The new frame church was completed by the first part of 1898. At a 
meeting held July 7, 1898, it was decided to apply for admission into 
the Joint Synod of Ohio, which was approved by that body. But in 
1912 St. Paul's merged with the Church of the Resurrection and united 
with the Tennessee Synod. 

In 1922, under the pastoral leadership of Rev. C. K. Rhodes, the 
congregation set itself to the commendable task of building a new 
brick church. The building is well designed with basement and class- 
rooms for Sunday School work. It cost about $40,000.00. 

The new church was opened for divine services August 1, 1926, 
by Pastor C. K. Rhodes and the President of Synod. The cornerstone 
was laid on Saturday, September 15, 1934, by Pastor F. M. Speagle and 
Rev. J. Lewis Thornburg, and on the following Sunday, September 16, 
1934, the church was dedicated by the President of Synod, Pastor Speagle, 
and Rev. C. K. Rhodes. 

A modern brick parsonage was built in 1938. 

During the years 1951 and 1952 an Educational Building was 
erected by the church. The cornerstone was laid May 4, 1952, by 
Pastor W. Leo Smith and the President of Synod. The cost of this 
building was $40,000.00. 

List of Pastors: 

The following pastors served St. Paul's from 1897 to 1912: Rev. 
B. L. Westenberger, Rev. J. H. Wannemacher, Rev. G. A. Durhammer, 
Rev. J. M. Senter. 

A. R. Beck, 1912-1917 B. E. Petrea, 1928-1932 

C. E. Fritz, 1917-1919 F. M. Speagle, 1932-1947 

C. N. Yount, 1919-1922 Stu. Ernest Lineberger, 
J. L. Thornburg, Supply, 1922 Supply, 1947 

C. K. Rhodes, 1922-1928 W. Leo Smith, 1947- 



ST. PAUL'S, IREDELL CO. 

St. Paul's Church is located in Iredell County, two miles east of 
Statesville on the Salisbury highway. The original location, however, 
was one mile west of the present church, on the outskirts of Statesville. 
The place is marked by the old graveyard. The church was organized 
May 3, 1840, with twenty-two members by Rev. Benjamin Arey. Of- 
ficers elected were: Henry Lentz, Andrew Rickart, Elders; and David 
Lentz, Moses Raymer, Deacons. 

The first church was a frame building 40 x 60 feet. The framing 
timber was hand hewn, but the finishing lumber was purchased else- 
where. It was built in 1841. 

About 1885, Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Bost deeded two acres of land, on 
the Salisbury highway to St. Paul's church officials, on which to build 



336 



History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 



a new church. Under the pastoral leadership of Rev. H. M. Brown, the 
old church building was dismantled and the framing used in building 
the present church. Much of this work was done by members of the 
congregation. The church was soon finished and was dedicated in 
1886 by Pastor Brown. 

In 1940, the present building was completely remodeled and 
Sunday School rooms were added to the rear of the building. This 
was carried out under the leadership of their pastor. Rev. W. H. Button. 

During 1952 their church lawn was improved, a deep well 
drilled, and an Educational Building is in process of construction. 

For a long while St. I'aurs waS associated with the Troutman 
parish, but in 1950, after a short supply. Rev. W. B. Aull was called 
as full time pastor. 

List of Pastors: 



Benjamin Arey, 1840-1846 
W. H. Funk, 1846-1847 
J. B. Anthony, 1847-1849 
B. N. Hopkins, 1849-1852 
W. G. Harter, Supply, 1852 
S. Scherer, 1852-1855 
John Swicegood, 1855-1856 
Paul Kistler, 1856-1857 
W. Gerhardt, Supply, 1859 
J. A. Linn, Supply, 1860 
J. D. Stingley, 1861-1862 
J. L. Smithdeal, 1863-1865 
J. S. Heilig and 

Whitson Kimball, 1865 
Paul Kistler, 1870 
J. H Fesperman, 1871-1874 
W. R. Ketchie, 1875-1879 
J. B. Anthony, 1880-1882 
H. M. Brown, 1882-1887 
Whitson Kimball, 1888-1889 
T. H. Strohecker, 1889-1890 
D. W. Michael, 1891-1895 



George S. Diven, Supply, 1895 

B. S. Brown, 1896-1899 
R. A. Helms, 1899-1902 

V. C. Ridenhour, 1902-1905 
R. R. Sowers, 1906-1907 

C. R. Pless, 1907-1908 

H. W. Jeffcoat, 1909-1912 
T. C. Parker, 1913-1915 
C. Norman and John L. 

Morgan, Supply, 1915-1916 
John L. Morgan, 1916-1928 
P. D. Risinger, 1928-1930 
R. H. Kepley, 1930-1932 
Roscoe Fisher, Supply, 1932 
P. D. Risinger, 1932-1933 
O. G. Swicegood, 1932-1935 
P. E. Moose, 1935-1938 
J. L Thornburg, Supply, 1938 
W. H. Dutton, 1939-1943 
R. M. Carpenter, 1943-1949 
W. B. Aull, 1950- 



ST. PAUL'S, NEWTON 

St. Paul's Church is located in Catawba County, at Startown, two 
miles southwest of Newton. The original location of this church is two 
miles directly west of Newton where the St. Paul's of the American 
Lutheran Church is located. 

St. Paul's Church at Startown is a continuation of the old St. 
Paul's, which was organized about 1768 or 1770. A division arose in 
that church in 1845 when a part of the congregation withdrew from 



History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 



337 



the Tennessee Synod and later united with the Ohio Synod, now the 
American Lutheran Church. But a large group remained faithful to 
the Tennessee Synod. This group of the Tennessee Synod continued 
to worship in the old St. Paul's building until 1905 when, under the 
leadership of Rev. F. K. Roof, a lot was secured and a new frame 
church was built at Startown. Hence we deem it historically correct to 
say that St. Paul's Church at Startown was first organized at the old 
location about 1768 or 1770. 

The first building at the old place was a small log structure. But 
in 1808 a new church was built. This too was a log house, which was 
weatherboarded and ceiled. It is still used by the American Lutheran 
congregation. 

St. Paul's house of worship at Startown was built in 1905. It 
was destroyed by fire November 26, 1922, while Rev. W. J. Boger, D.D., 
was pastor. The following year a brick building was erected with a 
full basement and Sunday School rooms, and the first service was held 
on December 24, 1923. The cornerstone was laid May 5, 1924. It was 
dedicated on July 28, 1929, by the President of Synod and the Pastor, 
Rev. S. L. Sox. 

Up to the year 1944 St. Paul's was in a parish with other churches, 
but at the beginning of the pastoral service of Rev. Glenn A. Yount 
the congregation assumed the fulltime support of its pastor. 

In 1947, when Rev. Glenn A. Yount was pastor a nine-room par- 
sonage was built at a cost of $14,600.00. 



List of Pastors; 



J. G. Arends, 1785-1807 
Philip Henkel, Asst., 1805-1807. 
Philip Henkel, 1808-1814 
Daniel Moser, 1815-About 1820 
David Henkel, 1820-1831 
Philip Henkel, Adam Miller, 

and George Easterly, 

Supply, 1832 
Adam Miller, Jr., 1835-1846 
J. R. Moser, C. G. Reitzel, 

and P. C. Henkel, Supply, 

1847-1848 
P. C. Henkel, 1849-1869 
J. M. Smith, 1870-1894 
J. A. Rudisill, 1895 



J. C. Moser, 1896-1897 
R. L. Fritz, 1897 

E. J. Sox, 1897-1899 

F. K. Roof, 1900-1912 

B. L. Stroup, Supply, 1913 
A. L. Bolick, 1913-1916 

C. I. Morgan, Supply, 1917 
J. P. Price, Supply, 1918 
W J. Boger, 1918-1927 

E. J. Sox, Supply, 1928 
S. L. Sox, 1929-1932 
J. C. Dietz, 1932-1935 
P. L. Miller, 1936-1944 

G. A. Yount, 1944-1948 
Hugh Kepley, 1949 



ST. PAUL'S, WILMINGTON 

St. Paul's Church is located on the corner of Sixth and Market 
Streets in Wilmington. The church was organized in the old Presby- 
terian church on South Front Street on May 31, 1858, with fifty-eight 



338 History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 

members by Rev, Joseph A. Linn, then President of the Synod, and 
Rev. G. D. Bernheim, D.D. The following officers were elected: N. 
Bremer and A. Adrian, Elders; and W. Koch and H. Rehder, Deacons. 

The Session House of the Protestant Episcopal Church was rented 
where services were held until 1861, when the vestry room of their 
new building was open for services. Two adjoining lots were pur- 
chased, one in 1859, and the other in 1860, thus securing the fine loca- 
tion where their church stands. 

The new church was started in 1860, and on September 6th the 
cornerstone was laid. The building was under cover by the end of 
that same year. The building was 40 x 60 feet with a steeple 125 feet 
high, and the vestry room was 16x30 feet. The North Carolina Synod 
met here in 1861. 

Everything moved along in fine order with the hope of soon 
enjoying the use of a completed church. Then the war between the 
states started, which caused all further work on the church to be 
suspended. In 1862, their Pastor, Rev. J. H. Mengert, resigned and 
they were left without a shepherd at a time when one was most needed. 
In 1865 Federal troops took possession of the church and destroyed 
everything inside of the building. The walls and roof only were left 
standing. This discouraged some of the members so that they were 
ready to disband. Fortunately, Rev. G. D. Bernheim learned of their 
situation and made a trip to Wilmington and encouraged them to 
finish their church. Thus the building was completed by July 1869 
and was dedicated August 22, 1869, by Rev. G. D. Bernheim, Rev. C. H. 
Bernheim, Rev. L. Muller, and Rev. W. A. Julian. 

A parsonage was built in 1870 on a lot adjoining the church 
property. In 1884, they completed their Luther Memorial Building for 
Sunday School and Parochial School, but it was destroyed by fire in 
1894. It was rebuilt right away. Dr. A. G. Voigt was pastor here 1898- 
1903. 

The church was enlarged in 1906 by adding transepts, and on 
September 15, 1907, a rededication service was held. A new Educational 
Building, three stories high, was constructed in 1940-1941 under the 
pastoral leadership of Rev. W. B. Freed. This building was dedicated 
October 19, 1941, by Pastor Freed, Dr. E. F. Keever, Rev. Carl H. Fisher, 
and the President of Synod. 

List of Pastors: 

John H. Mengert, 1858-1862 W. A. Snyder, 1904-1912 

Vacant, 1862-1869 F. B. Clausen, 1912-1918 

G. D. Bernheim, 1869-1881 John C. Seegers, 1918-1921 

F. W. E. Peschau, 1882-1892 Edwin F. Keever, 1922-1937 

G. D. Bernheim, Supply, 1892 Walter B Freed, 1937-1948 
K. Boldt, 1893-1897 J. F. Davis, 1948- 

A. G. Voigt, 1898-1903 



History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 339 



ST. PETER'S, CATAWBA 

St. Peter's Lutheran Church is located in the Oxford Ford section 
of Catawba County. The deed for the church land was made in 1827, 
however it is thought the church was organized some years prior to 
that time. The cornerstone of the old church bears the date 1825, and 
the first baptism record is August 28, 1825. Rev. C. O. Smith, who 
prepared a brief history for this church at a cornerstone laying service 
in 1949, thinks the church may have been started by Rev. R. J. Miller, 
one of the four pastors who organized the North Carolina Synod in 
1803. If that be so, then the organization took place sometime prior 
to 1821, for Rev. Miller discontinued his work with the Lutheran Church 
in that year. 

Be this as it may, the congregation itself feels sure the or- 
ganization was effected not later than 1825, and on the basis of that 
belief celebrated its 125th anniversary in the year 1950. St. Peter's 
was connected with the Tennessee Synod until 1897, after which 
it united with the Missouri Synod. Its first house of worship was a 
log building. The second church was a frame structure, erected in 
1873. Their present large brick building was dedicated in 1940. Two 
of our early Lutheran ministers are buried at this church — Rev. P. 
C. Henkel and Rev. C. G. Reitzel. Pastors who served this church in 
connection with the Tennessee Synod, so far as we know, were: 

List of Pastors: 

Daniel Moser, 1825-1839 No pastor, 1862-1865 

C. G. Reitzel, 1839-1849 J. M. Smith, 1865-1876 

Timothy Moser, 1949-1856 P. C. Henkel, 1877-1889 

J. M. Smith, 1856-1862 Uncertain, 1889-1897 



ST. PETER'S, ROWAN CO. 

St. Peter's Church is located in Rowan County, three miles east 
of Rockwell. According to Bernheim's History of the Lutheran Church 
in the Carolinas, page 244, a small hickory log church was built here 
in 1745 by Lutherans and German Reformed. But, after some years, 
church homes were established elsewhere, and the log building was no 
longer used, but allowed to decay. 

Then, about 1830, a small group of Lutherans of the Tennessee 
Synod organized a congregation here, which was first called the Krauth 
Memorial Lutheran Church. On May 12, 1832, a three-acre tract of land 
was purchased from Jacob Fulenwider for $12.00, on which a frame 
church 30 x 40 feet was built. The building was closed in, but the 
interior was left unfinished. 

In 1855, Rev. Joseph A. Linn, and Samuel Rothrock, D.D., began 
holding services here, and a congregation of the North Carolina Synod 
was organized. Meanwhile the church building was completed, with 



340 



History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 



gallery on three sides, and a high pulpit. In 1858 the congregation was 
received into the North Carolina Synod and the name was changed to 
St. Peter's. This church stood in what is now the new part of the 
graveyard. 

On April 7, 1883, the cornerstone of a new church was laid. This 
also is a frame building, originally about 40 x 60 feet. It was com- 
pleted and dedicated June 29, 1884, by the pastor, Rev. T. H. Strohecker, 
and Rev. J. B. Davis, D.D., during a meeting of Conference. Transepts 
were added to the building in 1924, while Rev. B. M. Clark was pastor. 

The congregation was, for many years, in a parish with St. Mat- 
thew's, but in 1947 these churches became self-supporting. 

A hut 30 X 60 feet was built in 1947, and in 1948 a new parsonage 
was built, while Rev. Paul L. Morgan was pastor. 

List of Pastors : 



J. R. Moser, 1836 

Jacob Killian, 1837-1838 

H. Wetzel, 1839 

J. Stirewalt, 1840 

J. W. Hull, 1842-1845 

Adam Efird, 1847-1853 

J. A. Linn, 1853-1855 

S. Rothrock, 1855-1868 

S. Scherer, 1868-1870 

W. H. Cone, 1871-1877 

J. A. Linn, Jr., 1877-1880 

T. H. Strohecker, 1881-1885 

H. A. Trexler, Supply, 1885 

S. Rothrock, Supply, 1885-1886 

H. A. Trexler, 1886-1892 

W. P. Huddle, 1893-1897 



W. B. Oney, 1897-1898 

E. W. Leslie, 1899-1902 

R. L. Brown, Supply, 1903 

F. M. Harr, 1903-1906 

J. A. Linn, Jr., 1907-1909 

H. A. Trexler, Supply, 1909-1910 

W, C. Buck, 1910-1913 

H. A. Trexler, 1914-1920 

G. H. Cooper, 1920-1923 
B. M. Clark, 1923-1929 
A. K. Hewitt, 1929-1932 
F. P. Cauble, 1932-1938 

O. G. Swicegood, 1938-1847 
E. A. Dasher, Supply, 1947 
Paul L. Morgan, 1948-1949 
E A. Dasher, 1950- 



ST. STEPHEN'S, GOLD HILL 

St. Stephen's Church is located in Cabarrus County, three miles 
west of Gold Hill on the Mt. Pleasant road. This work was started in 
1837, when six leading citizens of this community — John Peck, John 
Lentz, Solomon Nussman, Peter Troutman, Henry Barringer, and George 
Culp — met in a schoolhouse near where the church now stands and 
decided to build a church in this vicinity. So, St. Stephen's Church 
was organized December 25, 1837, under the direction of Rev. P. A. 
Strobel with thirty-two members. The organization was effected in the 
home of John Peck, one mile west from the present church site. Of- 
ficers elected were: John Lentz, John Peck, Elders; and Solomon Nuss- 



History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 



341 



man and Charles Barringer, Deacons. John Peck resigned and Henry 
Lentz was elected in his place. Solomon Nussman was a grandson of 
the Rev. Adolph Nussman, the first Lutheran minister located in North 
Carolina. 

Their first church was located across the road, where the ceme- 
tery is now. Soon after Rev. Whitson Kimball became pastor in 1880, 
plans were worked out for a new church. The building is a frame 
structure, and it was completed in 1882. The North Carolina Synod met 
here, in the new church, in 1883, and the building was dedicated at 
that meeting. This meeting marked the 400th year of Luther's birth. 

A belfry was added while Rev. G. H. L. Lingle was pastor, and 
Sunday School rooms were built in 1925, while Rev. J. A. Yount was 
there. New pews and other furnishings were installed and the entire 
church was refinished in 1937 for the Centennial celebration, under Rev. 
Button's leadership. The congregation recently built a recreational 
building, and now plans are in the making for a new parsonage to be 
located near the church. 

List of Pastors: 



P. A. Strobel, 1837-1843 
Samuel Rothrock, 1844-1855 
J. A. Linn, 1856-1863 
L. C. Groseclose, 1865-1866 
R. L. Brown, 1867-1873 
W. R. Ketchie, 1873 
P. A. Strobel, 1874-1875 
S. Rothrock, 1876-1879 
Whitson Kimball, 1880-1885 
A. D. L. Moser, 1886-1887 
G. H. Cox, 1888-1894 
P. H. E. Derrick, 1895-1897 
G. A. Riser, 1898-1899 



W. A. Dutton, 1900-1907 

H. E. H. Sloop, 1907-1909 

G. H. L. Lingle, 1910-1914 

C. M. Fox, 1914-1916 

M. L. Ridenhour, 1917-1919 

M. L. Kester, 1920-1921 

E. K. Bodie, 1921-1924 

J. A. Yount, 1924-1926 

W. H. Dutton, 1927-1938 

C. A. Misenheimer, 1939-1943 

G. A. Miller, 1944-1950 

G. C. Cruse, 1951- 



ST. STEPHEN'S. HICKORY 

St. Stephen's Church is located in Catawba County, on the Springs 
Road, one mile east of Hickory. Occasional preaching services were 
held in the home of Mrs. John Miller, and at other places in the com- 
munity, by Rev. David Henkel for some years before there was a 
church here. A congregation was organized by Rev. Daniel Moser in 
the year 1837, and a church erected the following year. This church 
stood a short distance to the east of the present St. Stephen's. It was 
constructed of hewn logs with a gallery floored with loose boards. 
The seats were made of slabs, with legs for support but no backs. It 
is said that no provision was made to heat the building. David Yount, 
who was living when the present St. Stephen's Church was dedicated, 
and Lee Bostian Bolch, cut the first tree for this first church. 



342 History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 

The land for the church was given by Frederick Miller, who 
requested that it be called "Miller's Church." 

In the year 1845, a disturbance arose in the Tennessee Synod over 
the conduct of one of the pastors, which occasioned a number of mem- 
bers of this congregation to withdraw and form a. new congregation, 
which later united with the Ohio Synod. 

Rev. P. C. Henkel became pastor here, a second time, after render- 
ing chaplaincy service in the Civil War, and led the congregation 
in building a new church. This was a joint undertaking by the two 
groups worshiping there. The building was an octagon shaped struc- 
ture, which stood near the road, almost opposite from the present 
Miller's Church. But when they got ready to dedicate the new church, 
the two congregations could not agree on a name. Those that had 
left the Synod wanted to retain the name Miller's, but the ones who 
remained loyal to the Tennessee Synod wanted it changed to St. 
Stephen's. So the church was dedicated, in 1868, as St. Stephen's 
Lutheran Church. But a few days later the other group dedicated it, 
as Miller's Church. 

While Rev. A. L. Crouse was pastor, 1890-1903, another disturb- 
ance arose which occasioned a majority of the members to go with 
Pastor Crouse to the Missouri Synod — hence a third Lutheran Church 
in that same community. 

While Rev. C. L. Miller, D.D., was pastor, the present St. Stephen's 
brick church, of the Tennessee Synod, was built. It was dedicated 
October 3, 1909, by Pastor Miller and Rev. J. A. Yount. In 1926-1927, 
while Rev. C. N. Yount was pastor, a new brick Educational annex 
was built at a cost of $5,000.00. 

A lot was given by Mr. and Mrs. A. D. Ekard, on which a new 
parsonage was built in 1948 at a cost of $21,000.00. It was dedicated, 
December 31, 1950, by the President of Synod and their pastor, Rev. 
C. R. Patterson. 

List of Pastors: 

Daniel Moser, 1837-1839 J. A. Yount, 1905-1906 

Adam Miller, Jr., 1839-1845 C. L. Miller, 1907-1910 

Christian Reitzel, 1845-1849 J. D. Mauney, 1911-1914 

P. C. Henkel, 1849-1864 E. J. Sox, 1914-1920 

Henry Goodman, 1864 Enoch Kite, 1921-1924 

P. C. Henkel, 1865-1873 C. N. Yount, 1925-1935 

J. M. Smith, 1873-1877 R. H. Kepley, 1935-1943 

P. C. Henkel, 1877-1890 C. W. Harbinson, 1943-1947 

A. L. Crouse, 1890-1903 C. R. Patterson, 1947- 

E. J. Sox, 1903-1905 • 



History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 343 



ST. STEPHEN'S, LENOIR 

St. Stephen's Church is located on West Avenue in the town of 
Lenoir, the county seat of Caldwell County, and a leading furniture 
manufacturing center. 

This church was organized in the year 1908 by Rev. W. A. Deaton, 
D.D., field missionary of the Tennessee Synod, with nine charter mem- 
bers. The organization took place in the home of Mr. and Mrs. L. E. 
Rabb. It may be of interest to note that the Rabb home is located 
where Rev. R. J. Miller once lived, who was one of the four Lutheran 
ministers to organize the Lutheran Synod of North Carolina. The lot 
for St. Stephen's Church was purchased in 1907, by a number of local 
interested Lutherans. 

The present brick church, 40 x 60 feet in dimensions, was con- 
structed during 1909-1910, under the pastoral supervision of Rev. J. A. 
Yount. The basement of the church was not completed, however, until 
1923, while Rev. L. D. Miller was pastor. A Hammond organ and 
Deagan chimes, the gift of Mr. and Mrs. Herman Payne, were dedicated 
on April 18, 1937, by Pastor L. S. Miller. 

Their first parsonage, which was a frame building, was bought 
in 1914 for $1200.00. This property was later sold, and a new location 
secured on Beall Street, while Rev. R. B. Fisher was pastor, and a new 
parsonage was constructed in 1948, at a cost of $18,000.00. This build- 
ing is modern in both design and equipment. 

The congregation is now gathering funds for a new church in a 
different location in the city. 

Rev. C. S. King is the present pastor. 

List of Pastors: 

W. A. Deaton, 1908-1909 P. D. Risinger, 1924-1928 

J. A. Yount, 1909-1911 L. S. Miller, 1928-1943 

J. F. Deal, 1911-1915 R. B. Fisher, 1944-1952 

W. J. Roof, 1915-1918 C. S. King, 1952- 
L. D. Miller, 1918-1924 



ST. TIMOTHY, CATAWBA COUNTY 

St. Timothy Lutheran Church is located in Catawba County, six 
miles east from Hickory, on the south side of the Southern Railroad. 
The congregation was organized on Sunday, November 6, 1887, by Dr. 
D. C. Huffman, at the residence of Andrew Holler. H. A. Herman, 
D. P. Miller, and J. A. Yount were elected officers. For lack of a 



344 History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 

building, no further services were held for the newly organized group 
until February 5, 1888, at which time Rev. C. H. Bernheim preached, 
and was called as pastor. 

Their first church was a frame structure, which was completed 
in 1888. The first worship service held in the completed building was 
on March 1 of that year. The first parsonage, which stood on the 
east side of the church, was built under the pastoral leadership of 
Rev. F. K. Roof. 

St. Timothy was placed in a parish with Beth Eden, Newton, in 1916, 
and remained so until 1944, when it was mutually decided that each 
church should have a fulltime pastor. The present brick church was 
built under the pastoral leadership of Rev. A. R. Beck, D.D., at an 
approximate cost of $14,000.00. The church was opened for worship 
services on June 6, 1926, with a sermon by Pastor Beck, who was assisted 
in the communion service by Rev. C. N. Yount. 

The church was dedicated, free of debt, on January 4, 1931, by 
the pastor. Dr. Beck. The sermon was preached by President J. L. Morgan. 

Their new brick parsonage on the Hickory highway, was built 
in 1945, under the leadership of Pastor F. Leslie Conrad, Jr., at a cost 
of around $12,500.00. This parsonage was dedicated by the President 
of Synod, on December 17, 1950. 

In 1951 their old reed organ was replaced by a Moeller Pipe 
Organ, which was dedicated that same year, the service being in 
charge of their pastor. Rev. J. L. Lackey. Money is now being raised 
for an educational building, and a well has been drilled. 

List of Pastors: 

C. H. Bernheim, 1888-1893 A. R. Beck, 1921-1942 

J. P. Miller, 1893-1895 J. Wilford Lyerly and 
J. L. Cromer, 1895-1899 Others, Supply, 1942-1944 

F. K. Roof, 1900-1912 F. Leslie Conrad, Jr., 1944-1949 

A. L. Boliek, 1913-1916 J. L. Lackey, 1949- 
V. L. Fulmer, 1916-1920 



TRINITY, CABARRUS CO. 

Trinity Church is located in Cabarrus County, five miles west 
of Kannapolis. The church was organized July 18, 1857, with nineteen 
members by Rev. John S. Heilig. Daniel Seaford was elected as Elder, 
and David Shulenberger was chosen as Deacon. 

The congregation was placed in a parish with St. Enoch, where 
it remained until 1938, when it became self-sustaining. 



History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 345 

The first building was a frame structure 30x40 feet, erected the 
same year in which it was organized. Some think it was a log building 
at first, but this is uncertain. It is generally understood that Daniel 
Fisher did the first work on the frame building. 

In 1897, under the pastoral leadership of Rev. V. R. Stickley, a 
new brick church 40 x 60 feet was constructed. The cornerstone was 
laid July 17, 1897, by Pastor Stickley and Rev. J. Q. Wertz. The build- 
ing was completed and dedicated November 7, 1897, by Pastor V. R. 
Stickley, who was at that time President of Synod; assisted by Rev. 
J. Q. Wertz; Rev. M. G. G. Scherer, D.D.; and Rev. H. N. Miller, Sec- 
retary of Synod. 

On May 1, 1913 H, W. Ludwig gave this church $2000.00 as an 
endowment fund. 

In 1937 this congregation built a new parsonage on a lot donated 
for that purpose, near the church. 

October 17, 1948, a groundbreaking service was held for a new 
Educational Building. This work has been carried out under the 
leadership of Pastor B. D. Castor. At the same time the nave of 
the church has been remodeled and redecorated. 

List of Pastors: 

J. S. Heilig, 1857-1866 G. H. Cox, 1908-1911 

J. W. Barrier, 1866-1867 O. B. Shearouse, 1912-1917 

A. D. L. Moser, 1868-1873 B. S. Dasher, 1918-1924 

W. A. Julian, 1874-1878 L. P. Boland, 1924-1931 

W. A. Lutz, 1880-1891 G. L. Barger, 1932-1940 

V. R. Stickley, 1892-1903 K. Y. Huddle, 1941-1946 

J. L. Morgan, 1903-1907 B. D. Castor, 1947-1953 
C. M. Fox, 1908 



TRINITY, LANDIS 

The first Lutheran service held in Landis was on March 20, 
1904 in a school building. Rev. J. Q. Wertz read the Scripture lesson, 
Rev. D. I. Offman offered prayer, and Rev. J. L. Morgan preached the 
sermon from the text. Numbers 10:29. The above named neighboring 
pastors held services here occasionally, until more definite arrange- 
ments were made. 

On July 9, 1907, Rev. Morgan, who had recently been elected 
Field Missionary, visited Landis, and plans were made for holding 
services one Sunday per month in the Methodist Church. At the 
Easter service, conducted on Sunday afternoon, April 11, 1909, by Rev. 
J. L. Morgan, an organization was effected with 32 members, to which 
nine others were added later, making 41. Officers elected were: 
Rufus Beaver and J. J. Barringer, Elders; J. R. Rice and A .L. Sechler, 
Deacons; G. O. Lipe, Secretary; F. E. Wright, Treasurer; J. C. Deaton, 
Solicitor of building funds. 



346 History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 

A lot was secured on the corner of Mooresville Road and Zion 
Street, and a frame church was begun November 28, 1909, and com- 
pleted in May 1910, at a cost of approximately $2,000.00. 

The Sunday School was organized on May 29, 1910, and the 
first preaching service was held in the church by Pastor Morgan on 
June 5, 1910. Pastor Morgan's last service as mission pastor was on 
Sunday, May 21, 1911. He then moved to Raleigh, as mission developer. 

The church in Landis and Concordia congregation were now 
constituted a parish, and called Rev. B. S. Brown, D.D., Sr. as regular 
pastor. A parsonage was built in 1912 at a cost of about $1,200.00. 
The church was dedicated August 3, 1913 by Dr. Brown and Missionary 
Pastor Morgan, who preached the sermon. 

On March 6, 1927, it was unanimously agreed to build a new 
brick church. Groundbreaking services for the new building were 
held June 20, 1927, in charge of Rev. C. O. Lippard, pastor, assisted by 
Rev. J. L. Morgan, President of Synod. The name of the church was 
changed from Landis Lutheran Church to Trinity Lutheran Church. 
The cornerstone was laid August 29, 1927, in charge of Pastor Lippard, 
assisted by Dr. B. S. Brown, Sr. and Rev. P. D. Risinger. 

The first service held in the new church was on Sunday, January 
8, 1928, with the sermon by Pastor Lippard. This service was held in 
the church basement. The first service in the nave was held on Decem- 
ber 2, 1928, in charge of Pastor Lippard, the sermon was by President 
J. L. Morgan. 

The church was dedicated, free of debt, June 5, 1938, on their 
30th Anniversary. The service was in charge of their pastor. Rev. C. 
P. Fisher, D.D., and the sermon was preached by President Morgan. 

In 1939 extra Sunday School rooms were added, and the par- 
sonage was remodeled, all at a cost of $8,000.00. 

In 1944 it was agreed to divide this parish so that each congre- 
gation could have fulltime pastoral service. Dr. Fisher remained 
at Trinity, and the new arrangement went into effect January 1, 1945, 
but he was called away by death October 26 that same year. After 
Pastor Fisher's death, the congregation was supplied for about a year 
by Rev. W. B. Aull. Meanwhile a new Moeller organ was installed 
and dedicated. 

The congregation, under the pastoral leadership of Rev. C. V. 
Deal, is now gathering funds for a new, modern Educational building, 
for which a groundbreaking service was held December 21, 1952. 

List of Pastors: 

J. L. Morgan, 1907-1911 C. O. Lippard, 1924-1930 

B. S. Brown, Sr., 1911-1915 C. P. Fisher, 1930-1945 
P. E. Shealy, 1916-1917 W. B. Aull, Supply, 1946 

C. L Morgan, 1917-1921 C. V. Deal, 1947- 
P. D. Risinger, 1922-1924 



History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 347 

trinity, rocky mount 

Trinity Lutheran Church is located on Cokey Road and Tarboro 
Street in Rocky Mount, Edgecombe County, N. C. 

This congregation was developed by Rev. S. White Rhyne, as 
Field Missionary of Synod. The first group meeting was held in the 
Y.M.C.A. Building on Friday night, June 16, 1922. The first worship 
service was held in the Y.M.C.A. Building on Sunday, June 18, the 
same year, in charge of Pastor Rhyne, with eleven present. 

Service were held in this building occasionally for about a year. 
The church was organized on Sunday, January 28, 1923, with 18 charter 
members, by Pastor Rhyne and President J. L. Morgan. There were 41 
at the services that day and Dr. Morgan gave the meditation. Officers 
elected were: Dr. C. E. Minges, Joe Fulenwider, Phifer Fulenwider, 
H. L. Arndt. 

On March 3, 1923, a lot for the church was purchased for $4,- 
000.00; however, more than $3,000.00 had to be spent on street improve- 
ments and a culvert. Work was begun on building the parsonage- 
chapel October 24, 1924. It cost $15,000.00, and was opened for services 
May 10, 1925. 

Pastor Rhyne resigned September 30, 1926, to accept work with 
the Parish and Church School Board of the U.L.C.A. 

When Rev. C. Ross Ritchie became pastor June 1, 1927, he found 
a debt of $10,000.00 which was paid off by November, 1935. 

On July 10, 1937, ground was staked off for the new church, 
which included an annex for a Sunday School. Ground-breaking ser- 
vices were held July 11, 1937, by President J. L. Morgan and Pastor 
Ritchie. The church was finished and formally opened for worship 
June 12 1938, in charge of Pastor Ritchie, President Morgan, and Dr. S. 
White Rhyne. The approximate cost of the church with its furnishings 
was $20,000.00. 

Pastor Ritchie resigned June 1, 1939, at which time the member- 
ship was 94, and the debt for the new church was $11,800.00. 

On May 30, 1943, the church and parsonage were dedicated, 
all free of debt, in charge of the pastor. Rev. J. W. Cobb, assisted by 
Dr. S. White Rhyne, and President J. L. Morgan. Rev. Cobb resigned 
June 3, 1943, to accept a call to the College Church at Blacksburg, 
Virginia. 

This congregation went on a self-supporting basis January 1, 
1947, under the pastoral leadership of Rev. B. L. Trexler. 

Rev. E. R. Lineberger, Jr., was pastor here about one year, and 
resigned to become a Navy chaplain. The present pastor is Rev. Hoke 
H. Ritchie. Members of this church have not only helped their own 
local church, but they, at the same time, gave liberally to the support 
of many other churches and worthy causes. 

List of Pastors: 
S. W. Rhyne, 1922-1926 B. L. Trexler, 1943-1949 

H. C. Castor, Sup., 1926-1927 E. R. Lineberger, Jr., 1950-1951 

C. R. Ritchie, 1927-1939 H. H. Ritchie, 1951- 

J. W. Cobb, 1939-1943 



348 History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 

TRINITY. SANFORD 

Trinity Lutheran Church is located in Lee County on Carthage 
Street in Sanford, N. C. 

This work was started by Rev. D. P. Rudisill, Ph.D., while he 
was doing post graduate study at Duke University. The first service 
was held in the Steel Street Methodist Church July 11, 1943. On 
September 22, 1943, a lot was secured, 226x200 feet in dimensions, 
for $2,250.00, same to be paid for on a fifty-fifty basis by the mission 
and the Synod. The organization of the church was begun on February 
13, 1944, by Pastor Rudisill, assisted by President J. L Morgan, but 
the membership list was left open for additional names. 

Rev. Vance M. Daniel became pastor March 1, 1944. One mem- 
ber of the Mission Committee, Mr. P. M. Barger, paid half of the pastor's 
salary, for two years. 

The organization of the church was completed July 9, 1944, with 
30 charter members, by Pastor Daniel. 

A parsonage was purchased during 1946 for $4,600.00 for which 
the Brotherhood made a loan of $3,000.00. In September 1946 a hut 
was built at a cost of $1,600.00, which served their needs until the 
church was ready. 

Groundbreaking services for the church were held on Easter 
Sunday, March 28, 1945, by Pastor Daniel, President V. R. Cromer, and 
Dr. J. L. Morgan. 

The building is of brick, colonial design, with a beautiful nave 
and chancel, and an Educational Annex. The contract price was $41,- 
898.00. The mission congregation, the Missionary Society, the Brother- 
hood, the Luther League, and the Synod all cooperated in financing 
this building. The cornerstone was laid July 11, 1948, by Pastor Daniel, 
Rev. D. P. Rudisill, Ph.D., Rev. V. R. Cromer, D.D., and the President 
of Synod. 

The church was opened for services February 27, 1949, with a 
sermon by Pastor Daniel. 

The present pastor. Rev. H. A. Kuhn, took charge June 1, 1951. 

List of Pastors: 
V. M. Daniel, 1944-1951 H. A. Kuhn, 1951- 



TRINITY, VALE 

Trinity Church is located in Lincoln County at Vale, about seven 
miles west of Lincolnton. The first Lutheran service conducted in this 
community, of which we have knowledge, was held in the Lutz or Siegle 
School House, March 5, 1814, at which two children were baptized. 

A few years later the group selected the present location for 
a church, and in 1822 a house of worship, made of hewn logs, was built, 



History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 



349 



and the name "Trinity" was chosen for the church. The first service 
held in the new building was that of a funeral for Daniel Lutz's child 
on October 1, 1822, by Rev. David Henkel. 

It is generally understood that Trinity Church was organized in 
1822 by Rev. David Henkel, who became their first pastor. He states 
in his diary that he installed three Elders of this church on Sunday, 
June 16, 1822, and baptized three infants, and that he gave Holy Com- 
munion on the following Monday. It appears that the church was 
started with twenty- five members, but by October 25, 1822, when the 
second communion was administeted, the number had increased to 
seventy-five. 

Pastor Henkel's last service here was on July 24, 1830, when he 
resigned on account of failing health. He was succeeded by Rev. Adam 
Miller, Jr. in 1834. In 1846, Rev. Henkel's son, Rev. P. C. Henkel, be- 
came pastor. 

It was during Rev. M. L. Little's pastorate that the old log church 
was dismantled and a new brick church was built. The building 
was enlarged and remodeled in 1911, while Rev. M. L. Pence was pastor. 
During Rev. Dr. L. L. Lohr's pastorate eight new classrooms were added 
to the building in 1927, and a lighting system installed. In 1943, under 
the leadership of Rev. W. J. Roof, the nave of the church was completely 
remodeled and reconstructed, and a new chancel was installed. 

In the year 1950, the old parsonage at Vale was sold, and a modern 
brick home was built a short distance from the church, when Rev. 
Glenn A. Miller was called, and became their first fulltime pastor. 



List of Pastors: 



David Henkel, 1822-1830 
Adam Miller, Jr., 1831 
Philip Henkel and 

George Easterly, Supply, 1832 
Nehemiah Bonham, 1833 
Adam Miller, Jr., 1834-1845 
P. C. Henkel, 1846-1854 
A. J. Fox, 1854-1874 
M. L. Little, Supply, 1873-1876 
M. L. Little, 1876-1883 
J. A. Rudisill, 1883-1895 
J. C. Wessinger, 1895-1904 
R. H. Cline, 1904-1906 



J. F. Deal, 1906-1907 

W. A. Deaton, 1907 

M. L. Pence, 1908-1914 

D. L. Miller, 1916-1918 

J. A. Yount, 1919 

J. J. Bickley, 1920-1922 

B. J. Wessinger, 1922-1926 

L. L. Lohr, 1927-1930 

W. A. Sigmon, 1931-1937 

Wade Yount, Supply, 1937-1938 

W. J. Roof, 1938-1950 

Student H. C. Linn, 1950 

G. A. Miller, 1950- 



UNION CHURCH, SALISBURY 



Union Church is located on the Bringle Ferry Road, about five 
miles east of Salisbury. The date of the organization is not definitely 
known. Rev. Arends organized it while he was pastor of Organ Church. 
The date given in the Minutes of Synod is 1774. The warrant for a survey 



350 History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 

for a land grant was issued on June 6, 1778, for a tract of 118 acres for 
this church. The land was deeded to the "Dutch Pine Meeting House", 
later known as Union Church, on November 26, 1793. The deed is 
signed by Richard Dobbs Spaight, Governor of North Carolina, with 
the Seal of the State affixed thereto. From this record it is certain 
that an organized church was in operation here as far back as 1778, 
and may have been much earlier. 

The first house of worship was constructed of hewn pine logs, hence 
it was called the Pine Church. It was weatherboarded on the outside 
and ceiled on the inside. This building was erected in 1779 and was 
used until 1879 — a period of 100 years. It stood a little north of the 
present church. There was a gallery on three sides, a high pulpit on 
the north side, a door in the south end and one in the side next to 
the graveyard. Some of the timber in this old church was used to 
build the first parsonage, which still stands across from the church. 
Some of the old timber was used in the old school building, which 
has been renovated and made into a recreational unit for the church. 

The present church is of brick and was constructed in 1879 
while Rev. R. L. Brown was pastor. It was dedicated on the first Sun- 
day in December 1879, with the President of the Synod, Rev. L. A. 
Bikle assisting in the service. The cost of the building was approxi- 
mately $2600. The building is 40 x 60 feet, with a gallery on one end. 
In 1910, a tower was built and a bell installed, while Rev. L. B. Spracher 
was pastor. In 1925, during the pastorate of Rev. J. C. Dietz, a Sunday 
School annex was built, and a brick parsonage was completed in 1928. 
In 1951 and 1952, under the pastorate of Rev. Thurmond C. Plexico, 
the old church was completely renovated, two Sunday School annexes 
constructed, two transepts added, a beautiful chime system installed, 
and a new tower has been completed. 

Union Church was at one time in a parish with Organ Church, 
then with St. John's Church (Salisbury). But when the Rev. Simeon 
Scherer was pastor, he organized Christiana Church in 1871 which 
was placed in a parish with Union and remained so until 1908, when, 
during the pastoral services of Rev. L. B. Spracher, Union congregation 
decided to operate on a full time pastoral basis. Preliminary services 
to the organization of Synod in 1803, including Holy Communion, were 
held in Union Church. 

List of Pastors: 

J. G. Arends (Visitation Vacant, 1873 

Services) 1774-1785 W. H. Cone, 1874 

C. A. G. Storch, R. L. Brown, 1874-1884 

Part Time), 1788-1810 Student H. L. Yarger, 1884 

Vacant, 1820-1823 J. M. Hedrick, 1885 

Daniel Jenkins, 1823 J. W. Strickler, 1886-1889 

John Reck, 1826-1831 J. Q. Wertz, 1890-1893 

Samuel Rothrock, 1833-1835 C. A. Brown, 1894-1900 

Daniel Jenkins, 1836 Student J. L. Morgan, 1900 



History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 



351 



Samuel Rothrock, 1837-1842 
William Artz, 1843 
Samuel Rothrock, 1844 
J. B. Anthony, 1845-1846 
W. G. Harter, 1847-1850 
L. C. Groseclose, 1851 
Simeon Scherer, 1852-1854 
Vacant, 1855 
B. C Hall, 1856 
L. C. Groseclose, 1857-1865 
D. I. Dreher, 1867 
W. H. Cone, 1867-1868 
Simeon Scherer, 1869-1872 



J. P. Miller, 1900-1903 
N. D. Bodie, 1903-1907 
L. B. Spracher, 1908-1914 
R. L. Patterson, 1914-1915 
C. R. Pless, 1916-1919 
J. B. Haigler, 1919-1922 
J. C. Dietz, 1923-1925 
N. D. Bodie, 1926-1927 
J. C. Dietz, 1927-1932 
B. E. Petrea, 1932-1949 
W. B. Weant, 1949-1951 
T. C. Plexico, 1951- 



WHITE HAVEN, LOWESVILLE 

The original White Haven Church was located in the northeastern 
corner of Gaston County, just across the line between Lincoln and 
Gaston, one mile south of Lowesville. 

It appears that this church was organized about 1786, by Rev. 
R. J. Miller, who was then a licensed minister of the Methodist Church. 
The congregation was made up of members of different denominations; 
the Lutherans being the most numerous. 

The congregation wanted Rev. Mr. Miller to be ordained, but he 
had been brought up as an Episcopalian in his home church in Scotland 
and preferred Episcopal orders. However, there was no Bishop of that 
church available during that post war period. So he was ordained by the 
Lutheran ministry in St. John's Lutheran Church in Cabarrus County, 
N. C, on May 20, 1794. From that time on he served White Haven 
until about 1812 or maybe 1813, after which time he moved to another 
field. 

It was while Rev. Mr. Miller was pastor at White Haven that 
he took part, with three other ministers, in organizing the North Caro- 
lina Synod in 1803. It is said that, shortly before Pastor Miller left 
White Haven, he recommended Rev. David Henkel as his successor. 
But a misunderstanding arose between Pastor Miller and Rev. Henkel 
over the scheduled time for services, so that Rev. Mr. Henkel and some 
of the members withdrew and organized a new congregation about a 
mile away, and called it White Haven. 

From that time on there were two congregations of the same 
name. The older one eventually came under the control of the Epis- 
copal Church, but was discontinued about 1849. The old graveyard 



352 History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 

marks the location. The new congregation remained small in num- 
bers, but continued active so long as Rev. David Henkel was able to 
serve them, but after his death, in 1831, the congregation began to 
lose ground, and was finally absorbed by other denominations. 



WITTENBERG, GRANITE QUARRY 

Wittenberg Church is located on Bank Street in Granite Quarry, 
Rowan County, N. C. The original location was on North Main Street. 

The church was organized September 8, 1901, with 16 members 
by Rev. G. H. Cox, D.D., then pastor of Organ Church. The service 
was held in the old School building on the corner of Oak and Peeler 
Streets. 

The old lot on Main Street, paralleling the railroad, was pur- 
chased from R. B. Peeler for $50.00 February 8, 1902. Dr. Cox supplied 
the congregation for a while, but was called as regular pastor January 
1, 1904, and moved into his own house near the church. 

The construction of the church building was begun on Thanks- 
giving Day in 1902. It was a small frame building and is now used 
as a dwelling house. The cornerstone was laid May 2, 1903, by Dr. 
Cox and Rev. J. Q. Wertz. The building was completed in November, 
1903, at a cost of $1892.98. It was dedicated December 30, 1906, by 
Rev. N. D. Bodie, Rev. C. A. Brown, Rev. H. A. McCullough, and the 
pastor, Dr. G. H. Cox. 

Soon after Rev. C. P. Fisher became pastor here, plans were 
made for a new church. The W. T. Peeler family made the church a 
donation of the present church lot on Bank Street. The contract for 
building the stone church was let in 1936. The cornerstone was laid 
on Sunday, September 20, 1936, by Pastor Fisher, the President of Synod, 
and neighboring pastors. 

The building was dedicated on Thanksgiving Day, November 28, 
1940, by the President of Synod, Rev. C. P. Fisher, Rev. B. E. Petrea, 
and Rev. C. N. Yount, with greetings by others. The building cost 
about $25,000.00 and was financed by the local people. The basement 
was not completed until 1951 at an additional cost of $6,000.00 under 
Pastor M. J. Kluttz' administration. An electric organ was installed 
in 1949 in honor and in memory of her servicemen. 

List of Pastors: 

Dr. G. H. Cox, 1901-1908 G. O. Ritchie, Supply, 

J. A. Linn, 1909-1911 1922-1926 

R. R Sowers, 1911-1913 L. E. Blackwelder, 

N. D. Bodie, 1914-1918 Supply, 1927-1929 

C. R. Pless, 1919-1922 C. P. Fisher, Supply, 1930-1940 

M. J. Kluttz, 1940-1952 



History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 353 



ZION, HICKORY 

Zion Church is located about five miles south of Hickory. Rev. 
Arends refers to it in his Journal as "New South Fork" to distinguish 
it from St. Paul's, which was called "South Fork." This church was 
organized by Rev. Arends in 1790, who served it until he was too feeble 
to do so. The deed for Zion called for a ten-acre tract of land. It 
was made on October 12, 1790, by Christian Nigh to Martin Speigel 
and Johannes Hahn, trustees, for five pounds. 

In 1791, the church and schoolhouse were built, and the grave- 
yard was laid off. The church was made of logs and hand-finished 
planks. It was two stories high, with a balcony on three sides, and a 
high pulpit. It appears that the German-Reformed members wanted 
to share in the building of the church, but the Lutherans wanted a 
church of their own, which arrangement was carried out. The church 
was dedicated in 1791 or 1792. Johannes Hahn, who gave considerable 
help in the building, lived to see it completed, but died in 1793. He 
was the first one buried in the graveyard. 

In 1882, the congregation voted to build a new brick church. 
The cornerstone was laid April 30, 1884. Rev. J. C. Moser was pastor 
when this church was finished in 1885, and the dedication was held on 
March 20, 1885. This was a beautiful church, but the facilities for 
educational purposes were not adequate. So, in 1949, a new Educa- 
tional Building with classrooms was added, and the church was refin- 
ished on the inside. 

This church was associated in a parish with other churches from 
time to time; at one time it was with Holy Trinity in Hickory, the last 
being with Bethlehem and New Jerusalem, but on November 12, 1939, 
Zion voted to be self-sustaining, effective January 1, 1940. The par- 
sonage, which belonged to the three churches, was sold and a new one 
built during the year. 

The first Sunday School was organized on March 12, 1882, by 
Rev. J. S. Koiner. The first fulltime English sermons were preached 
by Rev. Henry Goodman. This congregation has produced a number 
of fine leaders — both men and women — for the church at large, as 
well as in local activities. This is the home church for Rev. Roy B. 
Setzer and Rev. Claude V. Deal, and also for Mrs. Loy Setzer Deal, 
professor in Lenoir Rhyne College. 

Rev. Adolph Nussmann and Johannes Gottfried Arends, school 
teacher, began work in this area about the close of the year 1773. 
The work soon became so pressing that it was found necessary to 
ordain Arends, in 1775, to help take care of the many pastoral require- 
ments. Pastor Arends first served Organ Church for ten years, and 
then in 1785 he moved to Lincoln County and took charge of all the 
churches west of the Catawba River. In 1790, Rev. Arends and the 
people secured the land for Zion and built the first church, dedicating 



354 



History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 



It in 1792. Arends remained as the official pastor until 1807, however 
Rev. Philip Henkel assisted him during the last two years of his 
ministry. 

The Educational building constructed under the leadership of 
Pastor Don M. Michael, was dedicated January 25, 1953, by Rev. J. H. 
Young, pastor, assisted by President F. L. Conrad. 



List of Pastors: 



J. Gottfried Arends, 1790-1807 
Paul Henkel assisted 

Arends in the year 1803 
Philip Henkel, Assistant to 

Arends, 1805-1807 
Philip Henkel served as 

pastor from 1807-1812 
Daniel Moser, 1812-1839 

(Preached for 7 years before 

he was ordained) 
Christian Reitzel, 1840-1847 
Timothy Moser, 1847-1852 
Henry Goodman, 1852-1865 
Polycarp Henkel, 1865-1870 
J. M. Smith, 1870-1881 
J. S. Koiner, 1881-1883 



J. C. Moser, 1883-1885 
B. S. Brown, 1886-1887 
J. C. Moser, 1888-1906 
J .D. Mauney, 1907-1909 

B. L. Stroup, 1909-1915 
V. L. Fulmer, 1915-1917 

W. D. Haltiwanger, 1917-1925 

W. G. Cobb, 1926-1927 

G. H. L. Lingle, 1927-1931 

C. E. Lutz, 1931-1939 

John D. Barringer, 1940-1942 
W. L. Smith, 1943-1945 

D. B. Summers, 1945-1949 
Don M. Michael, 1949-1951 
J. H. Young, 1951- 



History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 355 

II — Discontinued or Merged Churches 

Name of Church Location 

Bethany Fredericktown, Davidson County 

Bethany 8 Miles North of Germantown, Stokes Co. 

Bethel Iron Station, Lincoln County 

Bethlehem 6 Miles Northeast of Walkertown, Forsyth Co. 

Cobb's Probably in Alamance County 

David's Chapel Western Part of Lincoln County 

Fanuel (Phanuel) Southern Part of Rowan County 

Flat Rock Western Part of Stanly County 

Hasse (Haas) Southeast of Newton, Catawba County 

Hebron (Minutes N. C. Synod 1810) Cleveland County Near 

Buffalo Mills 

Herman's Chapel Near St. Mark's, Blowing Rock 

Hopewell Southeast of Winston-Salem, Forsyth County 

Immanuel Southeast of Thomasville, Davidson County 

Immanuel Northwest of Monroe, Union County 

Killian's Settlement (Dutch Meeting House) Lincoln County 

Lutheran Union Southeast of Mt. Pleasant, Cabarrus County 

Lutheran Union (Luther's) Catawba County 

Luther's Chapel 2 Miles North of Lincolnton, Lincoln Co. 

Macedonia Millingport, Stanly County 

Mt. Ephraim 3 miles South of Mt. Pleasant 

Mt. Zion Morgan's Mill, Stanly County 

Morning Star South of Canton, Haywood County 

Mt. Carmel Southeast of Mt. Pleasant, Cabarrus County 

Mt. Zion West of Lenoir, Caldwell County 

Reformation (Formerly: Dutchman's Creek, 

New Jerusalem, Cherry Hill) Davie County 

Salem North of Taylorsville, Alexander County 

Salem Near Catawba River, Catawba County 

Schoolhouse Church Probably in Orange or Alamance County 

Siler City On Raleigh Highway, Chatham County 

St. James North of Cherryville, Lincoln County 

St. James Station Southport, N. C. 

St. Luke's North of Kings Mountain 

St. Martin's (Now Holy Trinity) Troutman, Iredell County 

St. Michael's (Now Holy Trinity) Troutman, Iredell County 

Trinity Northeast of Morganton, Burke County 

White Haven 1 Mile South of Lowesville, Gaston County 

Woman's Memorial (Changed to Emmanuel) High Point, N. C. 

Zion (Absorbed into Coble's) Guilford County 

Records show that there were several churches made up of colored 
people connected with the North Carolina Synod prior to the organizing 
of the Alpha Synod in 1889, of which we list the following: 

Spring Dale Church, near Alamance 

Pleasant Grove Church, Davidson County 

Concord Mission in Concord 

St. John's, Charlotte 



356 



History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 



Parishes, Congregations, and Pastors of Synods 
At Time of Merger, March 2, 1921. 



Parishes 



NORTH CAROLINA SYNOD 

Congregations 



Pastors 



Albemarle First Church Rev. V. C. Ridenhour, D.D. 

Albemarle St. Martin Rev. B. S. Brown, Sr., D.D. 

Macedonia 

Bear Poplar St. Luke's Rev. J. L. Yost 

Burlington Macedonia Rev. T. S. Brown 

Charlotte Holy Trinity Rev. W. A. Lutz 

Charlotte St. Mark's Rev. J. F. Crigler, D.D. 

China Grove St. Mark's Rev. C. P. Fisher, Sr. 

China Grove Lutheran Chapel Rev. C. A. Brown 

Center Grove 

Cleveland Lebanon Rev. C. M. Fox, Sup. 

St. Matthew's 

Providence 

Concord St. James _....Rev. M. L. Stirewalt, D.D. 

Concord St. Andrews Rev. M. L. Kester 

Calvary 

Concord St. John's Rev. R. T. Troutman 

Concord Prosperity Rev. J. B. Moose, Sup. 

Mt. Hermon 
Cold Water 
Faith Faith Rev. G. O. Ritchie 

Wittenberg 

Gibsonville Friedens..... Rev. Y. Von A. Riser 

Sharon 
Gold Hill St. Stephen's Rev. E. K. Bodie 

Mt. Olive 

Granite Quarry Christiana Rev. C. B. Miller, Sup. 

Greensboro First Church Rev. E. A. Shenk 

Guilford Lows Rev. H. W. Jeff coat 

St. Paul's 
Zion 

High Point Emmauel Rev. P. D. Brown 

Kannapolis Kimball Memorial Rev. G. H. C. Park 

Kannapolis St. Enoch Rev. B. S. Dasher 

Trinity 
Landis Trinity Rev. C. L Morgan 

Concordia 

Lexington First Church Rev. P. J. Bame 

Lexington St. Luke's Rev. C. H. Day 

Pilgrims 
Liberty Grace Student B. A. Barringer 

Richland 
Peace 

Mooresville St. Mark's Rev. L. A. Thomas 

Mt. Pleasant Holy Trinity Rev. R. A. Goodman 

Raleigh Holy Trinity Rev. A. M. Huffman 



History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 357 

Parishes Congregations Pastors 

Richfield Mt. Zion Rev. H. A. Trexler 

Luther's 
New Bethel 

Rockwell St. James Rev. C. R. Pless 

Immanuel 

Rural Hall Nazareth Rev. W. C. Buck 

Shiloh 
Bethany 
Hopewell 

Salisbury St. John's Rev. E. Fulenwider, D.D. 

Salisbury Haven Rev, G. H. L. Lingle 

Salisbury St. Matthew's Rev. G. H. Cooper 

St. Peter's 

Salisbury St. Paul Rev. C. E. Ridenhour 

Bethel 
Reformation 

Salisbury Salem Student J. Arthur Linn 

Grace 

Salisbury Organ Rev. M. L. Ridenhour 

Ebenezer 

Salisbury Union Rev. J. B. Haigler 

Spencer Calvary Rev. F. B. Lingle 

Christ Church 

Thomasville Grace Rev. N. D. Bodie 

Epiphany (Badin) 

Troutman St. Michael's Rev. John L. Morgan 

Amity 
St. Paul's 

Wilmington St. Paul's Rev. J. C. Seegers, D.D. 

Wilmington St. Matthew's Rev. G. W. McClanahan 

Winston-Salem Augusburg Rev. M. M. Kinard, D.D., Ph.D. 

Ministers In Other Church Callings 



Rev. A. G. Voigt, D.D., LL.D., Head of the Lutheran Seminary, at 

Columbia, S. C. 
Rev. J. H. C. Fisher, Principal of Mont Amoena Seminary, at Mt. 

Pleasant, N. C. 
Rev. Jacob L. Morgan, D.D., LL.D., Fulltime President of Synod, 

Salisbury, N. C. 
Rev. C. E. Norman, Missionary, Kumamoto, Japan. 
Rev. H. Aoyama, native missionary, Kumamoto, Japan. 
Rev. K. Takimoto, native missionary, Kumamoto, Japan. 
Rev. T. Chiga, native missionary, Japan. 

Ministers In Retirement 



Rev. L. A. Bikle, D.D., Concord, N. C. 
Rev. R. L. Brown, Salisbury, N. C. 
Rev. G. H. Cox, D.D., Salisbury, N. C 



)58 History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 

Rev. C. L. T. Fisher, Lynchburg, Va. 
Rev. W. R. Ketchie, Mocksville, N. C. 
Rev. J. A. Linn, Sr., Rockwell, N. C. 
Rev. V. R. Stickley, Barber, N. C. 
James D. Heilig, Esq., Treasurer of Synod, Salisbury, N. C. 



TENNESSEE SYNOD 

A. North Carolina Conference 
Parishes Congregations Pastors 

Boone Mt. Pleasant Rev. N. D. Yount 

Mt. Zion 

Holy Communion 

Holy Trinity 

China Grove Mt. Moriah Rev. J. S. Wessinger 

St. Mark's 

Cherryville St. John's Rev. B. D. Wessinger, D.D. 

St. James 

Claremont Mt. Calvary Rev. S. L. Nease 

Salem 

Crouse St. Paul's Rev. C. O. Lippard 

Bethphage 

Bethel 
St. Mark's 

Dallas Holy Communion Rev. C. N. Yount 

Philadelphia 

Antioch 

St. Paul's 

East Gastonia Lutheran Chapel Rev. A. L. Boliek 

Christ Church 
Bethel (Iron Station) 

Gastonia Holy Trinity Rev. J. C. Dietz 

Grace 

Granite Falls Philadelphia Rev. F. L. Conrad 

St. John's 
St. Matthew's 

Hendersonville Grace Rev. J. D. Mauney 

Hickory Bethany Rev. W. A. Deaton, D.D. 

Hickory Holy Trinity Rev. C. R. W. Kegley 

Hickory St. Andrew's Rev. R. B. Peery, Ph.D., D.D. 

Hickory St. Stephen's Rev. Enoch Hite 

Mt. Olive 

Hickory Zion Rev. W. D. Haltiwanger 

Bethlehem 
New Jerusalem 

Kings Mountain St. Matthew's Rev. H. B. Schaeffer 

St. Luke's 

Lenoir St. Stephen's Rev. L. D. Miller 

Mt. Zion 



History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 359 

Parishes Congregations Pastors 

Lexington Holly Grove Rev. R. B. Sigmon 

Beck's 

New Jerusalem 

Emmanuel 

Lebanon 

Lincolnton Daniel's Rev. L. L. Lohr, D.D. 

Grace 

Lincolnton Emmanuel's Rev. W. J. Roof 

St. Luke's 

Maiden St. Martin's Rev. W. D. Wise 

Salem 
Luther's Chapel 

Monroe St. Luke's Rev. Paul L. Miller 

Morning Star 

Morganton Calvary Rev. F. K. Roof 

Mt. Hebron 

Mt. Holly Good Shepherd Rev. E. H. Kohn, D.D., Ph.D. 

Holy Comforter 

Mt. Pleasant Mt. Gilead Rev. D. L. Miller 

St. Martin's 

Newton Beth Eden Rev. A. R. Beck, D.D. 

St. Timothy 

Newton St. James Rev. W. J. Boger, D.D. 

St. Paul's 
Ebenezer 

Randolph Melanchthon Rev. D. I. Offman 

Cobles 
Mt. Pleasant 

Statesville St. John's Rev. O. W. Aderholdt, D.D. 

Statesville Mt. Hermon Vacant 

Sharon 
St. Martin 

Taylorsville Friendship Rev. J. A. Yount 

Shiloh 

St. John's 

St. John's (Tayvle) 

St. Luke's (Catawba) 

Vale Trinity Rev. J. J. Bickley 

Sardis 

Cedar Grove 

David's Chapel 

Ministers In Other Church Callings 

Rev. R. L. Fritz, D.D., LL.D., Prof. Lenoir Rhyne College, Hickory, N. C. 

Rev. E. J. Sox, D.D., Prof. Lenoir Rhyne College, Hickory, N. C. 

Rev. C. K. Bell, D.D., Prof. Southern Theological Seminary, Columbia, S. C. 

Rev. W. H. Little, Prof. Lenoir Rhyne College, Hickory, N. C. 

Rev. F. C. Longaker, Ph.D., Prof. Lenoir Rhyne College, Hickory, N. C. 

Rev. J. C. Peery, D.D., President Lenoir Rhyne College, Hickory, N. C. 

Rev. J. L. Cromer, Business Manager Lenoir Rhyne College, Hickory, N. C. 

Rev. C. K. Lippard, Missionary, Saga, Japan. 

Rev. A. J. Stirewalt, Missionary, Kumamoto, Japan. 

Rev. Tsumrari Wasa, Missionary, Kurume, Japan. 



360 



History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 



Minister In Retirement 
Rev. J. P. Price, Hickory, N. C. 



Parishes 



B. South Carolina Conference 
Congregations 



Pastors 



Vacant 

.Rev. J. M. Senter, D.D. 



Cedar Grove Cedar Grove 

St. James 

Chapin Bethlehem 

Mt. Horeb 

New Brookland Mt. Tabor Rev, J. W. Oxner 

St. Andrews 

Pelion Holy Trinity Rev. B. J. Wessinger 

St. John's 

St. Jacob's St. Jacob's Rev. R. M. Carpenter 

St. Thomas 

St. Paul's St. Paul's Rev. G. A. Stoudemayer 

Grace 

St. Peter's St. Peter's Rev. B. L. Stroup 

St. John's 

Zion Zion Rev. J. A. Cromer 

Emmanuel 

Mt. Hermon 

Pilgrim 

St. Peter's 



Ministers In Retirement 
Rev. E. L. Lybrand, New Brookland, S. C. 
Rev. J. C. Wessinger, Little Mountain, S. C. 



Parishes 



Edinburg. 



C. Virginia Conference 
Congregations 



Pastors 



Salem Rev. W. L. Darr 

St. Jacob's 
Zion 

Forestville St. Mary's Rev. F. M. Speagle 

Solomon's 

Manassas Bethel Rev. E. Z. Pence 

Trinity 

Zion 

St. Luke's 

Mt. Nebo Mt. Nebo Rev. F. G. Morgan 

New Market Emmanuel's Rev. W. J. Finck, D.D. 

Mt. Zion 

Orkney Springs Bethel Rev. M. L. Pence 

Morning Star 

Powder Springs 

St. Paul's 



History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 



361 



Parishes 



Rockingham. 



Shenandoah. 



Congregatioyis 



.McGaheysville. 

St. Jacob's 

St. Paul's 

Trinity 

St. James 

St. Luke's 
St. Paul's 
St. Peter's 



Pastors 
.Rev. H. D. Chapman 



Stony Man. 



Timberville.... 
Tom's Brook. 



....Beth Eden.... 

Grace 

Morning Star 

Mt. Calvary 

Raders 

St. John's 

St. Paul's 

...Mt. Calvary... 

St. David's 
St. Matthew's 
St. Stephen's 



.Vacant 



-Rev. P. L. Snapp 



Rev. V. L. Fulmer 
...Rev. M. A. Ashby 



Ministers In Retirement 
Rev. I. Conder, McGaheysville, Va. 
Rev. J. W. Hausenfluck, Harrisonburg, Va. 
Rev. J. P. Stirewalt, D.D., New Market, Va. 



NOTE: Ministers and congregations of the South Carolina Conference of 
the Tennessee Synod were transferred to the South Carolina Synod in 
1922, and ministers and congregations of the Virginia Conference of 
the Tennessee Synod were transferred to the Virginia Synod in 1924. 



362 History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 



CHURCH HOMES 

For Children 
For Old Folks 



History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 363 



THE LUTHERAN CHILDREN'S HOME 



In September 1887 The Lutheran Visitor announced the beginnings 
of an Orphanage on the estate of Rev. William S. McClanahan, near 
Salem, Virginia. A brother of Pastor McClanahan had recently died 
in Texas, leaving several small children who were placed in the care 
of their Uncle William. One of whom later became known as Rev. 
G. W. McClanahan, D.D., and another as Mrs. (Dr.) R. C. Holland. This 
experience may have motivated Pastor William' McClanahan to an 
interest in and sympathy for other fatherless children. 

In 1888, through the leadership of Pastor McClanahan, an organi- 
zation was effected to operate an orphanage. The first Executive Com- 
mittee was composed of Dr. W. B. Yonce, Dr. John C. Bushnell, Rev. 
Wm. S. McClanahan, Hon. Henry S. Trout, Mr. D. B. Strouse, and Mr. 
T. J. Shickel. Pastor Wm. S. McClanahan was elected Superintendent. 
His niece, Miss Mary V. McClanahan (Mrs. R. C. Holland) was chosen 
as Matron, housekeeper, teacher and office helper. 

Since there was no organized source of income for operations, the 
workers had little compensation other than room and board. However, 
with the assistance of Pastor McClanahan and other interested friends, 
the Orphanage grew. 

Following Pastor McClanahan's resignation in 1893, Mrs. Amanda 
Davidson was elected as Matron, and Dr. F. V. N. Painter, Prof, in 
Roanoke College, was elected non-resident superintendent. Soon there- 
after the Orphanage was moved from the McClanahan estate to the 
David Trout estate between Roanoke and Salem. 

In 1897 the Orphanage was taken over by the United Lutheran 
Synod in the South, of which the N. C. Synod was a member, relocated 
on the Boulevard and Florida Street, Salem, and designated as The 
Lutheran Orphan Home of the South. The property was purchased 
for $3,500. 

In 1899, Hotel Salem was acquired for the Home at a cost of 
$14,500. 

Dr. Painter resigned in 1897, and the Rev. B. W. Cronk became the 
first full time Superintendent, with Mrs. Cronk as Matron. And this ar- 
rangement continued until 1904, when Professor J. T. Crabtree was 
elected. 

In 1921 the Rev. E. W. Leslie was called as Associate Superin- 
tendent. And following Professor Crabtree's death in 1922, Pastor Leslie 
became Superintendent and served until 1924 when he was succeeded by 
Mr. Geo. Santmier, who held the office until 1927. 



364 History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 

After the Elizabeth College buildings burned in 1922, the lands 
thereof were purchased for the Orphanage at a cost of $31,500. A new 
Administration Building and four cottages were erected. The Corner- 
stone was placed in 1925. 

From 1927 to 1928 the Rev. Paul Sieg and his wife were in charge. 
The Rev. T. A. Graves was elected superintendent in 1928 and served for 
ten years, during which time the indebtedness was paid, and a Superin- 
tendent's home was built. 

In 1947 the name was changed to The Lutheran Children's Home 
of the South, and continues to be operated by the Southern Synods. 

Mr. T. C. Rohrbaugh has been Superintendent since 1938. 



THE LOWMAN HOME 

In 1911 Mrs. R. M. (Malissa) Lowman offered her entire estate, 
embracing 1000 acres of land, buildings and village property, located 
near White Rock, South Carolina, and valued at $40,000, to the South 
Carolina Lutheran Synod, to be known as The Lowman Home for the 
Aged and Helpless. The chief stipulation in the offer was that her 
three helpless children be cared for in the Home during their natural 
life. The Synod accepted the offer, and through the leadership of Dr. 
W. H. Greever, inaugurated plans and procedures to raise $10,000 for 
repairs to buildings, and provide equipment to operate such a Home. 

Soon after the acceptance of the project by the South Carolina 
Synod, the Home was accepted by the United Synod of the Evangelical 
Lutheran Church in the South, and following the merger in 1918, the 
Home was turned over to the Southern Synods for support and 
maintenance. 

The Reverend W. P. Cline, D.D., became the first Superintendent, 
and served for twelve years. Dr. Cline was followed by Mr. C. E. 
Hotinger, and upon his resignation, Mrs. H. A. Jackson became assistant 
superintendent and was succeeded by Mrs. R. S. (Beatrice) Sease. The 
Rev. L. E. Blackwelder has been superintendent since January 1, 1949. 

Dr. W. H. Greever served as Chairman of the Board of Trustees for 
twenty years. He was followed by Dr. Wynne C. Boliek, present Chair- 
man. 

In 1926 the Home was moved to its present location, and the main 
building was erected. 

Since then the Huffard Cottage was erected in 1937, the Julius 
Alice Cline building in 1938, and the Wessels-Kuck building in 1950. 

The Home cares for 120 people, half of whom are invalids. The 
Staff numbers 20 and 8 farm helpers. 



History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 



365 










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Time, Place and Officers of the Conventions of 
The North Carolina Synod, The Tennessee 
Synod, and The United Lutheran Synod of North 
Carolina 



Due to the fact that there was no meeting in the cal- 
endar year 1818 nor in 1926, the serial number of 
conventions of the North Carolina Synod does not run 
out evenly with the 150th anniversary year. 



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390 History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 

INDEX OF MINISTERS 

Adderholdt, Rev. C. C 234, 281 

Aderholdt, Rev. O. W., D.D 94, 174, 176, 217, 265, 276, 305, 331 

Aldrich, Rev. Nathan 92. 304, 315, 325 

Anthony, Rev. J. B 168, 191, 231, 258, 297, 309, 336, 351^ 

Aoyama, Rev. T 

Arends, Rev. J. Gottfried 21, 22, 31, 38, 167, 190 

206, 213, 214, 2.38, 257, 265 

299, 303, 317, 330, 350, 354 

Arey, Rev. Benjamin 168, 171, 172, 231, 258 

309, 324, 334, 336 

Arndt, Rev. J. Allen 192, 198, 246, 259, 275, 292, 310 

Artz, Rev. William 56, 185, 206, 236, 238, 274, 328, 351 

Ashby, Rev. M. A 212, 226, 239 

Aull, Rev. W. B 179, 182, 188, 281, 316, 320, 336, 346 

Ballentine, Rev. J. L 272 

Bame, Rev. P. J 204, 218, 285 

Bame, Rev. R. L 169, 257, 280 

Barb, Rev. J. C 79 

Barger, Rev. G. L 177, 187, 288, 345 

Barrier, Rev. J. W 288, 345 

Barringer, Rev. B. A 216, 243, 274 

Barringer, Rev. H. P., Th.D 174, 176, 212, 317, 331, 334 

Barringer, Rev. J. D 215, 354 

Beam, Rev. K. J 176, 206 

Bearden, Rev. G. S 166, 328 

Beatty, Rev. H. E 328 

Beaver, Rev. E. T 

Beck, Rev. A. R., D.D 98, 164, 168, 172, 201, 220 

267, 270, 300, 335, 344 

Bedell, Rev. G. T 52 

Bell, Rev. C. K., D.D 309, 325 

Bell, Rev. J. E 44, 115 

Bennick, Rev. J. S 

Bernhardt, Rev. Chas. E 167, 183, 294, 310 

Bernhardt, Rev. Christian Eberhard 24, 26, 27, 54, 206 

269, 308, 328, 374 
Bernheim, Rev. C. H 168, 169, 172, 206, 208, 234, 259 

279, 281, 299, 308, 328, 344 
Bernheim, Rev. G. D., D.D 31, 42, 48, 56, 113, 192. 231 

258, 297, 311, 315, 328, 338 

Bickley, Rev. J. J 174, 176. 180, 183, 221 

300, 317, 323, 331, 349 

Bikle, Rev. L. A., D.D 84, 92, 187, 192, 198 

238, 290, 309, 325 

Bikle, Rev. P. M., Ph.D 

Bittle, Rev. D. H., D.D 58 

Blackwelder, Rev. L. E 200, 202, 221, 219, 352 

Blackwelder, Rev. O. F., D.D., LL.D 

Bodie, Rev. E. K 171, 252, 266, 278, 312, 328, 341 

Bodie, Rev. N. D 184, 191, 218, 269, 293, 309, 3.51, 352 

Boger, Rev. W. J., D.D 93, 192, 210, 211, 220 

239, 245, 292, 311, 337 

Boggs, Rev. J. R 216, 243, 274 

Boggs, Rev. W. G 184 

Boland, Rev. L. P 208, 235, 271, 280, 288, 293, 324, 345 

Boland, Rev. M. Q 163, 245, 311 

Boldt, Rev. Karl 338 



History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 391 

INDEX OF MINISTERS 

Boliek, Rev. A. L 168, 175, 183, 208, 220, 239, 259, 

261, 280, 323, 337, 344, 367 

Bolles, Rev. E. A 304, 367 

Bonham, Rev. Nehemiah 245, 251, 322, 349, 367 

Boozer, Rev. V. Y., D.D 175, 200, 204, 217, 235, 239, 

242, 266, 276, 297, 334, 367 

Bost, Rev. R. M 367 

Baukmight, Rev. L. E 319, 367 

Bowden, Rev. G. S 367 

Bowden, Rev. G. S., Jr 168, 169, 191, 367 

Bowers, Rev. W. W 290, 367 

Bowles, Rev. J. D 168, 169, 191, 234, 251, 269, 281, 309, 367 

Bowman, Rev. W. S., D.D 163, 315, 367 

Bremen, Rev. Nicolai 25, 367 

Brown, Rev. A. J., D.D 79, 238, 239, 245, 367 

Brown, Rev. B. S., Sr., D.D 146, 163, 181, 188, 193, 201, 228, 231, 238, 

270, 271, 276, 324, 336, 346, 354, 367 

Brown, Rev. B. S., Jr., D.D 11, 190, 203, 204, 213, 214, 238, 367 

Brown, Rev. C. A 180, 181, 184, 188, 193, 206, 217, 232, 

238, 249, 265, 270, 278, 350, 367 

Brown, Rev. C. L., D.D 131, 367 

Brown, Rev. H. M 162, 163, 175, 182, 191, 231, 257, 

274, 281, 322, 324, 336, 367 

Brown, Rev. P. D., D.D 97, 101, 184, 194, 195, 218, 304, 367 

Brown, Rev. R. L 183, 184, 191, 199, 200, 241, 270, 324, 340, 350, 367 

Brown, Rev. T. S 56, 242, 266, 315, 367 

Brown, Rev. W. R 193, 265, 367 

Buck, Rev. J. L 181, 206, 238, 242, 328, 367 

Buck, Rev. W. C 191, 207, 269, 281, 309, 326, 340, 367 

Buelow, Rev. Joachim 23, 367 

Bumgarner, Rev. L. C 239, 283, 334, 367 

Burgell, Rev. Samuel 20, 367 

Busby, Rev. L. E.. D.D 184, 229, 204, 367 

Campbell, Rev. W. G 56, 290, 367 

Canup, Rev. M. L., D.D 194, 195, 202, 203, 367 

Carpenter, Rev. C. W 282, 367 

Carpenter, Rev. M. L 173, 174, 222, 240, 254, 261, 331, 367 

Carpenter, Rev. R. M 169, 190, 214, 250, 267, 279, 300, 323, 336, 367 

Castor, Rev. B. D 258, 323, 345, 367 

Castor, H. C 347, 367 

Cauble, Rev. F. P., Ph.D 216, 224, 230, 239, 285, 327, 340, 367 

Cauble, Rev. H. W 297, 304, 367 

Cauble, Rev. J. L 367 

Chang, Rev. H. S 367 

Chapman, Rev. H. D 367 

Chiga, Rev. T 367 

Clapp, Rev. Nathen (Col.) 56, 57, 367 

Clark, Rev. B. M 258, 327, 340, 368 

Clausen, Rev. F. B., D.D 338, 368 

Cline, Rev. J. P 368 

Cline, Rev. R. H 180, 183, 245, 251, 277, 300, 

311, 317, 320, 331, 347, 368 

Cline, Rev. W. P., D.D 123, 175, 198, 219, 231, 252, 267, 

277, 285, 305, 310, 322, 325, 368 

Cloninger, Rev. J 79, 368 

Cobb, Rev. J. K 267, 273, 300, 323, 368 

Cobb, Rev. J. W 151, 368 

Cobb, Rev. P. B 162, 177, 187, 368 



392 History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 

INDEX OF MINISTERS 

Cobb, Rev. W. G 175, 217, 260, 276, 278, 287, 300, 304 

Coble, Rev. Michael M. (Col.) 56, 57 

Coffman, Rev. J. H 288, 304 

Conder, Rev. 1 168, 251, 259, 270 

Cone, Rev. W. H 168, 181, 234, 241, 265, 290 

327, 334, 340, 350, 351 

Conrad, Rev. D. F 

Conrad, Rev. E. P 166, 182, 219 

Conrad, Rev. F. L., D.D 102, 103, 162, 181, 195, 200, 209, 210, 211 

226, 244, 267, 276, 286, 300, 318, 323 

Conrad, Rev. F. L., Jr 221, 344 

Conrad, Rev. G. D 169, 218, 315 

Cook, Rev. F. P 

Cooper, Rev. D. F 98, 209, 229, 272. 287, 315 

Cooper, Rev. E. C, Ph. D 164, 165, 170, 178, 202, 221, 224, 267 

Cooper, Rev. G. H 326, 340 

Cooper, Rev. L. G., Ph.D 

Counts, Rev. E. K 321, 323 

Cox, Rev. C. Brown, D.D 242, 266 

Cox. Rev. G. H., D.D 182, 187, 193, 198, 199, 201, 252 

265, 283, 288, 297, 341, 352 

Craun, Rev. W. A 178, 248 

Crlgler, Rev. J. F., D.D 315 

Crim, Rev. Jacob 168, 174, 191, 257, 269, 281, 309, 324 

Cromer, Rev. J. A 

Cromer, Rev. J. L 101, 172, 192, 226, 248 

267, 275, 292, 322, 344 

Cromer, Rev. V. R., D.D 101, 108. 125, 180, 184 

208, 228, 290, 310 

Cronk, Rev. B. W 185, 235, 236, 274, 276, 312 

Cronk, Rev. E. C, D.D Ill, 152 

Grouse, Rev. A. L 123, 208, 252, 280, 285, 342 

Crouse, Rev. Thomas 168, 186, 243, 253, 259, 270 

Cruse, Rev. G. C 252, 341 

Cuthbertson, Rev. R. B 183, 286, 310, 333 

Daniel, Rev. Vance M 244, 273, 348 

Darr, Rev. W. L 231, 250, 279, 305 

Dasher, Rev. B. S 177, 206, 278, 283, 288, 345 

Dasher, Rev. E. A 340 

Dasher, Rev. L. O 

Davis, Rev. J. B., D.D 174, 216, 228, 252 

Davis, Rev. J. F 165, 170, 177, 224, 225, 239, 282, 338 

Day, Rev. C. H 177, 187, 267, 269, 283, 309 

Deal, Rev. C. V 239, 245, 311, 333, 346 

Deal, Rev. H. G 137 

Deal, Rev. J. F Ill, 168, 180, 183, 220 

300 310 321 343 349 

Deaton, Rev. J. L 168, 222, 25l! 254! 255,' 260,' 320 

Deaton, Rev. W. A., D.D 88, 95, 164, 169, 178, 183, 221, 226 

248. 254, 261, 267, 323. 343, 349 

Derhammer, Rev. G. A 174, 240, 331 

Derrick, Rev. C. K., D.D 165, 309, 325 

Derrick, Rev. P. H. E 229, 241, 252, 341 

Dickert, Rev. J. C 216, 243, 274 

Diefendorf, Rev. C 326 

Dietz, Rev. J. C, D.D 94, 95, 174, 176, 198, 204, 208, 212 

260, 300, 310, 321, 331, 337, 351 
Dosh, Rev. T. W., D.D 



History of the Lutheran Church in N, C. 393 

INDEX OF MINISTERS 



Dreher, Rev. D. 1 290, 351 



Dreher, Rev. Godfrey 52, 54, 369 

Dreher, Rev. John 369 

Dressier, Rev. H. L., D.D 228, 369 

Dutton, Rev. W. A 241, 252, 255, 258, 279, 341, 369 

Dutton, Rev. W. H 164, 250, 252, 267, 321, 323, 336, 341, 369 

Dysinger, Rev. Holmes, D.D 188, 369 

Easterly, Rev. George 174, 267, 369 

Eckard, Rev. R. E 369 

Efird, Rev. Daniel 279, 323, 369 

Efird, Rev. Adam 168, 251, 270, 279, 323, 369 

Efird, Rev. F. K 245, 311, 333, 369 

Efird, Rev. J. K 369 

Emmert, Rev. J. B 79, 369 

Empie, Rev. Adam 52, 369 

Farris, Rev. M. R 204, 206, 221, 266, 276, 278, 369 

Felker, Rev. Ernest 282, 369 

Fesperman, Rev. F. 1 369 

Fesperman, Rev. J. H 172, 231, 271, 336, 369 

Fink, Rev. W. J., D.D 26, 369 

Fink, Rev. W. H 369 

Fisher, Rev. Carl H 211, 216, 243, 274, 294, 328, 369 

Fisher, Rev. C. L. T 229, 241, 247, 255, 369 

Fisher, Rev. C. P., D.D 187, 188, 199, 200, 251, 258, 

270, 293, 316, 346, 352, 369 

Fisher Rev. C. P., Jr 270, 293, 369 

Fisher, Rev. E. H 369 

Fisher, Rev. H. G 161, 188, 309, 325, 369 

Fisher, Rev. J. H. C 110, 187, 199, 241, 247, 249, 258, 270, 369 

Fisher, Rev. Roscoe B 98, 224, 247, 279, 291, 

298, 333, 336, 343, 369 
Fisher, Rev. Roy L 168, 174, 176, 219, 220, 234, 

257, 281, 317, 331, 369 

Fisher, Ray R 166, 179, 182, 313, 369 

Fleenor, Rev. Adam 369 

Fleenor, Rev. James 370 

Folk, Rev. E. L 166, 203, 370 

Forrester, Rev. David 370 

Fox, Rev. Alfred J., D.D., M.D 74, 84, 85, 86, 92, 176, 183, 

190, 214, 228, 231, 245, 251, 260, 
277, 310, 321, 325, 349, 370 

Fox, Rev. C. M 186, 188, 217, 236, 241, 255, 274, 328, 345, 370 

Fox, Rev. D. E 370 

Fox, Rev. J. B., Ph.D 211, 325 

Fox, Rev. L. A., D.D., LL.D 74, 317, 370 

Fox, Rev. M. L., D.D., M.D 186, 243, 253, 370 

Franklow, Rev. J. P 54, 370 

Freed, Rev. W. B., D.D 315, 338, 370 

Freeze, Rev. G. L 286, 370 

Fritz, Rev. C. E., D.D 164, 202, 203, 221, 267, 335, 370 

Fritz, Rev. R. D 248, 370 

Fritz, Rev. R. L., D.D., LL.D 123, 126, 280, 285, 330, 337, 370 

Fulenwider, Rev. E., D.D 62, 133, 203, 231, 242, 

247, 249, 283, 304, 370 

Fulmer, Rev. V. L 172, 260, 344, 370 

Funk, Rev. W. H 336, 354, 370 

George, Rev. J. J 94, 111, 176, 300, 317, 370 

Gerberding, Rev. W. P., D.D 325, 370 



369 



394 History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 

INDEX OF MINISTERS 



Gerhart, Rev. William, D.D 118, 336, 370 

Goodman, Rev. D. A 74, 254, 261, 267, 370 

Goodman, Rev. G. B 177, 187, 288, 370 

Goodman, Rev. Henry 81, 186, 214, 243, 245, 251, 253, 

260, 270, 292, 321, 342, 354, 370 

Goodman, Rev. J. 1 165, 370 

Goodman, Rev. R. A., D.D 179, 182, 229, 231, 370 

Graeber, Rev. Henry, D.D., M.D 168, 213, 238, 241, 265, 297, 370 

Greever, Rev. J. J 55, 370 

Grieson, Rev. Jacob 206, 236, 274, 328, 370 

Griffin, Rev. J. L 283, 316, 370 

Grimes, Rev. Adam 257, 280, 281, 370 

Groseclose, Rev. L. C 92, 168, 191, 206, 228, 241, 258, 297, 

304, 309, 326, 328, 341, 351, 370 

Grossman, Rev. M 370 

Gruber, Rev. H. L 241, 370 

Hahn, Rev. A. L 370 

Hahn, Rev. L. C 176, 180, 193, 249, 370 

Hahn, Rev. S. W., D.D 166, 290, 370 

Haigler, Rev. J. B 351, 370 

Haithcox, Rev. H. C, D.D 276, 312, 370 

Hall, Rev. B. C 185, 236, 274, 276, 334, 351, 370 

Hall, Rev. John, D.D 91, 111, 190, 212, 214, 222, 226, 

252, 255, 261, 275, 313, 370 

Hall, Rev. W. E 282, 370 

Hallman, Rev. S. T., D.D 187, 249, 290, 371 

Haltimanger, Rev. W. D 175, 231, 250, 260, 279, 354, 371 

Hamm, Rev. L. B., D.D 242, 309, 326, 371 

Hancher, Rev. J. K 79, 371 

Hancher, Rev. William 371 

Harbinson, Rev. C. W 208, 280, 293, 306, 342, 371 

Harr, Rev. F. M 206, 278, 326, 340, 371 

Harr, Rev. Joseph 371 

Hany, Rev. J. H 290, 371 

Harter, Rev. W. G 187, 241, 258, 288, 290, 336, 351, 371 

Hartwig, Rev. G. H 371 

Houck, Rev. William 371 

Hauer, Rev. D. J., D.D 206, 236, 274, 328, 371 

Hausenfluck, Rev. J. W 371 

Hawkins, Rev. Elijah 55, 371 

Hawthorne, Rev. H. D 172, 195, 245, 311, 371 

Hedrick, Rev. J. M 184, 187, 191, 249, 269, 309, 350, 371 

Hegler, Rev. D. L 371 

Heilig, Rev. J. S 187, 276, 288, 336, 345, 371 

Helland, Rev. C. K 326, 371 

Helms, Rev. R. A 168, 231, 271, 324, 336, 371 

Henkel, Rev. Ambrose 251, 371 

Henkel, Rev. Andrew 371 

Henkel, Rev. David 42, 43, 44, 45, 46, 73, 77, 112, 174, 183, 

190, 245, 267, 310, 322, 330, 337, 349, 371 

Henkel, Rev. David M., D.D 228, 297, 371 

Henkel, Rev. David S 251, 322, 371 

Henkel, Rev. Eusebius 371 

Henkel, Rev. Gerhard 26, 371 

Henkel, Rev. Paul 26, 27, 29, 30, 32, 35, 44, 45, 

54, 77, 78, 168, 169, 190, 198, 252, 

269, 270, 280, 309, 317, 334, 371 



History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 395 

INDEX OF MINISTERS 

Henkel, Rev. Philip 32, 36, 41, 44, 78, 115, 174, 

186, 190, 206, 214, 236, 251, 262, 

299, 310, 328, 337, 349, 354, 371 

Henkel, Rev. P. C, D.D 74, 81, 84, 121, 183, 190, 207, 231, 

254, 261, 267, 291, 299, 330, 337, 371 

Henkel, Rev. Socrates, D.D 33, 74, 77, 86, 112, 371 

Herscher, Rev. Samuel 54, 371 

Hewitt, Rev. A. K., D.D 219, 246, 327, 340, 371 

Heydenreich, Rev. L. W 371 

Hill, Rev. G. L 192, 292, 371 

Hiller, Rev. W. H 209, 210, 269, 290, 297, 309, 371 

Hite, Rev. Enoch 198, 206, 251, 266, 310, 320, 342, 371 

Holland, Rev. R. C, D.D 199, 315, 371 

Holt, Rev. Samuel (Col.) 56, 57, 371 

Honeycutt, Rev. C. A., D.D 371 

Hook, Rev. W. F 215, 371 

Hopkins, Rev. B. N 171, 172, 276, 288, 336, 371 

Hubbert, Rev. W. E 371 

Huddle, Rev. K. Y 282, 328, 345, 372 

Huddle, Rev. W. P 326, 340, 372 

Huffman, Rev. A. M., D.D 230, 309, 325, 331, 372 

Huffman, Rev. D. C 252, 372 

Huffman, Rev. L. L 212, 239, 372 

Hull, Rev. J. W 231, 251, 279, 323, 372 

Hunsucker, Rev. W. P 172, 173 

Hunt, Rev. G. L 152, 163, 174, 331 

Hunton, Rev. J. H 372 

Hunton, Rev. W. L Ill, 172 

Iddings, Rev. J. W 184, 193, 201, 202, 249, 313, 372 

Jacobs, Rev. H. E., D.D., LL.D 14 

Jeffcoat, Rev. H. W 162, 182, 186, 255, 274, 314, 323, 336, 372 

Jeffcoat, Rev. L. H 372 

Jenkins, Rev. Daniel 168, 169, 258, 309, 350, 372 

Jenkins, Rev. William 372 

Johnson, Rev. D. F 233, 327 

Julian, Rev. W. A 168, 185, 191, 219, 236, 269, 288, 309, 345, 372 

Kaempfer, Rev. Jacob 238, 241, 265, 372 

Keck, Rev. A. H., Jr 198, 240, 310, 372 

Keever, Rev. E. F., D.D 338, 372 

Kegley, Rev. C. R. W 228, 328, 372 

Keiser, Rev. Albert, Ph.D 208, 293, 372 

Keller, Rev. S. L 270, 297, 372 

Kepley, Rev. R. H 221, 235, 250, 271, 324, 337, 342, 372 

Kern, Rev. Jas. S 372 

Kester, Rev. M. L 170, 177, 191, 219, 269, 309, 341, 372 

Ketchie, Rev. W. R 191, 257, 265, 281, 324, 336, 341, 372 

Kibler, Rev. Martin 372 

Kiesler, Rev. S. S 372 

Killian, Rev. Jacob 245, 251, 340, 372 

Kimbell, Rev. Whitson 163, 169, 181, 188, 231, 242, 251, 269, 281, 

309, 324, 328, 336, 337, 342, 349, 372 

Kinard, Rev. J. D., D.D 305, 372 

Kinard, Rev. M. M., D.D., Ph.D Ill, 166, 179, 203, 304, 372 

King, Rev. C. B., D.D 304, 315, 372 

King, Rev. C. S 217, 298, 343, 372 

Kinney, Rev. P. G 184, 188, 192, 216, 249, 253, 274, 328, 372 

Kistler, Rev. H. A., Ph.D 163, 222, 235, 255, 261, 271, 324, 372 

Kistler, Rev. Paul 172, 231, 336, 372 



396 History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 

INDEX OF MINISTERS 

Kluttz, Rev. M. J 312, 352 

Knight, Rev. O. K 190 

Kohn, Rev. E. H., D.D., Ph.D 93, 95, 176, 211, 220, 300, 317, 331 

Koiner, Rev. J. S 354 

Koontz, Rev. D. J. (Col.) 56, 57 

Kuhn, Rev. H. A 348 

Kuhns, Rev. S. W 188 

Kuntz, Rev. F. B 255 

Kyles, Rev. C. F 163, 168, 207, 217, 234, 259, 270, 324 

Lackey, Rev. J. L 241, 255, 258, 344 

Lasley, Rev. J. K 209, 210, 305 

Lefstead, Rev. W. H 175, 282, 334 

Lentz, Rev. Caleb 172, 191 

Lentz, Rev. John 334 

Leonard, Rev. H. B 208, 232, 255, 261, 280, 293 

Leslie, Rev. E. W 211, 326, 340 

Lindler, Rev. J. D 215 

Lineberger, Rev. C. R 322 

Lineberger, Rev. E. R., Sr 178, 182, 184, 192, 292, 318 

Lineberger, Rev. E. R., Jr 347 

Lineberger, Rev. H. F 193, 245, 270, 311 

Lingle, Rev. F. B 179, 182, 203, 225 

Lingle, Rev. G. H. L 94, 95, 175, 191, 206, 251 

278, 309, 319, 334, 341, 354 

Lingle, Rev. G. W 226, 291 

Link, Rev. A. S 

Link, Rev. J. W 229, 247 

Linn, Rev. C. A., D.D., Ph.D 229, 247, 300 

Linn, Rev. H. C 232, 254, 255, 261 

Linn, Rev. J. Adolphus 171, 217, 228, 241, 258, 293, 340, 352 

Linn, Rev. J. Arthur 215, 217, 252, 276, 312 

Linn, Rev. John K 216 

Linn, Rev. Joseph A 58, 117, 184, 201, 241, 326, 336, 340, 341 

Lippard, Rev. A. W 178, 215, 240, 275, 307, 322 

Lippard, Rev. C. K., D.D 131 

Lippard, Rev. C. 135, 173, 188, 237, 300, 323, 331, 346 

Little, Rev. M. L 163, 183, 221, 254, 261, 277, 300, 317, 349 

Little, Rev. W. H 247, 321, 322 

Lohr, Rev. LL.D., D.D 164, 176, 180, 190, 239 

275, 300, 310, 317, 349 

Long, Rev. G. E 208 

Long, Rev. L E., D.D 166, 312, 319 

Long, Rev. J. J., D.D 297 

Longaker, F. C, Ph.D 166, 231 

Ludwig, Rev. R. F 327 

Lutz, Rev. C. E 175, 188, 208, 217, 257, 280, 293, 354 

Lutz, Rev. W. A 165, 169, 187, 225, 252, 276, 305, 345 

Lybrand, Rev. E. L 

Lyerly, Rev. C. C 241, 255, 258 

Lyerly, Rev. J. W 244, 248, 340 

Lyerly, Rev. Q. 162, 185, 216, 236, 246, 250, 274, 279 

MacLaughlin, Rev. C. P., D.D 184, 206, 212, 266, 278, 328 

Marcard, Rev. Adam N 186, 187, 245, 297, 321 

McCauley, Rev. E. R., D.D 230 

McClanahan, Rev. G. W., D.D 184, 206, 212, 266, 278, 328 

McCullough, Rev. H. A., D.D 93, 94, 111, 118 

201, 229, 249, 283 
McCullough, Rev. H. A., Jr 198, 240 



History of the Lutheran Church in N. C. 
INDEX OF MINISTERS 



397 



McMakin, Rev. Michael 

Markert, Rev. J. L 32, 168, 169, 191, 

269, 274, 309, 

Marks, Rev. C. A 181, 238, 

Marz, Rev. W. G 

Matthias, Rev. H. J 183, 198, 221, 267, 275, 

Mauney, Rev. J. D 126, 172, 214, 215, 252, 260, 285, 324, 

Mauney, Rev. J. D., Jr 252, 

Mauney, Rev. J. Luther 

Mauney, Rev. M. F 

Medlin, Rev. W. F 

Meetze, Rev. J. Y 

Mengert, Rev. J. H 

Metz, Rev. G. A 

Meyer, Rev. J. W 168, 258, 269, 

Michael, Rev. D. M 309, 

Michael, Rev. D. W 163, 231, 269, 

Miller, Rev. Adam, Sr 74, 78, 321, 

Miller, Rev. Adam, Jr 80, 163, 174, 190, 198, 207, 213, 

299, 310, 322, 330, 331. 342, 

Miller, Rev. C. B 184, 188, 199, 206, 219, 242, 270, 316, 

Miller, Rev. C. L., D.D 168, 214, 218, 220. 

260 270, 285 291 

Miller, Rev. D. L 180, 231, 247, 25o! 277^ 279,' 321,' 

Miller, Rev. G. A 177, 252, 341, 

Miller, Rev. H. N., Ph.D 217, 228, 235, 

Miller, Rev. Jacob 168, 269, 

Miller, Rev. J. A. L 187, 257, 281, 

Miller, Rev. J. I 

Miller, Rev. J. P., D.D 182, 184, 208, 229, 251, 280, 320, 344, 

Miller, Rev. Lester D., D.D 187, 247, 249, 297, 321, 

Miller, Rev. L. David 

Miller, Rev. L. G. S., D.D 

Miller, Rev. L. S 173, 174, 176, 298, 317, 331, 

Miller, Rev. Martin M 207, 

Miller, Rev. Paul L 193, 208, 209, 245, 270, 311, 

Miller, Rev. P. L 181, 182, 201, 

Miller, Rev. Peter 249, 

Miller, Rev. Robert J 25, 26, 31, 32, 33, 

46, 52, 54, 191, 

Miller, Rev. Timothy 

Misenheimer, Rev. C. A 163, 235, 252, 271, 312, 324, 

Misenheimer, Rev. E. L., Jr 181, 199, 253, 304, 

Monroe, Rev. P. E., D.D., LL.D 125, 228, 257, 280, 

Moose, Rev. J. B., D.D., Ph.D 187, 218, 241, 249, 255, 258, 

Moose, Rev. P. E 241, 250, 258, 276, 279, 

Morehead, Rev.